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Miscellanies

ISBN13: 9781408628645
ISBN: 1408628643
Binding: Paperback
List Price: $9.95
Publisher: Spalding Press
Published Date:
Pages: 356

MISCELLANIES BY RALPH WALDO - 1892 - NOTE - THE first five pieces in this volume, and the Editorial Address from the Massachusetts Quarterly Review, were published by Mr. Emerson, long ago. The speeches at thc John Brown, the Walter Scott, and the Free Religious Association meetings were published at the time, no doubt with his consent, but without any active cooperation on his part. The Fortune of the Republic appeared separately in 1879 the rest have never been ublished. In none was any change from the original form made by me, except in the Fortune of the Republic, which was made up from several lectures for the occasion upon which it was read. J. E. CABOT. - CONTENTS - PAGE THE LORDS SUPPER . . . . . . . HISTORICALL I SCOURSE . . . . . . . ADDRESS A T DEDICATIOX O F SOLDIERS I ONUMEST IN CONCORD . . . . . . . . AI DHESS OX EJIASCIPATIO IN N TIIE BRITISH WEST I S D L . . . . . . . . . . I y . 4 . . . . . THE FUGITIV S E L AVE L AW . . . . . . TIIE ASSAULT UPON MR . SU INER . . . . SPEECH ON AFFAIRS IN Kaasns . . . . . REMARKS A T A IEETIN F O OR RELIEF OF JOHN BR WX F S A MILY . . . . . . . . JOHN BR OWN . . . . . . . . TIIIZOI O P R A E R KER . . . . . . . . . . . . . A I E H I C N C I L Z A T O S TIIK E ll. CIPBTION PRO MATIO . N . . . . A BHAIIAM LISCOLN . . . . . . . I I I . l I t T i O l I l S O M A D D E M . O E R S A S . T I S O P N . E EC . H . . . . . . . v 0 1 AS . . . . . . . . . . I I HESSTOKOSSUTH . . . l l ., n n B UR XS . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALTER SCOTT 1.1 . a r l i A T s T I E O RGAWI AT O I F O T I IE FREE RE LIGIOUS ASSOCIATION . . . . . . . SPEECH A T THE ANNUAL E E T I N O G F THE FREER E LIGIOUS ASSOCIATIOX . . . . . . . THE FORTUN OF E THE REPUBLIC . . . .. THE LORDS SUPPER. SERJION DELIIERlCD BEFORE TIIE SECOYD CIIURCU I i BUSTOX, SEPTEJIUEK 9, l8 3. THE LORDS SUPPER. The Kingdom of sod ia not meat and drink but righteouenesq and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost. - R o w 8 xiv. 17. IN the history of the Church no subject has been more fruitful of controversy than the Lords Supper. There never has been any unnnimity in the understand ing of its nature, nor any uniformity in the mode of celebrating it. Without considering the frivolous questions which have been lately debated as to the posture in which men should partake of it whether m ed or unmixed wine should be served whether leavened or unleavened bread should be broken - the questions have been settled differently in-every church, who should be admitted to the feast, and how often it should be prepared. In the Catholic Church, infants were at one time permitted and then forbidden to partake and, since the ninth century, the laity received the bread only, the cup being reserved to the priesthood. So, as to the time of the solemnity. In the Fourth Lateran Council, it was decreed that any believer should communicate at least once in a year, - at Easter. Afterwards it was determined that this Sacrament should be received three times in the year, - at Easter, Whitauntide and Christmas. But more important controversies have arisen respecting its nature. The famous question of the Real Presence was the main controversy between the Church of England and the Church of Rome. The doctrine of the Consubstantiation taught by Luther was denied by Calvin. In the Church of England, Archbishops Laud and Wake maintained that the elements were an Eucharist, or sacrifice of Thanksgiving to God Cudworthand Warburton, that this was not a sacrifice, but a sacrificial feast and Bishop Hoadley, that it was neither a sacrifice nor a feast after sacrifice, but a simple commemoration...