Stephen King Books In Order

Bill Hodges Trilogy Books In Publication Order

  1. Mr. Mercedes (2014)
  2. Finders Keepers (2015)
  3. End of Watch (2016)

The Button Box Books In Publication Order

  1. Gwendy’s Button Box (With: Richard T. Chizmar) (2017)
  2. Gwendy’s Magic Feather (By:Richard T. Chizmar) (2019)
  3. Gwendy’s Final Task (With: Richard T. Chizmar) (2022)

The Dark Tower Books In Publication Order

  1. The Gunslinger (1982)
  2. The Drawing of the Three (1987)
  3. The Waste Lands (1991)
  4. Wizard and Glass (1997)
  5. Wolves of the Calla (2003)
  6. Song of Susannah (2004)
  7. The Dark Tower (2004)
  8. The Wind Through the Keyhole (2012)

The Dark Tower: Beginnings Books In Publication Order

  1. The Gunslinger Born (By:Robin Furth,Peter David) (2007)
  2. The Long Road Home (By:Robin Furth,Peter David) (2008)
  3. Treachery (By:Robin Furth,Peter David) (2009)
  4. The Fall of Gilead (By:Robin Furth,Peter David) (2009)
  5. Battle of Jericho Hill (With: Robin Furth,Peter David) (2010)

The Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three Books In Publication Order

  1. The Prisoner (2020)
  2. House of Cards (2020)
  3. Lady of Shadows (2020)
  4. Bitter Medicine (2020)

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Books In Publication Order

  1. The Journey Begins (2019)
  2. The Little Sisters of Eluria (2019)
  3. The Battle of Tull (2019)
  4. The Way Station (2019)
  5. The Man in Black (2019)
  6. Last Shots (2019)

Green Mile Books In Publication Order

  1. The Two Dead Girls (1996)
  2. The Mouse on the Mile (1996)
  3. Coffey’s Hands (1996)
  4. Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix (1996)
  5. The Night Journey (1996)
  6. Coffey on the Mile (1996)

Secretary of Dreams Books In Publication Order

  1. The Secretary of Dreams (2006)
  2. The Secretary of Dreams Volume 2 (2010)

The Shining Books In Publication Order

  1. The Shining (1977)
  2. Doctor Sleep (2013)

Talisman Books In Publication Order

  1. The Talisman (1984)
  2. Black House (2001)

Standalone Novels In Publication Order

  1. Carrie (1974)
  2. Salems’s Lot (1975)
  3. Rage (As: Richard Bachman) (1977)
  4. The Stand (1978)
  5. The Long Walk (As: Richard Bachman) (1979)
  6. The Dead Zone (1979)
  7. Firestarter (1980)
  8. Roadwork (As: Richard Bachman) (1981)
  9. Cujo (1981)
  10. The Running Man (As: Richard Bachman) (1982)
  11. Christine (1983)
  12. Pet Sematary (1983)
  13. Thinner (As: Richard Bachman) (1984)
  14. It (1986)
  15. The Eyes of the Dragon (1987)
  16. Misery (1987)
  17. The Tommyknockers (1987)
  18. The Dark Half (1989)
  19. Needful Things (1991)
  20. Gerald’s Game (1992)
  21. Dolores Claiborne (1992)
  22. Insomnia (1994)
  23. Rose Madder (1995)
  24. Desperation (1996)
  25. The Regulators (As: Richard Bachman) (1996)
  26. Bag of Bones (1998)
  27. The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon (1999)
  28. Dreamcatcher (2001)
  29. From a Buick 8 (2002)
  30. The Colorado Kid (2005)
  31. Cell (2006)
  32. Lisey’s Story (2006)
  33. Blaze (As: Richard Bachman) (2007)
  34. Duma Key (2008)
  35. Under the Dome (2009)
  36. 11/22/63 (2011)
  37. Joyland (2013)
  38. Revival (2014)
  39. Sleeping Beauties (With: Owen King) (2017)
  40. The Outsider (2018)
  41. The Institute (2019)
  42. Later (2021)
  43. Billy Summers (2021)

Short Story Collections In Publication Order

  1. Night Shift (1978)
  2. Different Seasons (1982)
  3. Skeleton Crew (1985)
  4. Four Past Midnight (1990)
  5. Nightmares and Dreamscapes (1993)
  6. The Man in the Black Suit : 4 Dark Tales (1994)
  7. The Green Mile (1997)
  8. Six Stories (1997)
  9. Hearts in Atlantis (1999)
  10. Blood and Smoke (1999)
  11. Secret Windows: Essays and Fiction on the Craft of Writing (2000)
  12. Everything’s Eventual: 14 Dark Tales (2002)
  13. Just After Sunset (2008)
  14. Stephen King Goes to the Movies (2009)
  15. Full Dark, No Stars (2010)
  16. Road Rage (With: Joe Hill,Richard Matheson) (2012)
  17. The Bazaar of Bad Dreams (2018)
  18. If It Bleeds (2020)

Short Stories/Novellas In Publication Order

  1. Quitters, Inc. (1978)
  2. The Mist (1980)
  3. The Body (1982)
  4. The Shawshank Redemption (1982)
  5. Apt Pupil (1983)
  6. Cycle of the Werewolf (1983)
  7. Silver Bullet (1983)
  8. The Breathing Method (1984)
  9. Dolan’s Cadillac (1989)
  10. My Pretty Pony (1989)
  11. The Langoliers (1989)
  12. The Library Policeman (1990)
  13. The Sun Dog (1990)
  14. Secret Window, Secret Garden (1991)
  15. Three Carols (1991)
  16. Children of the Corn (1993)
  17. Umney’s Last Case (1995)
  18. Riding the Bullet (2000)
  19. LT’s Theory of Pets (2001)
  20. Stationary Bike (2006)
  21. The Gingerbread Girl (2008)
  22. UR (2009)
  23. 1922 (2010)
  24. Blockade Billy (2010)
  25. Mile 81 (2011)
  26. Throttle (With: Joe Hill) (2012)
  27. Stephen King’s Battleground (2012)
  28. A Face in the Crowd (With: Stewart O’Nan) (2012)
  29. Big Driver (2012)
  30. In the Tall Grass (With: Joe Hill) (2012)
  31. A Good Marriage (2014)
  32. Drunken Fireworks (2015)
  33. Elevation (2018)

Graphic Novels In Publication Order

  1. Creepshow (1982)
  2. The Talisman: Road of Trials (With: Peter Straub) (2009)
  3. The Dark Man: An Illustrated Poem (2013)
  4. Sleeping Beauties, Vol. 1 (2020)

Non-Fiction Books In Publication Order

  1. Stephen King’s Danse Macabre (1981)
  2. Danse Macabre (1981)
  3. Nightmares in the Sky: Gargoyles and Grotesques (1988)
  4. On Writing (1999)
  5. Faithful (2004)
  6. Guns (2013)
  7. Hearts in Suspension (2016)

Transgressions Books In Publication Order

  1. Transgressions (By:Ed McBain) (2006)
  2. Transgressions, Vol. 2 (With: Lawrence Block,Ed McBain,John Farris) (2006)

Plays In Publication Order

  1. Storm of the Century: An Original Screenplay (1999)
  2. Ghost Brothers of Darkland County (With: T. Bone Burnett) (2013)

Best American Short Stories Books In Publication Order

  1. The Best Short Stories of 1915 (1916)
  2. The Best Short Stories of 1916 (1916)
  3. The Best Short Stories of 1917 (1917)
  4. The Best Short Stories of 1918 (1918)
  5. The Best Short Stories of 1919 (1919)
  6. The Best Short Stories of 1921 (1921)
  7. The Best Short Stories of 1922 (1922)
  8. The Best Short Stories of 1923 (1923)
  9. The Best Short Stories 1924 (1924)
  10. The Best Short Stories of 1925 (1925)
  11. The Best Short Stories 1926 (1926)
  12. The Best Short Stories 1927 (1927)
  13. The Best Short Stories of 1928 (1928)
  14. The Best Short Stories of 1929 (1929)
  15. The Best Short Stories 1930 (1930)
  16. The Best Short Stories 1931 (1931)
  17. The Best Short Stories of 1932 (1932)
  18. The Best Short Stories 1933 (1933)
  19. The Best Short Stories 1934 (1934)
  20. The Best Short Stories 1935 (1935)
  21. The Best Short Stories 1936 (1936)
  22. The Best Short Stories 1937 (1937)
  23. The Best Short Stories of 1938 (1938)
  24. 50 Best American Short Stories, 1915-1939 (1939)
  25. The Best Short Stories 1939 (1939)
  26. The Best Short Stories of 1940 (1940)
  27. The Best Short Stories 1941 (1941)
  28. The Best American Short Stories 1942 (1942)
  29. The Best American Short Stories 1943 (1943)
  30. The Best American Short Stories 1944 (1944)
  31. The Best American Short Stories 1945 (1945)
  32. The Best American Short Stories 1946 (1946)
  33. The Best American Short Stories 1947 (1947)
  34. The Best American Short Stories 1948 (1948)
  35. The Best American Short Stories 1949 (1949)
  36. The Best American Short Stories 1950 (1950)
  37. The Best American Short Stories 1951 (1951)
  38. The Best American Short Stories 1952 (1952)
  39. The Best American Short Stories 1953 (1953)
  40. The Best American Short Stories 1955 (1955)
  41. The Best American Short Stories 1956 (1956)
  42. The Best American Short Stories 1957 (1957)
  43. The Best American Short Stories 1958 (1958)
  44. The Best American Short Stories 1959 (1959)
  45. The Best American Short Stories 1960 (1960)
  46. The Best American Short Stories 1961 (1961)
  47. The Best American Short Stories 1962 (1962)
  48. The Best American Short Stories 1963 (1963)
  49. The Best American Short Stories 1964 (1964)
  50. The Best American Short Stories 1965 (1965)
  51. The Best American Short Stories 1966 (1966)
  52. The Best American Short Stories 1967 (1967)
  53. The Best American Short Stories 1968 (1967)
  54. The Best American Short Stories of 1969 (1969)
  55. The Best American Short Stories 1970 (1970)
  56. The Best American Short Stories 1971 (1971)
  57. The Best American Short Stories 1972 (1972)
  58. The Best American Short Stories 1973 (1973)
  59. The Best American Short Stories 1974 (1974)
  60. The Best of Best American Short Stories 1915-1950 (1975)
  61. The Best American Short Stories 1975 (1975)
  62. The Best American Short Stories 1976 (1976)
  63. The Best American Short Stories 1977 (1977)
  64. The Best American Short Stories 1978 (1978)
  65. The Best American Short Stories 1979 (1979)
  66. The Best American Short Stories 1980 (1980)
  67. The Best American Short Stories 1981 (1981)
  68. The Best American Short Stories 1982 (1982)
  69. The Best American Short Stories 1983 (1983)
  70. The Best American Short Stories 1984 (1984)
  71. The Best American Short Stories 1985 (1985)
  72. The Best American Short Stories 1986 (1986)
  73. The Best American Short Stories 1987 (1987)
  74. The Best American Short Stories 1988 (1988)
  75. The Best American Short Stories 1989 (1989)
  76. The Best American Short Stories of the Eighties (1990)
  77. The Best American Short Stories 1990 (1990)
  78. The Best American Short Stories 1991 (1991)
  79. The Best American Short Stories 1992 (1992)
  80. The Best American Short Stories 1993 (1993)
  81. The Best American Short Stories 1994 (1994)
  82. The Best American Short Stories 1995 (1995)
  83. The Best American Short Stories 1996 (1996)
  84. The Best American Short Stories 1997 (1997)
  85. The Best American Short Stories 1998 (1998)
  86. The Best American Short Stories 1999 (1999)
  87. The Best American Short Stories 2000 (2000)
  88. The Best American Short Stories of the Century (2000)
  89. The Best American Short Stories 2001 (2001)
  90. The Best American Short Stories 2002 (2002)
  91. The Best American Short Stories 2003 (2003)
  92. The Best American Short Stories 2004 (2004)
  93. The Best American Short Stories 2005 (2005)
  94. The Best American Short Stories 2006 (2006)
  95. The Best American Short Stories 2007 (2007)
  96. The Best Short Stories of 1921, and the Yearbook of the American Short Story (2007)
  97. The Best American Short Stories1921 (2007)
  98. The Best American Short Stories 2008 (2008)
  99. The Best American Short Stories 2009 (2009)
  100. The Best American Short Stories 2010 (2010)
  101. The Best American Short Stories 2011 (2011)
  102. The Best American Short Stories 2012 (2012)
  103. The Best American Short Stories 2013 (2013)
  104. The Best American Short Stories 2014 (2014)
  105. The Best American Short Stories 2015 (2015)
  106. 100 Years of The Best American Short Stories (2015)
  107. The Best American Short Stories 2016 (2016)
  108. The Best American Short Stories 2017 (2017)
  109. The Best American Short Stories 2018 (2018)
  110. The Best American Short Stories 2019 (2019)
  111. The Best American Short Stories 2020 (2020)

Pan Book of Horror Stories Books In Publication Order

  1. The Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Jack Finney,Herbert van Thal) (1959)
  2. The First Pan Book Of Horror Stories (By:Bram Stoker,Herbert van Thal) (1959)
  3. The Third Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Herbert van Thal) (1962)
  4. The Fourth Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:,Herbert van Thal) (1963)
  5. The Fifth Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Herbert van Thal) (1964)
  6. 7THPAN BOOK OF HORROR STORIES (By:,Herbert van Thal) (1966)
  7. The Ninth Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Tanith Lee,,,,Herbert van Thal) (1968)
  8. The Tenth Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:,,,,Herbert van Thal) (1969)
  9. The Twelfth Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Patricia Highsmith,Herbert van Thal) (1971)
  10. The 13th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Herbert van Thal) (1972)
  11. The 14th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Herbert van Thal,,,,,Alex White) (1973)
  12. The 15th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:,Herbert van Thal,,,Alex White) (1974)
  13. The 16th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Alan Lee,,Herbert van Thal,,,,Elleston Trevor) (1975)
  14. The 17th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Alan Lee,Herbert van Thal,,Alex White,Elleston Trevor) (1976)
  15. The 18th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Patricia Highsmith,Herbert van Thal) (1977)
  16. The 19th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Robert Holdstock,,Herbert van Thal) (1978)
  17. The 20th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:,Herbert van Thal) (1979)
  18. The 22nd Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Herbert van Thal,,,Ian McEwan) (1981)
  19. The 23rd Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Ruth Rendell,,Herbert van Thal,,,,Alex White) (1982)
  20. The 24th Pan Book of Horror Stories (By:Patricia Highsmith,Roald Dahl,Herbert van Thal) (1983)
  21. The 25th Pan Book of Horror Stories (With: ,Herbert van Thal) (1984)

The Best Horror of the Year Anthology Books In Publication Order

  1. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume One (2009)
  2. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Two (2010)
  3. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Three (2011)
  4. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Four (2012)
  5. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Five (2013)
  6. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Six (2014)
  7. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Seven (2015)
  8. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Eight (2016)
  9. The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Nine (2017)
  10. The Best Horror of the Year Volume 10 (2018)
  11. The Best of the Best Horror of the Year: 10 Years of Essential Short Horror Fiction (2018)
  12. The Best Horror of the Year Volume 11 (2019)
  13. The Best Horror of the Year Volume 12 (2020)

Stewart O’Nan Short Stories/Novellas In Publication Order

  1. Last Night at the Lobster (By:Stewart O’Nan) (2007)
  2. Monsters (By:Stewart O’Nan) (2012)
  3. A Face in the Crowd (With: Stewart O’Nan) (2012)

Anthologies In Publication Order

  1. Shadows 4 (1960)
  2. Tales of Unknown Horror (1978)
  3. The Year’s Finest Fantasy (1978)
  4. The Year’s Best Horror Stories Series VII (1979)
  5. More Tales of Unknown Horror (1979)
  6. The Year’s Finest Fantasy 2 (1979)
  7. New Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos (1980)
  8. Dark Forces: New Stories of Suspense and Supernatural Horror (1980)
  9. New Terrors II (1980)
  10. The 21st Pan Book of Horror Stories (1980)
  11. Fantasy Annual 3 (1981)
  12. Dark Love (1981)
  13. The Giant Book Of Horror Stories (1981)
  14. Shadows (1981)
  15. Fantasy Annual IV (1981)
  16. Modern Masters of Horror (1981)
  17. The Science Fiction Weight Loss Book (1983)
  18. Realms of Darkness (1985)
  19. The Year’s Best Horror Stories (1985)
  20. Horrors (1986)
  21. The Dark Descent (1987)
  22. A Treasury of American Horror Stories (1988)
  23. Prime Evil (1988)
  24. Dark Visions (1988)
  25. THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF SHORT HORROR NOVELS (1988)
  26. Book of the Dead (1989)
  27. Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos (1990)
  28. Dark Voices: No. 1 (1990)
  29. Horrorstory (1991)
  30. The Horror Hall of Fame (1991)
  31. I Shudder at Your Touch: Twenty Two Tales of Sex and Horror (1991)
  32. Midnight Graffiti (1992)
  33. Young Blood (1994)
  34. Mid-life Confidential: The Rock Bottom Remainders Tour America with Three Chords and an Attitude (1994)
  35. The Puffin Book of Horror Stories (1994)
  36. The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighth Annual Collection (1995)
  37. The Vampire Omnibus (1995)
  38. Space Movies (1995)
  39. Horror Stories (1995)
  40. The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror: Ninth Annual Collection (1996)
  41. Twists of the Tale: An Anthology of Cat Horror (1996)
  42. American Gothic Tales (1996)
  43. Blood Thirst (1997)
  44. Robert Bloch’s Psychos (1997)
  45. The Best of the Best (1998)
  46. The Playboy Book of Science Fiction (1998)
  47. Eternal Lovecraft: The Persistence of HPL in Popular Culture (1998)
  48. Scary! Stories That Will Make You Scream! (1999)
  49. 999: New Stories of Horror and Suspense (1999)
  50. Vintage Science Fiction (1999)
  51. The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror: Twelfth Annual Collection (1999)
  52. Technohorror: Inventions in Terror (1999)
  53. The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century (2000)
  54. A Century of Great Suspense Stories (2001)
  55. In the Shadow of the Master (2003)
  56. The Future Dictionary of America (2004)
  57. Transgressions (2005)
  58. Transgressions, Vol. 2 (2006)
  59. Dancing with the Dark (2009)
  60. Crucified Dreams (2011)
  61. Hard Listening: The Greatest Rock Band Ever (of Authors) Tells All (2013)
  62. Turn Down the Lights (2013)
  63. Field of Fantasies: Baseball Stories of the Strange and Supernatural (2014)
  64. Chiral Mad 3 (2016)
  65. Six Scary Stories (2016)
  66. Grave Predictions (2016)
  67. The Best American Mystery Stories 2016 (2016)
  68. In Sunlight or In Shadow: Stories Inspired by the Paintings of Edward Hopper (2016)
  69. Detours (2016)
  70. It Came From The Garage!: An Anthology of Automotive Horror (2019)
  71. Flight or Fright (2019)

Bill Hodges Trilogy Book Covers

The Button Box Book Covers

The Dark Tower Book Covers

The Dark Tower: Beginnings Book Covers

The Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three Book Covers

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Book Covers

Green Mile Book Covers

Secretary of Dreams Book Covers

The Shining Book Covers

Talisman Book Covers

Standalone Novels Book Covers

Short Story Collections Book Covers

Short Stories/Novellas Book Covers

Graphic Novels Book Covers

Non-Fiction Book Covers

Transgressions Book Covers

Plays Book Covers

Best American Short Stories Book Covers

Pan Book of Horror Stories Book Covers

The Best Horror of the Year Anthology Book Covers

Stewart O’Nan Short Stories/Novellas Book Covers

Anthologies Book Covers

Stephen King Books Overview

The Gunslinger

Now Available in a box set the first four Dark Tower Books with new material from the author! The Gunslinger The Drawing of the Three The Waste Lands Wizard and Glass In this brilliant series, Stephen King introduced readers to one of his most enigmatic heroes, Roland of Gilead, The Last Gunslinger. Roland’s quest for the Dark Tower took readers on a wildly epic ride through parallel worlds and across time. A classic tale of colossal scope crossing over terrain from The Stand, The Eyes of the Dragon, Insomnia, The Talisman, Black House, Hearts in Atlantis, Salem’s Lot, and other familiar King haunts the adventure took hold with the turn of each page…
In a major publishing event, the quest for the Dark Tower continues in Wolves of the Calla Volume V, Song of Susannah Volume VI, and The Dark Tower Volume VII, coming from Scribner, beginning in November 2003. Now readers can go back to where it all began with this box set of the first four Dark Tower titles, each featuring a new packaging and new introduction. Plus Book I, The Gunslinger, has been completely revised and expanded throughout.

The Drawing of the Three

Beginning with a short story appearing in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1978, the publication of Stephen King’s epic work of fantasy what he considers to be a single long novel and his magnum opus has spanned a quarter of a century. Set in a world of extraordinary circumstances, filled with stunning visual imagery and unforgettable characters, The Dark Tower series is King’s most visionary feat of storytelling, a magical mix of science fiction, fantasy, and horror that may well be his crowning achievement.

In November 2003, the fifth installment, Wolves of the Calla, will be published under the imprint of Donald M. Grant, with distribution and major promotion provided by Scribner. Song of Susannah, Book VI, and The Dark Tower, Book VII, will follow under the same arrangement in 2004. With these last three volumes finally on the horizon, readers countless King readers who have yet to delve into The Dark Tower and a multitude of new and old fantasy fans can now look forward to reading the series straight through to its stunning conclusion. Viking’s elegant reissue of the first four books ensures that for the first time The Dark Tower will be widely available in hardcover editions for this eager readership.

Beginning with a short story appearing in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1978, the publication of Stephen King’s epic work of fantasy what he considers to be a single long novel and his magnum opus has spanned a quarter of a century.

Set in a world of extraordinary circumstances, filled with stunning visual imagery and unforgettable characters, The Dark Tower series is King’s most visionary feat of storytelling, a magical mix of science fiction, fantasy, and horror that may well be his crowning achievement. In November 2003, the fifth installment, Wolves of the Calla, will be published under the imprint of Donald M. Grant, with distribution and major promotion provided by Scribner. Song of Susannah, Book VI, and The Dark Tower, Book VII, will follow under the same arrangement in 2004. With these last three volumes finally on the horizon, readers countless King readers who have yet to delve into The Dark Tower and a multitude of new and old fantasy fans can now look forward to reading the series straight through to its stunning conclusion. Viking’s elegant reissue of the first four books ensures that for the first time The Dark Tower will be widely available in hardcover editions for this eager readership.

Wolves of the Calla

Roland Deschain and his ka tet are bearing southeast through the forests of Mid World, the almost timeless landscape that seems to stretch from the wreckage of civility that defined Roland’s youth to the crimson chaos that seems the future’s only promise.

Followers of Stephen King’s epic series know Roland well, or as well as this enigmatic hero can be known. They also know the companions who have been drawn to his quest for the Dark Tower: Eddie Dean and his wife, Susannah; Jake Chambers, the boy who has come twice through the doorway of death into Roland’s world; and Oy, the Billy Bumbler.

In this long awaited fifth novel in the saga, their path takes them to the outskirts of Calla Bryn Sturgis, a tranquil valley community of farmers and ranchers on Mid World’s borderlands. Beyond the town the rocky ground rises towards the hulking darkness of Thunderclap, the source of a terrible affliction that is slowly stealing the community’s soul. One of the town’s residents is Pere Callahan, a ruined priest who, like Susannah, Eddie and Jake, passed through one of the portals that lead both into and out of Roland’s world.

As Father Callahan tells the ka tet the astonishing story of what happened following his shamed departure from Maine in 1977, his connection to the Dark Tower becomes clear, as does the danger facing a single red rose in a vacant lot off Second Avenue in midtown Manhattan. For Calla Bryn Sturgis, danger gathers in the east like a storm cloud. The Wolves of Thunderclap and their unspeakable depredation are coming. To resist them is to risk all, but these are odds the gunslingers are used to, and they can give the Calla folken both courage and cunning. Their guns, however, will not be enough.

Song of Susannah

The next to last novel in Stephen King’s seven volume magnum opus, Song of Susannah is a fascinating key to the unfolding mystery of the Dark Tower. To give birth to her ‘chap,’ demon mother Mia has usurped the body of Susannah Dean and used the power of Black Thirteen to transport to New York City in the summer of 1999. The city is strange to Susannah…
and terrifying to the ‘daughter of none’ who shares her body and mind. Saving the Tower depends not only on rescuing Susannah but also on securing the vacant lot Calvin Tower owns before he loses it to the Sombra Corporation. Enlisting the aid of Manni senders, the remaining ka tet climbs to the Doorway Cave…
and discovers that magic has its own mind.

It falls to the boy, the billy bumbler, and the fallen priest to find Susannah Mia, who in a struggle to cope with each other and with an alien environment ‘go todash’ to Castle Discordia on the border of End World. In that forsaken place, Mia reveals her origins, her purpose, and her fierce desire to mother whatever creature the two of them have carried to term. Eddie and Roland, meanwhile, tumble into western Maine in the summer of 1977, a world that should be idyllic but isn’t. For one thing, it is real, and the bullets are flying. For another, it is inhabited by the author of a novel called Salem’s Lot, a writer who turns out to be as shocked by them as they are by him.

The Dark Tower

All good things must come to an end, Constant Listener, and not even Stephen King can write a story that goes on forever. The tale of Roland Deschain’s relentless quest for The Dark Tower has, the author fears, sorely tried the patience of those who have followed it from its earliest chapters. But attend to it a while longer, if it pleases you, for this volume is the last, and often the last things are best.

Roland’s ka tet remains intact, though scattered over wheres and whens. Susannah Mia has been carried from the Dixie Pig in the summer of 1999 to a birthing room really a chamber of horrors in Thunderclap’s Fedic Station; Jake and Father Callahan, with Oy between them, have entered the restaurant on Lex and 61st with weapons drawn, little knowing how numerous and noxious are their foes. Roland and Eddie are with John Cullum in Maine, in 1977, looking for the site on Turtleback Lane where ‘walk ins’ have been often seen. They want desperately to get back to the others, to Susannah especially, and yet they have come to realize that the world they need to escape is the only one that matters.

Thus the audiobook opens, like a door to the uttermost reaches of Stephen King’s imagination. You’ve come this far. Come a little farther. Come all the way. The sound you hear may be the slamming of the door behind you. Welcome to The Dark Tower.

The Wind Through the Keyhole

For those discovering the epic bestselling Dark Tower series for the first time and for its legions of dedicated fans an immensely satisfying stand alone novel and perfect introduction to the series. Beginning in 1974, gaining momentum in the 1980s and coming to a thrilling conclusion when the last three novels were published in 2003 2004, the Dark Tower epic fantasy saga stands as Stephen King’s most beguiling achievement.

It has been the basis for a long-running Marvel comic series. Now, with The Wind Through the Keyhole, King has returned to the rich landscape of Mid World. This story within story within a story finds Roland Deschain, Mid World s last gunslinger, in his early days during the guilt-ridden year following his mother s death. Sent by his father to investigate evidence of a murderous shape shifter, a skin man, Roland takes charge of Bill Streeter, a brave but terrified boy who is the sole surviving witness to the beast s most recent slaughter. Roland, himself only a teenager, calms the boy by reciting a story from the Book of Eld that his mother used to read to him at bedtime. A person s never too old for stories, he says to Bill. Man and boy, girl and woman, we live for them.’ Sure to captivate the avid fans of the Dark Tower epic, this is an enchanting introduction to Roland s world and the power of Stephen King s storytelling magic.

The Gunslinger Born (By:Robin Furth,Peter David)

‘The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.’ With those words, millions of readers have been introduced to Stephen King’s Roland an implacable gunslinger in search of the enigmatic Dark Tower, powering his way through a dangerous land filled with ancient technology and deadly magic.

Now, in a comic book personally overseen by King himself, Roland’s past is revealed! Sumptuously drawn by Jae Lee and Richard Isanove, adapted by long time Stephen King expert Robin Furth author of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower: A Concordance and scripted by New York Times Bestseller Peter David, this series delves deep into Roland’s origins the perfect introduction to this incredibly realized world, while long time fans will thrill to adventures merely hinted at in the novels. Be there for the very beginning of a modern classic of fantasy literature!

Waiting for the fall…
How could you have done it, Roland? How could you have killed your own mother? That’s what everyone in Gilead’s asking even your grieving father. But you know the answer: Marten Broadcloak and one of them evil grapefruits. That’s how. And while you rot in jail, the plot your matricide was only one small part of is wrapping its bloody and black tendrils around Gilead. Your town the home of the Gunslingers is the prize possession of the great enemy of the land, John Farson. And he means to have it. Gilead will fall, it will. And it will fall to the death of a thousand cuts. It started with your mother, yes, but it won’t end there.

The Two Dead Girls

The Green Mile tells the story of two men, a prison guard and his new death row inmate, and their suddenly intertwined lives. What would it be like to walk those last 40 yards to the electric chair, knowing you were going to die there? What would it be like to be the man who had to strap the condemned man in or pull the switch? What would such a job take out of you, or even add? The Green Mile takes readers deep inside this world, and into the psyches of two men at pivotal points in their lives.

It’s funny where an idea, a chance remark, can lead you. Friendly conversation about books will almost certainly lead you to Charles Dickens, and how his novels were once serialized, with readers eagerly awaiting the publication of the next installment. With few exceptions, this was a concept not attempted since the Dickens era. But now comes The Green Mile, a multi-part novel that will be published in monthly installments. National ads/media.

The Mouse on the Mile

This is the second volume of a serial novel by Stephen King, set on Death Row of a southern American prison.

Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix

Time runs out for one of the inmates on death row at Cold Mountain penitentiary.

The Night Journey

Paul Edgecombe and his fellow guards take a huge gamble by taking convicted killer John Coffey away from Death Row in the dead of night to bring him to the bedside of a woman writhing in torment.

Coffey on the Mile

Cold Mountain Penitentiary has seen its share of death through the years, and now it’s John Coffey’s turn to take that final walk down the Green Mile.

‘YOU’RE THE CARETAKER, SIR. YOU’VE ALWAYS BEEN THE CARETAKER. I SHOULD KNOW, SIR. I’VE ALWAYS BEEN HERE…
.’ DELBERT GRADY OF THE OVERLOOK HOTEL The Shining First published in 1977, The Shining quickly became a benchmark in the literary career of Stephen King. This tale of a troubled man hired to care for a remote mountain resort over the winter, his loyal wife, and their uniquely gifted son slowly but steadily unfolds as secrets from the Overlook Hotel’s past are revealed, and the hotel itself attempts to claim the very souls of the Torrence family. Adapted into a cinematic masterpiece of horror by legendary Stanley Kubrick featuring an unforgettable performance by a demonic Jack Nicholson The Shining stands as a cultural icon of modern horror, a searing study of a family torn apart, and a nightmarish glimpse into the dark recesses of human weakness and dementia.

Doctor Sleep

Mass Market Paperback, Simon & Schuster Export

The Talisman

To coincide with the publication of Stephen King and Peter Straub’s extraordinary new thriller, BLACK HOUSE, here is the story that started it all. On a brisk autumn day, a twelve-year-old boy stands on the shores of the gray Atlantic, near a silent amusement park and a fading ocean resort called the Alhambra. The past has driven Jack Sawyer here: his father is gone, his mother is dying, and the world no longer makes sense. But for Jack everything is about to change. For he has been chosen to make a journey back across America and into another realm. One of the most influential and heralded works of fantasy ever written, The Talisman is an extraordinary novel of loyalty, awakening, terror, and mystery. Jack Sawyer, on a desperate quest to save his mother’s life, must search for a prize across an epic landscape of innocents and monsters, of incredible dangers and even more incredible truths. The prize is essential, but the journey means even more. Let the quest begin…
.

Black House

The Washington PostOn a brisk autumn day, a thirteen-year-old boy stands on the shores of the gray Atlantic, near a silent amusement park and a fading ocean resort called the Alhambra. The past has driven Jack Sawyer here: his father is gone, his mother is dying, and the world no longer makes sense. But for Jack everything is about to change. For he has been chosen to make a journey back across America and into another realm. One of the most influential and heralded works of fantasy ever written, The Talisman is an extraordinary novel of loyalty, awakening, terror, and mystery. Jack Sawyer, on a desperate quest to save his mother’s life, must search for a prize across an epic landscape of innocents and monsters, of incredible dangers and even more incredible truths. The prize is essential, but the journey means even more. Let the quest begin…

It s a relief to find popular fiction that is as unpretentious yet rich in literary allusion and human detail as Black House. The Wall Street JournalJack Sawyer is a retired Los Angeles homicide detective living in the small hamlet of Tamarak, Wisconsin. He has no recollection of the events twenty years ago that led him to a parallel universe called the Territories to save his mother from certain death.

When a series of gruesome murders occur in western Wisconsin, Jack s buddy, the local chief of police, begs Jack to help the inexperienced force find the killer. As cryptic messages in Jack s waking dreams become increasingly impossible to ignore, he is drawn back to the Territories and to his own hidden past, where he must find the soul strength to enter a terrifying house at the end of a deserted tract of forest and to encounter the obscene and ferocious evils sheltered within it. JACK S SAGA OVERFLOWS WITH DARK WIT, SLY LITERARY REFERENCES, SUSPENSE, AND HEARTACHE. What elevates Black House beyond ordinary horror novels is the richness of its cast. The New York Times Book Review HUGELY PLEASURABLE…
Black House allows us to see two master craftsmen, each at the top of his game. The Washington Post Book WorldCOVER IIBlack HouseSEPTEMBER 2002 MM

Carrie

Since the publication of Carrie in 1974, neither misfit Carrie White nor her catastrophic high school prom has been forgotten. That’s because the story of Carrie, her extraordinary telekinetic powers, and her violent rampage of revenge introduced a fresh and distinctive new voice in American fiction Stephen King.

Although Carrie first captured America’s attention with its shocking climax, it remains as vibrant today as when it was first published because of Stephen King’s ability to tap the collective unconscious of our commercial society. He brilliantly underscores the inherent fears and driving forces that fester in adolescence and later manifest themselves in various forms. Whether it’s public high school’s proclivity for suppressing individualism and creativity, the bigotry of cliques, or male apprehension of women’s emerging sexuality and equality, Carrie lays bare our ritualistic, cruel, and base tendencies. Ultimately, we discern that it’s not Carrie White but the ineffectual people surrounding her that we truly dread which is why Carrie endures as one of Stephen King’s most riveting and disturbing novels.

Salems’s Lot

Upon its initial publication in 1975, Salem’s Lot was recognized as a landmark work. The novel has sold millions of copies in various editions, but it wasn’t until Centipede Press published a special limited edition in 2004 that King s masterpiece was brought to brilliant and eerie life.

With the addition of fifty pages of material deleted from the 1975 manuscript as well as material that has since been modified by King, an introduction by him, and two short stories related to the events of the novel, this edition represents the text as the author envisioned it. Centipede s deluxe edition, of which only 900 copies were printed, features lavishly creepy photographs by acclaimed photographer Jerry Uelsmann, printed interior endpapers, and a stunning page design. Doubleday is proud to make this volume, printed from the original design of the Centipede Press edition, available to the general reader. No King aficionado s library will be complete without owning this definitive illustrated edition of the great Salem s Lot.

Rage (As: Richard Bachman)

Four of Richard Bachman’s eerie works are gathered here in a posthumous edition. They are Rage, a story of stunning psychological horror about an ‘estra’ ordinary high school student; ‘The Long Walk,’ a contest with death; ‘Roadwork, a strange variation on the theme of ‘Home Sweet Home’; and ‘The Running Man,’ where you bet your life literally.

The Stand

This is the way the world ends: with a nanosecond of computer error in a Defense Department laboratory and a million casual contacts that form the links in a chain letter of death. And here is the bleak new world of the day after: a world stripped of its institutions and emptied of 99 percent of its people. A world in which a handful of panicky survivors choose sides or are chosen. A world in which good rides on the frail shoulders of the 108-year-old Mother Abigail and the worst nightmares of evil are embodied in a man with a lethal smile and unspeakable powers: Randall Flagg, the dark man.

In 1978 Stephen King published The Stand, the novel that is now considered to be one of his finest works. But as it was first published, The Stand was incomplete, since more than 150,000 words had been cut from the original manuscript. Now Stephen King’s apocalyptic vision of a world blasted by plague and embroiled in an elemental struggle between good and evil has been restored to its entirety.

The Stand : The Complete And Uncut Edition includes more than five hundred pages of material previously deleted, along with new material that King added as he reworked the manuscript for a new generation. It gives us new characters and endows familiar ones with new depths. It has a new beginning and a new ending. What emerges is a gripping work with the scope and moral complexity of a true epic. For hundreds of thousands of fans who read The Stand in its original version and wanted more, this new edition is Stephen King’s gift. And those who are reading The Stand for the first time will discover a triumphant and eerily plausible work of the imagination that takes on the issues that will determine our survival.

The Long Walk (As: Richard Bachman)

Unabridged CDs, 8 CDs, 10 hours Read by TBA On the first day of May, 100 teenage boys meet for a race known as ‘The Long Walk’. If you break the rules, you get three warnings. If you exceed your limit, what happens is absolutely terrifying.

The Dead Zone

John Smith awakes from a coma to find his life in ruins. He also finds that he can see the future a power he doesn’t want but can’t escape. He is branded a freak and his warnings of danger are seen as ravings, and when he shakes a psychopathic politician’s hand he foresees unimaginable horror.

Firestarter

Unabridged CDs, 16 CDs, 13 hoursCharlie McGee inherited pyrokinetic powers from her parents, who had been given a low-grade hallucinogen called ‘Lot Six’ while at college. Now the government is trying to capture young Charlie and harness her powerful fire-starting skills as a weapon.

Roadwork (As: Richard Bachman)

Unabridged CDs, 7 CDs, 9 hours. When a highway project puts Barton Dawes out of work and threatens to destroy his home, he has more than enough time on his hands to plot his revenge. Driving his wife and friends away with his obstinate refusal to give in, he pushes the powers that be to the limit, taking a stand against what he sees as a criminal act in progress.

Cujo

Unabridged CDs, 10 CDs, 12 hours Read by TBA Left to fend for herself by her workaholic husband, Donna Trenton takes her ailing Pinto to Joe Cambers’s garage for repairs only to be trapped with her son, Tad, in the sweltering car by the Cambers’s once friendly Saint Bernard, Cujo, now a monstrous and rabid killer.

The Running Man (As: Richard Bachman)

Set in the year 2025, The Running Man is a frightening tale of a sick society, fascinated by bloodthirsty game shows where desperate individuals wager their lives for a shot at fabulous riches. From The Bachman Books by Stephen King writing as Richard Bachman. Arnold Schwarzenegger stars in the film version due to open mid July. Includes 8 pages of photos from the movie. Movie/Tie in

Christine

Unabridged CDs, 15 CDs, 19 hours Read by TBA From the moment seventeen year old Arnie Cunningham saw Christine, he knew he would do anything to possess her. But Christine is no lady. She is Stephen King’s ultimate vehicle of terror.

Pet Sematary

AN ADAPTION BY BBC RADIO BASED ON STEPHEN KING’S Pet Sematary A Fully Dramatized Multi Voice Presentation Dr. Louis Creed and his wife Rachel chose rural Maine to settle his family and bring up their children. It was a better place than smog-covered Chicago or so he thought. But that was before he became acquainted with the old pet burial ground located in the backwoods of the quiet community of Ludlow. The place has the power it seeps into your dreams and you wake up sweating with fear. It is a place that strikes dread into the lives of all who share its secrets. A fully dramatized BBC presentation of one of Stephen King’s most famous bestsellers, Pet Sematary is a masterpiece of the macabre and an unforgettable audio experience!

Thinner (As: Richard Bachman)

When an old Gypsy man curses Billy Halleck for sideswiping his daughter, six weeks later he’s 93 pounds lighter. Now Billy is terrified. And desperate enough for one last gamble…
that will lead him to a nightmare showdown with the forces of evil melting his flesh away.

It

To the children, the town was their whole world. To the adults, knowing better, Derry Maine was just their hometown: familiar, well ordered for the most part. A good place to live. It was the children who saw and felt what made Derry so horribly different. In the storm drains, in the sewers, IT lurked, taking on the shape of every nightmare, each one’s deepest dread. Sometimes IT reached up, seizing, tearing, killing…

The adults, knowing better, knew nothing. Time passed and the children grew up, moved away. The horror of IT was deep-buried, wrapped in forgetfulness. Until they were called back, once more to confront IT as IT stirred and coiled in the sullen depths of their memories, reaching up again to make their past nightmares a terrible present reality.

The Eyes of the Dragon

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. Flagg, an evil court magician, frames Prince Peter for the death of his father, King Roland. While Peter is imprisoned, Flagg takes over the kingdom by influencing Peter’s younger brother, Prince Thomas, who is now reluctantly king by default.

Misery

Thrown from the wreckage of his ’74 Camaro, Paul Sheldon, author of a bestselling series of historical romances, wakes up one day in a secluded Colorado farmhouse owned by Annie Wilkes, a psychotic ex-nurse who claims she is his number one fan. Immobilized from the pain of two shattered legs and a crushed knee, Sheldon is at Annie’s mercy. Unfortunately for Sheldon, Annie is mad; mad that he killed off her favorite character, Misery Chastain, in his latest book; mad that he wants to escape; and of course, mad in the most extreme clinical sense of the word. To set the world straight, Annie buys Sheldon a typewriter and some paper, drugs him, locks him in a room, and forces him to bring Misery back to life in a novel dedicated to her. Fear of physical torture is Sheldon’s greatest motivation. One wrong sentence and she is likely to smash his legs with a sledgehammer, cut his thumbs off with a hacksaw, or much, much worse. But writers have weapons too…
.

The Tommyknockers

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. Roberta Anderson, while searching for firewood in the forest, stumbles upon a buried ship and with the help of her onetime lover, Jim Gardener, excavates an artifact that changes the townspeople of Haven.

The Dark Half

Thad Beaumont would like to say he is innocent. He’d like to say he has nothing to do with the series of monstrous murders that keep coming closer to his home. He’d like to say he has nothing to do with the twisted imagination that produced his bestselling novels. He’d like to say he has nothing to do with the voice on the phone uttering its obscene threats and demanding total surrender. But how can Thad disown the ultimate embodiment of evil that goes by the name he gave it and signs its crimes with Thad’s bloody fingerprints?

Needful Things

A new store has opened in the town of Castle Rock, Maine. It has whatever your heart desires…
if you’re willing to pay the price. In this chilling novel by one of the most potent imaginations of our time, evil is on a shopping spree and out to scare you witless. Presented unabridged and read by the author.

Gerald’s Game

On a warm October day, Jessie Burlingame lies in the bedroom of her secluded lake home, listening to the far off sounds of the country; the cry of a loon, the growl of a chain saw, the bark of a lonesome dog. Nearer, she hears the banging of the screen door, left unlatched in the autumn breeze; nearer still, the click of the key locking the second pair of handcuffs that chain her to the bed. Gerald Burlingame, her husband of 17 years, looms over her, grin on his face, gleam in his eye, lust in his heart. This is Gerald’s favorite game little kinky, perhaps, but all in good fun. And then, quite suddenly, the fun is over. Gerald’s heart fails him in the heat of passion, leaving Jessie hideously trapped and dreadfully alone. As darkness gathers in the room that is now Jessie’s whole world, she must face not only the terror of never escaping, but the most excruciating truths about her life: the murky secrets that brought her here in the first place.

Dolores Claiborne

Dolores Claiborne is a tough, proud, 65 year old Yankee, the sort of woman who tolerates no monkey business from anybody or so it seems to the outside world. But she’s just been accused of killing her employer, and as she begins to tell her story, we realize with fascination and horror that there is much more to this woman than meets the eye.

Insomnia

Ralph Roberts has an incurable case of Insomnia, but lack of sleep is the least of his worries. Each night he stays awake, he witnesses more of the odd activity taking place in his town after dark than he wants to know. The nice young chemist up the street beats his wife and has delusions about beings he calls ‘The Centurions.’ A madman with a knife is trying to kill him, he’s sure. And on the night May Locher died, one of the two bald men coming out of her house had a pair of scissors in his hand.

What does it all mean? Ralph doesn’t quite know. But the bizarre visions he’s been having keep getting more intense, the strange deaths in Derry have just begun, and Ralph knows he isn’t hallucinating. Returning to the town of Derry, Maine, the setting of one of his most critically acclaimed novels, It, Stephen King combines bone-chilling realism with supernatural terror to create yet another masterpiece of suspense.

Rose Madder

Roused by a single drop of blood, Rosie Daniels wakes up to the chilling realization that her husband is going to kill her. And she takes flight with his credit card. Alone in a strange city, Rosie begins to build a new life: she meets Bill Steiner and she finds an old junk shop painting, Rose Madder , which strangely seems to want her as much as she wants it. But it’s hard for Rosie not to keep looking over her shoulder. Rose is maddened and on the rampage, Norman is a corrupt cop with a dog s instinct for tracking people. And he s getting close. Rosie can feel just how close he is getting A brilliant dark-hued fable of gender wars, a haunting love story, and a hold your breath triumph of suspense, Rose Madder is Stephen King at his electrifying best.

Desperation

Welcome to Desperation. Once a thriving copper mining town in the middle of the Nevada desert, Desperation is now eerily abandoned. It’s the last place that travelers like the Carver family, bound for vacation, and writer Johnny Marinville, astride his Harley, would expect to be stopped and charged. But Desperation still has a local cop a unique regulator who patrols the wilderness highway. The secrets buried in Desperation are as terrifying as the forces summoned to encounter them. A terrifying transformation is taking place and the travelers will soon discover the true meaning of Desperation

The Regulators (As: Richard Bachman)

There’s a place in Wentworth, Ohio, where summer is in full swing. It’s called Poplar Street. Up until now it’s been a nice place to live. The idling red van around the corner is about to change all that. Let the battle against evil begin. Here come ‘The Regulators’. ‘Call him Bachman or call him King…
. He hits hard with a white knuckler knockout. A devilishly entertaining yarn of occult mayhem and mordant social commentary…
a paragon of action horror’. ‘Publishers Weekly’.

Bag of Bones

Stephen King’s most gripping and unforgettable novel, Bag of Bones, is a story of grief and a lost love’s enduring bonds, of a new love haunted by the secrets of the past, of an innocent child caught in a terrible crossfire. Set in the Maine territory King has made mythic, Bag of Bones recounts the plight of forty year old bestselling novelist Mike Noonan, who is unable to stop grieving even four years after the sudden death of his wife, Jo, and who can no longer bear to face the blank screen of his word processor.

Now his nights are plagued by vivid nightmares of the house by the lake. Despite these dreams, or perhaps because of them, Mike finally returns to Sara Laughs, the Noonans’ isolated summer home. He finds his beloved Yankee town familiar on its surface, but much changed underneath held in the grip of a powerful millionaire, Max Devore, who twists the very fabric of the community to his purpose: to take his three year old granddaughter away from her widowed young mother.

As Mike is drawn into their struggle, as he falls in love with both of them, he is also drawn into the mystery of Sara Laughs, now the site of ghostly visitations, ever escalating nightmares, and the sudden recovery of his writing ability. What are the forces that have been unleashed here and what do they want of Mike Noonan? As vivid and enthralling as King’s most enduring works, Bag of Bones resonates with what Amy Tan calls ‘the witty and obsessive voice of King’s powerful imagination.’ It’s no secret that King is our most mesmerizing storyteller. In Bag of Bones described by Gloria Naylor as ‘a love story about the dark places within us all’ he proves to be one of our most moving.

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

What if the woods were full of them? And of course, they were, the woods were full of everything you didn’t like, everything you were afraid of and instinctively loathed, everything that tried to overwhelm you with nasty, no brain panic. The brochure promised a ‘moderate to difficult’ six mile hike on the Maine New Hampshire branch of the Appalachian Trail, where nine year old Trisha McFarland was to spend Saturday with her older brother, Pete, and her recently divorced mother.

When she wanders off to escape their constant bickering, then tries to catch up by attempting a shortcut through the woods, Trisha strays deeper into a wilderness full of peril and terror. Especially when night falls. Trisha has only her wits for navigation, only her ingenuity as a defense against the elements, only her courage and faith to withstand her mounting fear. For solace she tunes her Walkman to broadcasts of Boston Red Sox games and the gritty performances of her hero, number 36, relief pitcher Tom Gordon. And when her radio’s reception begins to fade, Trisha imagines that Tom Gordon is with her key to surviving an enemy known only by the slaughtered animals and mangled trees in its wake. A classic story that engages our emotions at the most primal level, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon explores our deep dread of the unknown and the extent to which faith can conquer it. It is a fairy tale grimmer than Grimm, but aglow with a girl’s indomitable spirit.

Dreamcatcher

Once upon a time, in the haunted city of Derry site of the classics It and Insomnia, four boys stood together and did a brave thing. Certainly a good thing; perhaps even a great thing. Something that changed them in ways they could never begin to understand.

Twenty five years later, the boys are now men with separate lives and separate troubles. But the ties endure. Each hunting season the foursome reunites in the woods of Maine. This year, a stranger stumbles into their camp, disoriented, mumbling something about lights in the sky. His incoherent ravings prove to be disturbingly prescient. Before long, these men will be plunged into a horrifying struggle with a creature form another world. Their only chance of survival is locked in their shared past and in the Dreamcatcher.

Stephen King’s first full length novel since Bag of Bones is, more than anything, a story of how men remember, and how they find their courage. Not since The Stand has King crafted a story of such astonishing range and never before has he contended so frankly with the heart of darkness. /Content /EditorialReview EditorialReview Source Amazon. com Review /Source Content Stephen King fans, rejoice! The bodysnatching aliens tale Dreamcatcher is his first book in years that slakes our hunger for horror the way he used to. A throwback to It, The Stand, and The Tommyknockers, Dreamcatcher is also an interesting new wrinkle in his fiction.

Four boyhood pals in Derry, Maine, get together for a pilgrimage to their favorite deep woods cabin, Hole in the Wall. The four have been telepathically linked since childhood, thanks to a searing experience involving a Down syndrome neighbor a human Dreamcatcher. They’ve all got midlife crises: clownish Beav has love problems; the intellectual shrink, Henry, is slowly succumbing to the siren song of suicide; Pete is losing a war with beer; Jonesy has had weird premonitions ever since he got hit by a car.

Then comes worse trouble: an old man named McCarthy a nod to the star of the 1956 film Invasion of the Body Snatchers turns up at Hole in the Wall. His body is erupting with space aliens resembling furry moray eels: their mouths open to reveal nests of hatpin like teeth. Poor Pete tries to remove one that just bit his ankle: ‘Blood flew in splattery fans as Pete tried to shake it off, stippling the snow and the sawdusty tarp and the dead woman’s parka. Droplets flew into the fire and hissed like fat in a hot skillet.’

For all its nicely described mayhem, Dreamcatcher is mostly a psychological drama. Typically, body snatchers turn humans into zombies, but these aliens must share their host’s mind, fighting for control. Jonesy is especially vulnerable to invasion, thanks to his hospital bed near death transformation, but he’s also great at messing with the alien’s head. While his invading alien, Mr. Gray, is distracted by puppeteering Jonesy’s body as he’s driving an Arctic Cat through a Maine snowstorm, Jonesy constructs a mental warehouse along the lines of The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci. Jonesy physically feels as if he’s inside a warehouse, locked behind a door with the alien rattling the doorknob and trying to trick him into letting him in. It’s creepy from the alien’s view, too. As he infiltrates Jonesy, experiencing sugar buzz, endorphins, and emotions for the first time, Jonesy’s influence is seeping into the alien: ‘A terrible thought occurred to Mr. Gray: what if it was his concepts that had no meaning?’

King renders the mental fight marvelously, and telepathy is a handy way to make cutting back and forth between the campers’ various alien battlefronts crisp and cinematic. The physical naturalism of the Maine setting is matched by the psychological realism of the interior struggle. Deftly, King incorporates the real-life mental horrors of his own near-fatal accident and dramatizes the way drugs tug at your consciousness. Like the Tommyknockers, the aliens are partly symbols of King’s vanquished cocaine and alcohol addiction. Mainly, though, they’re just plain scary. Dreamcatcher is a comeback and an infusion of rich new blood into King’s body of work. Tim Appelo

From a Buick 8

The state police of Troop D in rural Pennsylvania have kept a secret in Shed B out back of the barracks ever since 1979, when Troopers Ennis Rafferty and Curtis Wilcox answered a call from a gas station just down the road and came back with an abandoned Buick Roadmaster. Curt Wilcox knew old cars, and he knew immediately that this one was wrong, just wrong.

A few hours later, when Rafferty vanished, Wilcox and his fellow troopers knew the car was worse than dangerous and that it would be better if John Q. Public never found out about it. Curt’s avid curiosity taking the lead, they investigated as best they could, as much as they dared. Over the years the troop absorbed the mystery as part of the background to their work, the Buick 8 sitting out there like a still life painting that breathes inhaling a little bit of this world, exhaling a little bit of whatever world it came from. In the fall of 2001, a few months after Curt Wilcox is killed in a gruesome auto accident, his 18-year-old boy Ned starts coming by the barracks, mowing the lawn, washing windows, shoveling snow. Sandy Dearborn, Sergeant Commanding, knows it’s the boy’s way of holding onto his father, and Ned is allowed to become part of the Troop D family. One day he looks in the window of Shed B and discovers the family secret. Like his father, Ned wants answers, and the secret begins to stir, not only in the minds and hearts of the veteran troopers who surround him, but in Shed B as well…

From a Buick 8 is a novel about our fascination with deadly things, about our insistence on answers when there are none, about terror and courage in the face of the unknowable.

The Colorado Kid

On an island off the coast of Maine, a man is found dead. There’s no identification on the body. Only the dogged work of a pair of local newspapermen and a graduate student in forensics turns up any clues.

But that’s just the beginning of the mystery. Because the more they learn about the man and the baffling circumstances of his death, the less they understand. Was it an impossible crime? Or something stranger still…

No one but Stephen King could tell this story about the darkness at the heart of the unknown and our compulsion to investigate the unexplained. With echoes of Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon and the work of Graham Greene, one of the world’s great storytellers presents a surprising tale that explores the nature of mystery itself…

Lisey’s Story

Lisey Debusher Landon lost her husband Scott two years ago, after a twenty five year marriage of the most profound and sometimes frightening intimacy. Scott was an award winning, bestselling novelist and a very complicated man. Early in their relationship, before they married, Lisey had to learn from him about books and blood and bools. Later, she understood that there was a place Scott went a place that both terrified and healed him, could eat him alive or give him the ideas he needed in order to live. Now it’s Lisey’s turn to face Scott’s demons, Lisey’s turn to go to Boo’ya Moon. What begins as a widow’s effort to sort through the papers of her celebrated husband becomes a nearly fatal journey into the darkness he inhabited. Perhaps King’s most personal and powerful story ever, Lisey’s Story is about the wellsprings of creativity, the temptations of madness, and the secret language of love.

Blaze (As: Richard Bachman)

The last of the Richard Bachman novels, recently recovered and published for the first time. Stephen King’s ‘dark half’ may have saved the best for last. A fellow named Richard Bachman wrote Blaze in 1973 on an Olivetti typewriter, then turned the machine over to Stephen King, who used it to write Carrie. Bachman died in 1985 ‘cancer of the pseudonym’, but in late 2006 King found the original typescript of Blaze among his papers at the University of Maine’s Fogler Library ‘How did this get here?!’, and decided that with a little revision it ought to be published.

Blaze is the story of Clayton Blaisdell, Jr. of the crimes committed against him and the crimes he commits, including his last, the kidnapping of a baby heir worth millions. Blaze has been a slow thinker since childhood, when his father threw him down the stairs and then threw him down again. After escaping an abusive institution for boys when he was a teenager, Blaze hooks up with George, a seasoned criminal who thinks he has all the answers. But then George is killed, and Blaze, though haunted by his partner, is on his own. He becomes one of the most sympathetic criminals in all of literature. This is a crime story of surprising strength and sadness, with a suspenseful current sustained by the classic workings of fate and character as taut and riveting as Stephen King’s The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon.

Duma Key

No more than a dark pencil line on a blank page. A horizon line, maybe. But also a slot for blackness to pour through…
A terrible construction site accident takes Edgar Freemantle’s right arm and scrambles his memory and his mind, leaving him with little but rage as he begins the ordeal of rehabilitation.

A marriage that produced two lovely daughters suddenly ends, and Edgar begins to wish he hadn’t survived the injuries that could have killed him. He wants out. His psychologist, Dr. Kamen, suggests a ‘geographic cure,’ a new life distant from the Twin Cities and the building business Edgar grew from scratch. And Kamen suggests something else. ‘Edgar, does anything make you happy?’ ‘I used to sketch.’ ‘Take it up again. You need hedges…
hedges against the night.’ Edgar leaves Minnesota for a rented house on Duma Key, a stunningly beautiful, eerily undeveloped splinter of the Florida coast. The sun setting into the Gulf of Mexico and the tidal rattling of shells on the beach call out to him, and Edgar draws.

A visit from Ilse, the daughter he dotes on, starts his movement out of solitude. He meets a kindred spirit in Wireman, a man reluctant to reveal his own wounds, and then Elizabeth Eastlake, a sick old woman whose roots are tangled deep in Duma Key. Now Edgar paints, sometimes feverishly, his exploding talent both a wonder and a weapon. Many of his paintings have a power that cannot be controlled. When Elizabeth’s past unfolds and the ghosts of her childhood begin to appear, the damage of which they are capable is truly devastating. The tenacity of love, the perils of creativity, the mysteries of memory and the nature of the supernatural Stephen King gives us a novel as fascinating as it is gripping and terrifying.

Under the Dome

Celebrated storyteller Stephen King returns to his roots in this tour de force featuring more than 100 characters some heroic, some diabolical and a supernatural element as baffling and chilling as any he’s ever conjured. On an entirely normal, beautiful fall day in Chester’s Mills, Maine, the town is inexplicably and suddenly sealed off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field. Planes crash into it and fall from the sky in flaming wreckage, a gardener’s hand is severed as ‘the Dome’ comes down on it, people running errands in the neighboring town are divided from their families, and cars explode on impact.

No one can fathom what this barrier is, where it came from, and when or if it will go away. Dale Barbara, Iraq vet and now a short-order cook, finds himself teamed with a few intrepid citizens town newspaper owner Julia Shumway, a physician’s assistant at the hospital, a selectwoman, and three brave kids. Against them stands Big Jim Rennie, a politician who will stop at nothing even murder to hold the reins of power, and his son, who is keeping a horrible secret in a dark pantry. But their main adversary is the Dome itself. Because time isn’t just short. It’s running out. With some of the most spectacularly sinister characters King has ever imagined and a driving plot, Under the Dome is Stephen King at his epic best. This book will thrill every reader who’s ever loved a novel by King.

11/22/63

On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back?

Stephen King’s heart-stoppingly dramatic new novel is about a man who travels back in time to prevent the JFK assassination. Following his massively successful novel Under the Dome, King sweeps listeners back in time to another moment real-life moment when everything went wrong: the JFK assassination. And he introduces listeners to a character who has the power to change the course of history.

Jake Epping is a thirty-five-year-old high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine, who makes extra money teaching adults in the GED program. He receives an essay from one of the students a gruesome, harrowing first-person story about the night fifty years ago when his father came home and killed his mother, his sister, and his brother with a hammer.

Harry escaped with a smashed leg, as evidenced by his crooked walk. Not much later, Jake s friend Al, who runs the local diner, divulges a secret: his storeroom is a portal to 1958. He enlists Jake on an insane and insanely impossible mission to try to prevent the Kennedy assassination. So begins Jake s new life as George Amberson and his new world of Elvis and JFK, of big American cars and sock hops, of a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and a beautiful high school librarian named Sadie Dunhill, who becomes the love of Jack s life a life that transgresses all the normal rules of time. A tribute to a simpler era and a devastating exercise in escalating suspense, 11/22/63 is Stephen King at his epic best.

Night Shift

Night Shift Stephen King’s first collection of stories is an early showcase of the depths that King s wicked imagination could plumb. In these 20 tales, we see mutated rats gone bad Graveyard Shift; a cataclysmic virus that threatens humanity Night Surf, the basis for The Stand; a smoker who will try anything to stop Quitters, Inc.; a reclusive alcoholic who begins a gruesome transformation Gray Matter; and many more. This is Stephen King at his horrifying best.

Different Seasons

Todd Bowden is an apt pupil. Good grades, good family, a paper route. But he is about to meet a different kind of teacher: Mr. Dussander. Todd knows all about Dussander’s darl past. The torture. The death. The decades old manhunt Dussander has escaped to this day. Yet Todd doesn’t want to turn him in. Todd wants to know more. Much more. He is about to learn the real meaning of power and the seductive lure of evil. This acclaimed collection of four novellas by Stephen King also includes ‘Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption’ basis for the Academy Award nominated film The Shawshank Redemption, ‘The Body’ inspiration for the motion picture Stand By Me, and ‘The Breathing Method.’

Skeleton Crew

Among the four unabridged selections from Stephen King’s chilling collection of short horror fiction, Skeleton Crew, is the author’s rendering of ”The Raft.” Book available. /Content /EditorialReview EditorialReview Source Amazon. com Review /Source Content In the introduction to Skeleton Crew 1985, his second collection of stories, King pokes fun at his penchant for ‘literary elephantiasis,’ makes scatological jokes about his muse, confesses how much money he makes gross and net, and tells a story about getting arrested one time when he was ‘suffused with the sort of towering, righteous rage that only drunk undergraduates can feel.’ He winds up with an invitation to a scary voyage: ‘Grab onto my arm now. Hold tight. We are going into a number of dark places, but I think I know the way.’

And he sure does. Skeleton Crew contains a superb short novel ‘The Mist’ that alone is worth the price of admission, plus two forgettable poems and 20 short stories on such themes as an evil toy monkey, a human eating water slick, a machine that avenges murder, and unnatural creatures that inhabit the thick woods near Castle Rock, Maine. The short tales range from simply enjoyable to surprisingly good.

In addition to ‘The Mist,’ the real standout is ‘The Reach,’ a beautifully subtle story about a great grandmother who was born on a small island off the coast of Maine and has lived there her whole life. She has never been across ‘the Reach,’ the body of water between island and mainland. This is the story that King fans give to their friends who don’t read horror in order to show them how literate, how charming a storyteller he can be. Don’t miss it. Fiona Webster

Four Past Midnight

Stephen King leads off with three stories, including ‘Sneakers’, about a very unusual haunting, and ‘Dedication’, one of the most powerful and unsettling of all his works. Dan Simmons pays homage to Philip K Dick with ‘Metastasis’, one of three highly accomplished stories. And George Martin rounds off the book with the brilliant werewolf novella, ‘The Skin Trade’. Dark Visions is a brilliantly original showcase from three masters of the macabre.

Nightmares and Dreamscapes

The third volume in an unabridged audio collection of stories presents a spine-tingling journey into a nightmare world created by a master of sheer terror and macabre imagination. Book available. /Content /EditorialReview EditorialReview Source Amazon. com Review /Source Content Many people who write about horror literature maintain that mood is its most important element. Stephen King disagrees: ‘My deeply held conviction is that story must be paramount…
. All other considerations are a secondary theme, mood, even characterization and language.’

These fine stories, each written in what King calls ‘a burst of faith, happiness, and optimism,’ prove his point. The theme, mood, characters, and language vary, but throughout, a sense of story reigns supreme. Nightmares & Dreamscapes contains 20 short tales including several never before published plus one teleplay, one poem, and one nonfiction piece about kids and baseball that appeared in the New Yorker. The subjects include vampires, zombies, an evil toy, man-eating frogs, the burial of a Cadillac, a disembodied finger, and a wicked stepfather. The style ranges from King’s well-honed horror to a Ray Bradbury like fantasy voice to an ambitious pastiche of Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald. And like a compact disc with a bonus track, the book ends with a charming little tale not listed in the table of contents a parable called ‘The Beggar and the Diamond.’ Fiona Webster

The Man in the Black Suit : 4 Dark Tales

THE MAN IN THE BLACK SUIT FOUR UNABRIDGED DARK TALES FROM STEPHEN KING The Man in the Black Suit Read by John Cullum ‘…
the face of the man in the black suit grows ever clearer, ever closer, and I remember every word he said. I don’t want to think of him, but I can’t help it, and sometimes at night my old heart beats so hard and so fast I think it will tear itself right clear of my chest.

A haunting recollection of a mysterious boyhood event, The Man in Black Suit read by John Cullum leads off this masterful collection from Stephen King. Other dark tales include: All That You Love Will Be Carried Away read by Peter Gerety, in which a man checks into a Lincoln, Nebraska Motel 6 to find the meaning in his life; That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is in French read by Becky Ann Baker presents the ultimate case of d ej a vu; and The Death of Jack Hamilton read by Arliss Howard a blistering tale of Depression era outlaws on the run. Whether writing about encounters with the dead, the near dead, or about the mundane dreads of life, Stephen King’s The Man In The Black Suit: Four Dark Tales is intense, eerie and instantly compelling.

The Green Mile

Set in the 1930s at the Cold Mountain Penitentiary’s death row facility, The Green Mile is the riveting and tragic story of John Coffey, a giant, preternaturally gentle inmate condemned to death for the rape and murder of twin nine-year-old girls. It is a story narrated years later by Paul Edgecomb, the ward superintendent compelled to help every prisoner spend his last days peacefully and every man walks

The Green Mile to execution with his humanity intact. Edgecomb has sent seventy-eight inmates to their date with ‘old sparky,’ but he’s never encountered one like Coffey a man who wants to die, yet has the power to heal. And in this place of ultimate retribution, Edgecomb discovers the terrible truth about Coffey’s gift, a truth that challenges his most cherished beliefs and ours.

Originally published in 1996 in six self-contained monthly installments, The Green Mile is an astonishingly rich and complex novel that delivers over and over again. Each individual volume became a huge success when first published, and all six were on the New York Times bestseller list simultaneously.

Three years later, when Frank Darabont made The Green Mile into an award-winning movie starring Tom Hanks and Michael Clarke Duncan, the book returned to the bestseller list and stayed there for months. And now with a new introduction by King’s foreign agent Ralph Vicinanza, as well as the author’s own foreword we have the first hardcover edition of this magnificent novel in which ‘King surpasses our expectations, leaves us spellbound and hungry for the next twist of plot’ The Boston Globe. With illustrations and a new frontispiece for this edition by Mark Geyer.

Hearts in Atlantis

Stephen King, whose first novel, Carrie, was published in 1974, the year before the last U.S. troops withdrew from Vietnam, is the first hugely popular writer of the TV generation. Images from that war and the protests against it had flooded America’s living rooms for a decade. Hearts in Atlantis, King’s newest fiction, is composed of five interconnected, sequential narratives, set in the years from 1960 to 1999. Each story is deeply rooted in the sixties, and each is haunted by the Vietnam War. In Part One, ‘Low Men in Yellow Coats,’ eleven-year-old Bobby Garfield discovers a world of predatory malice in his own neighborhood. He also discovers that adults are sometimes not rescuers but at the heart of the terror. In the title story, a bunch of college kids get hooked on a card game, discover the possibility of protest…
and confront their own collective heart of darkness, where laughter may be no more than the thinly disguised cry of the beast.

In ‘Blind Willie’ and ‘Why We’re in Vietnam,’ two men who grew up with Bobby in suburban Connecticut try to fill the emptiness of the post-Vietnam era in an America which sometimes seems as hollow and haunted as their own lives. And in ‘Heavenly Shades of Night Are Falling,’ this remarkable audiobook’s denouement. Booby returns to his hometown where one final secret, the hope of redemption, and his heart’s desire may await him. Full of danger, full of suspense, most of all full of heart, Stephen King’s new audiobook will take some listeners to a place they have never been…
and others to a place they have never been able to completely leave.

Blood and Smoke

THREE SHORT STORIES FROM THE MASTER OF MODERN FICTION AVAILABLE ONLY AS AN AUDIOBOOK

Stephen King has forced us to confront our greatest fears. He has guided us through the depths of our imagination to places we never would have ventured alone. Now, in ‘Blood and Smoke, ‘ he takes us inside a world of yearning and paranoia, isolation and addiction. It is the world of the smoker.

In this audio-only collection, the now politically incorrect habit plays a key role in the fates of three different men in three unabridged stories of unfiltered suspense.

In ‘Lunch at the Gotham Cafe, ‘ Steve Davis is suffering through intense withdrawal from both nicotine and his wife. His desperation for a cigarette and for his ex are almost too much to bear, but that’s nothing compared to the horrors that await him at a trendy Manhattan restaurant.

In ‘1408, ‘ Mike Enslin, bestselling author of ‘true’ ghost stories, decides to spend the night in New York City’s most haunted hotel room. But he must live to write about it without the help of his ex-best friends, his trusty smokes.

And in ‘In the Deathroom, ‘ a man named Fletcher is held captive in a South American stronghold. His captors will use any torturous means necessary to extract the information they want from him. His only hope lies with his last request one last cigarette, please. ‘Blood and Smoke‘ is classic Stephen King. The most mesmerizing storyteller of our time is at his inventive and compelling best.

Secret Windows: Essays and Fiction on the Craft of Writing

Exclusive Book Of The Month Club anthology of hard to find non fiction pieces, little known interviews, short stories, and articles about writing for those looking for direction on how to find their own ‘windows’ or for anyone wishing to be touched by Stephen King’s humor and wisdom…

Everything’s Eventual: 14 Dark Tales

The first collection of stories Stephen King has published since Nightmares & Dreamscapes nine years ago, Everything’s Eventual includes one O. Henry Prize winner, two other award winners, four stories published by The New Yorker, and ‘Riding the Bullet,’ King’s original e-book, which attracted over half a million online readers and became the most famous short story of the decade. ‘Riding the Bullet,’ published here on paper for the first time, is the story of Alan Parker, who’s hitchhiking to see his dying mother but takes the wrong ride, farther than he ever intended.

Whether writing about encounters with the dead, the near-dead, or about the mundane dreads of life, from quitting smoking to yard sales, Stephen King is at the top of his form in the fourteen dark tales assembled in Everything’s Eventual. Intense, eerie, and instantly compelling, they announce the stunningly fertile imagination of perhaps the greatest storyteller of our time.

Just After Sunset

Stephen King who has written more than fifty books, dozens of number one New York Times bestsellers, and many unforgettable movies delivers an astonishing collection of short stories, his first since Everything’s Eventual six years ago. As guest editor of the bestselling Best American Short Stories 2007, King spent over a year reading hundreds of stories. His renewed passion for the form is evident on every page of Just After Sunset. The stories in this collection have appeared in The New Yorker, Playboy, McSweeney’s, The Paris Review, Esquire and other publications. Who but Stephen King would turn a Port a San into a slimy birth canal, or a roadside honky tonk into a place for endless love? A book salesman with a grievance might pick up a mute hitchhiker, not knowing the silent man in the passenger seat listens altogether too well. Or an exercise routine on a stationary bicycle, begun to reduce bad cholesterol, might take its rider on a captivating and then terrifying journey. Set on a remote key in Florida, ‘The Gingerbread Girl’ is a riveting tale featuring a young woman as vulnerable and resourceful as Audrey Hepburn’s character in Wait Until Dark. In ‘Ayana,’ a blind girl works a miracle with a kiss and the touch of her hand. For King, the line between the living and the dead is often blurry, and the seams that hold our reality intact might tear apart at any moment. In one of the longer stories here, ‘N.,’ which recently broke new ground when it was adapted as a graphic digital entertainment, a psychiatric patient’s irrational thinking might create an apocalyptic threat in the Maine countryside…
or keep the world from falling victim to it. Just After Sunset call it dusk, call it twilight, it’s a time when human intercourse takes on an unnatural cast, when nothing is quite as it appears, when the imagination begins to reach for shadows as they dissipate to darkness and living daylight can be scared right out of you. It’s the perfect time for Stephen King.

Stephen King Goes to the Movies

Stephen King revisits five of his favorite short stories that have been turned into films: The Shawshank Redemption based on the novella ‘Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption’ was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture and best actor for Morgan Freeman. 1408 starred John Cusack and Samuel L. Jackson and was a huge box office success in 2007. The short story ‘Children of the Corn’ was adapted into the popular Children of the Corn. The Mangler was inspired by King’s loathing for laundry machines from his own experience working in a laundromat. Hearts in Atlantis based on ‘Low Men in Yellow Coats,’ the first part of the novel Hearts in Atlantis starred Anthony Hopkins. This collection features new commentary and introductions to all of these stories in a treasure trove of movie trivia.

Full Dark, No Stars

‘I believe there is another man inside every man, a stranger…
‘ writes Wilfred Leland James in the early pages of the riveting confession that makes up ‘1922’, the first in this pitch-black quartet of mesmerizing tales from Stephen King, linked by the theme of retribution.

For James, that stranger is awakened when his wife Arlette proposes selling off the family homestead and moving to Omaha, setting in motion a gruesome train of murder and madness.

In ‘Big Driver’, a cozy mystery writer named Tess encounters the stranger is along a back road in Massachusetts when she takes a shortcut home after a book club engagement. Violated and left for dead, Tess plots a revenge that will bring her face to face with another stranger: the one inside herself.

‘Fair Extension’, the shortest of these tales, is perhaps the nastiest and certainly the funniest. Making a deal with the devil not only saves Harry Streeter from a fatal cancer but provides rich recompense for a lifetime of resentment. When her husband of more than twenty years is away on one of his business trips, Darcy Anderson looks for batteries in the garage. Her toe knocks up against a box under a worktable and she discovers the stranger inside her husband. It’s a horrifying discovery, rendered with bristling intensity, and it definitively ends ‘A Good Marriage’. Like DIFFERENT SEASONS and FOUR PAST MIDNIGHT, which generated such enduring hit films as The Shawshank Redemption and Stand by Me, Full Dark, No Stars proves Stephen King a master of the long story form.

Road Rage (With: Joe Hill,Richard Matheson)

Road Rage unites Richard Matheson’s classic Duel and the contemporary work it inspired two power packed short stories by three of the genre’s most acclaimed authors. Duel, an unforgettable tale about a driver menaced by a semi truck, was the source for Stephen Spielberg’s acclaimed first film of the same name. Throttle, by Stephen King and Joe Hill, is a duel of a different kind, pitting a faceless trucker against a tribe of motorcycle outlaws, in the simmering Nevada desert. Their battle is fought out on twenty miles of the most lonely road in the country, a place where the only thing worse than not knowing what you’re up against, is slowing down…

Quitters, Inc.

Read by Eric Roberts Dick Morrison’s life has become a nightmare of addictions, filling his days with overeating, overworking, and smoking way too much. When an old friend tells him about a surefire way to quit, he’s more than willing to give it a shot. But what Dick doesn’t know is that Quitters, Inc. demands a high price from anyone who strays from their rigid rules? like a few volts of electricity for the nearest and dearest…
or maybe a missing thumb? Forced to choose between his desperate need for cigarettes and the dire consequences of giving in to his addiction, Dick must decide just how important another drag really is.

The Mist

Sound so visual you’re literally engulfed by its bone chilling terror! Stephen King’s sinister imagination and the miracle of 3 D sound transport you to a sleepy all American town. It’s a hot, lazy day, perfect for a cookout, until you see those strange dark clouds. Suddenly a violent storm sweeps across the lake and ends as abruptly and unexpectedly as it had begun. Then comes The Mist
creeping slowly, inexorably into town, where it settles and waits, trapping you in the supermarket with dozens of others, cut off from your families and the world. The Mist is alive, seething with unearthly sounds and movements.

What unleashed this terror? Was it the Arrowhead Project the top secret government operation that everyone has noticed but no one quite understands? And what happens when the provisions have run out and you’re forced to make your escape, edging blindly through the dim light? The Mist has you in it grip, and this masterpiece of 3 D sound engineering surrounds you with horror so real that you’ll be grabbing your own arm for reassurance. To one side and whipping around your chair, a slither of tentacles. Swooping down upon you, a rush of grotesque, prehistoric wings. In the impenetrable mist, hearing is seeing and believing. And what you’re about to hear, you’ll never forget.

The Body

In 1960s America, four young boys go on a journey to search for The Body of a boy killed by a train. As they travel, they discover how cruel the world can be, but also how wondrous. ‘Penguin Readers’ is a series of simplified novels, film novelizations and original titles that introduce students at all levels to the pleasures of reading in English.

The Shawshank Redemption

10th Anniversary reissue of cult gaolhouse classic to coincide with a re-release on 9 September Nominated for 7 Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Screenplay, The Shawshank Redemption, starring Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman, is an extraordinary tale of hope and survival inside a maximum-security prison.

Based on a Stephen King short story, Frank Darabont’s screenplay follows the complex 20-year relationship between two convicts who have little in common beyond a will to survive. Darabont personally wrote and assembled all of the extensive material, in this, the best selling of the Shooting Script series: Introductions by Stephen King and Frank Darabont The Shooting Script in its original form Detailed analysis of the script to screen changes 29 pages in all showing how and why scenes were cut and amended Two storyboard sequences, with commentary Stills section of 35 photos in all Afterword by Darabont about his experience in Hollywood

Apt Pupil

Todd Bowden is an Apt Pupil. Good grades, good family, a paper route. But he is about to meet a different kind of teacher: Mr. Dussander. Todd knows all about Dussander’s darl past. The torture. The death. The decades old manhunt Dussander has escaped to this day. Yet Todd doesn’t want to turn him in. Todd wants to know more. Much more. He is about to learn the real meaning of power and the seductive lure of evil.

This acclaimed collection of four novellas by Stephen King also includes ‘Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption‘ basis for the Academy Award nominated film The Shawshank Redemption, ‘The Body’ inspiration for the motion picture Stand By Me, and ‘The Breathing Method.’

Cycle of the Werewolf

When the full moon shines, a paralyzing fear descends on the isolated Maine town of Tarker Mills. No one knows who will be attacked next, but snarls that sound like human words can be heard and all around are the footprints of a monster whose hunger cannot be sated.

The Breathing Method

From the world’s bestselling novelist comes the third tale in the Different Seasons collection. In this masterful horror story, thirteen men gather in their gentlemen’s club to hear the story of ‘The Breathing Method.’ And they will be forever transfigured by this terrifying story of a woman who was determined to give birth at all costs. The Breathing Method is one of four novellas in a collection that includes The Shawshank Redemption and Apt Pupil.

The Langoliers

The first of a four part audio series from Stephen King’s best selling book, Four Past Midnight. On a redeye flight from Los Angeles to Boston, only 11 passengers survive but landing in a dead world makes them wish they hadn’t.

The Library Policeman

This is the third gripping tale in the four part audio series from Stephen King’s best selling book Four Past Midnight. Set in Junction City, Iowa, The Library Policeman is the story of Sam Peebles, a middle-aged businessman who happens to have some overdue books. It seems a minor offense but not to Junction City s malevolent monster of a librarian. What follows is spine-tingling suspense as only Stephen King can deliver it.

Secret Window, Secret Garden

Past midnight, something happens to time, that fragile concept we use to order our sense of reality. It bends, stretches, turns back, or snaps, and sometimes reality snaps with it. And what happens to the wide eyed observer when the window between reality and unreality shatters? This chilling story, part two of Stephen King’s bestselling Four Past Midnight, provides some shocking answers…
. Secret Window, Secret Garden draws the listener into the suddenly strange life of writer Mort Rainey, recently divorced, depressed, and alone on the shores of Tashmore Lake. Alone, that is, until a figure named John Shooter arrives, pointing an accusing finger.

Umney’s Last Case

This ‘Penguin 60s’ book contains a short story taken from ‘Nightmares And Dreamscapes’.

Riding the Bullet

A Stephen King ghost story in the grand tradition, Riding the Bullet is the ultimate warning about the dangers of hitchhiking. A college student’s mother is dying in a Maine hospital. When he hitches a ride to see her, the driver is not who he appears to be. Soon the journey veers off into a dark landscape that could only be drawn by Stephen King.

LT’s Theory of Pets

A Rare Live Stephen King Recording! Stephen King delivers a haunting, heartfelt performance as he shares a story about the bonds between husbands, wives and pets. LT has a theory about pets, particularly his Siamese cat. It had been their cat not just his cat, but that was until he came home one day to a note on the fridge. His wife had left him. The cat stayed behind…
Recorded live at London’s Royal Festival Hall, LT’s Theory of Pets demonstrates yet again that Stephen King is a master storyteller.

Stationary Bike

New on audio from Stephen King…
an unabridged novella’s artful as anything he has ever written.’ Booklist Climb aboard Stationary Bike a streamlined fever dream of a tale, in which an ordinary household object assumes otherworldly powers and a familiar journey takes a terrifying twist.

When commercial artist Richard Sifkitz finally gets around to having that physical he’d been putting off for years, and his cholesterol comes back dangerously high, he does what so many thirty-something, junk food eating couch potatoes have done before him: he buys a Stationary Bike, and vows to ride it regularly. Unlike many a mid-life exercise convert, however, Richard actually starts to ride his new Stationary Bike. A lot. Soon he’s spending so much time on his bike that he decides to put his artistic talents to use and paint a mural on the wall opposite his Stationary Bike. But it turns out that Richard’s mural is no ordinary picture and soon his Stationary Bike is taking him places he doesn’t want to go…
and can’t stay away from. A riveting riff on artistic frustration, midlife mortality, and hard-won redemption, Stationary Bike is a thrill ride that could come only from the mind of Stephen King.

The Gingerbread Girl

In the emotional aftermath of her baby’s sudden death, Em starts running. Soon she runs from her husband, to the airport, down to the Florida Gulf, and out to the loneliest stretch of Vermillion Key, where her father has offered the use of a conch shack he has kept there for years. Em keeps up her running barefoot on the beach, sneakers on the road and sees virtually no one. This is doing her all kinds of good, until one day she makes the mistake of looking into the driveway of a man named Pickering. Pickering also enjoys the privacy of Vermillion Key, but the young women he brings there suffer the consequences. Will Em be next?

UR

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. Among his most recent are the Dark Tower novels, Cell, From a Buick 8, Everything’s Eventual, Hearts in Atlantis, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, Lisey’s Story and Bag of Bones. His acclaimed nonfiction book, On Writing, was also a bestseller. He was the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Maine with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

Blockade Billy

From New York Times bestselling author Stephen King comes the haunting story of Blockade Billy, the greatest Major League baseball player to be erased from the game. Even the most die hard baseball fans don’t know the true story of William Blockade Billy Blakely. He may have been the greatest player the game has ever seen, but today no one remembers his name. He was the first and only player to have his existence completely removed from the record books. Even his team is long forgotten, barely a footnote in the game’s history. Every effort was made to erase any evidence that William Blakely played professional baseball, and with good reason. Blockade Billy had a secret darker than any pill or injection that might cause a scandal in sports today. His secret was much, much worse…
and only Stephen King, the most gifted storyteller of our age, can reveal the truth to the world, once and for all.

Mile 81

Mile 81 is Stand by Me meets Christine the story of an insatiable car and a heroic kid. At Mile 81 on the Maine turnpike is a boarded-up rest stop, a place where high school kids drink and get into the kind of trouble high school kids have always gotten into. It’s the place where Pete Simmons goes when his older brother, who s supposed to be looking out for him, heads off to the gravel pit to play paratroopers over the side. Pete, armed only with the magnifying glass he got for his tenth birthday, finds a discarded bottle of vodka in the boarded up burger shack and drinks enough to pass out.

Not much later, a mud-covered station wagon which is strange because there hadn’t been any rain in New England for over a week veers into the Mile 81 rest area, ignoring the sign that says closed, no services. The driver s door opens but nobody gets out. Doug Clayton, an insurance man from Bangor, is driving his Prius to a conference in Portland. On the backseat are his briefcase and suitcase and in the passenger, bucket is a King James Bible, what Doug calls the ultimate insurance manual, but it isn’t going to save Doug when he decides to be the Good Samaritan and help the guy in the broken down wagon.

He pulls up behind it, puts on his four ways, and then notices that the wagon has no plates. Ten minutes later, Julianne Vernon, pulling a horse trailer, spots the Prius and the wagon, and pulls over. Julianne finds Doug Clayton s cracked cell phone near the wagon door and gets too close herself. By the time Pete Simmons wakes up from his vodka nap, there are half a dozen cars at the Mile 81 rest stop. Two kids Rachel and Blake Lussier and one horse named Deedee are the only living left. Unless you maybe count the wagon.

Creepshow

Five scary tales are written in comic book format.

The Talisman: Road of Trials (With: Peter Straub)

The spellbinding saga of The Talisman is now a stunning graphic novel, vividly illustrated by artist Tony Shasteen. Here’s a bold new look at the classic tale of treachery and betrayal that could only have sprung from the imaginations of master storytellers Stephen King and Peter Straub.

In a run-down amusement park on a desolate beach in New Hampshire, thirteen-year-old Jack Sawyer is about to learn some hard truths about his father s death, about why he and his mother are on the run from his sinister uncle Morgan, and about the real nature of the mysterious realm, Jack once called the Daydreams.

Now, with help from his newfound friend Speedy Parker, this young man will reclaim his identity as Travellin Jack and make his first foray back into the Territories to retrieve the magical Talisman, an object of immense cosmic significance. Yet even more important to Jack, the Talisman holds the key to saving his mother s life. In the Terrorities, where monsters lurk, evil watches and an unbelievably precious prize awaits, Jack embarks upon a desperate quest to fulfill a destiny he never sought but cannot escape. The Talisman: The Road of Trials comprises Issues 0 through 5 of the thrilling comic book series and features original, never before seen material, including interviews and early sketches. Be warned: Once you’ve seen the Talisman, nothing will ever be the same.

From the author of dozens of 1 New York Times bestsellers and the creator of many unforgettable movies comes a vivid, intelligent, and nostalgic journey through three decades of horror as experienced through the eyes of the most popular writer in the genre. In 1981, years before he was down to tackle On Writing, Stephen King decided to address the topic of what makes horror horrifying and what makes terror terrifying.

Here, in ten brilliant chapters, King delivers one colorful observation after another about the great stories, books and films that comprise the horror genre from Frankenstein and Dracula to The Exorcist, The Twilight Zone, and Earth vs. The Flying Saucers. With insight and good humor his fans appreciated in On Writing, Danse Macabre is an enjoyable entertaining tour through Stephen King’s beloved world of horror.

Nightmares in the Sky: Gargoyles and Grotesques

This book will be a collection of fantastic and horrifying photographs of gargoyles taken by avant-garde photographer f stop Fitzgerald yes, that’s his name and the spelling is correct, with a wonderful text by none other than the master of horror, Stephen King. F stop has captured gargoyles in all manner of poses, made all the more striking by the design by mark pollard. Through the use of gatefolds and full-bleed illustrations, these awesome creatures will seem practical to leap off the page.

On Writing

‘If you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time or the tools to write.’ In 1999, Stephen King began to write about his craft and his life. By midyear, a widely reported accident jeopardized the survival of both. And in his months of recovery, the link between writing and living became more crucial than ever. Rarely has a book On Writing been so clear, so useful, and so revealing.

On Writing begins with a mesmerizing account of King’s childhood and his uncannily early focus On Writing to tell a story. A series of vivid memories from adolescence, college, and the struggling years that led up to his first novel, Carrie, will afford readers a fresh and often very funny perspective on the formation of a writer. King next turns to the basic tools of his trade how to sharpen and multiply them through use, and how the writer must always have them close at hand.

He takes the reader through crucial aspects of the writer’s art and life, offering practical and inspiring advice on everything from plot and character development to work habits and rejection. Serialized in the New Yorker to vivid acclaim, On Writing culminates with a profoundly moving account of how King’s overwhelming need to write spurred him toward recovery, and brought him back to his life. Brilliantly structured, friendly and inspiring, On Writing will empower and entertain everyone who reads it.

Faithful

A fan’s notes for the ages, Faithful grew from an email exchange last summer. Filled with the heady mix of exhilaration and frustration familiar to all Boston Red Sox fans, Stewart O’Nan fired off a note to fellow Sox fan, Stephen King, who responded with his thoughts on Pedro, Nomar, Manny, Mueller, and Theo. From the supposed Curse of the Bambino to f in’ Bucky Dent to the recent off season battle for Alex Rodriguez, Sox fans have seen it all since 1918…
except for that elusive World Championship.

Baseball history has transformed these fans into a ‘nation’ not to mention the most dedicated, knowledgeable fanbase on the planet. Stewart O’Nan and Stephen King, proud members of Red Sox Nation, will chronicle the 2004 baseball season from spring training to the last game of the season the important plays, the controversial managerial decisions, the significant front office moves, and the spectacular finish whether heartbreaking or joyous. Attending games together, keeping a running diary of observations and arguments, and occasionally evoking great or tragic events in Red Sox history. King and O’Nan will cheer on their beloved team with the eternal hope that this just might be the year. If you don’t have season ticket box seats right behind the firstbase dugout, you can’t beat Faithful.

Transgressions (By:Ed McBain)

New York Times bestsellers Ed McBain, Walter Mosely, and Donald Westlake each provided a brand new, never before published tale for this unique collection of stories edited by bestselling author and mystery legend Ed McBain.’Merely Hate’ by Ed McBain: When a string of Muslim cabdrivers are killed, and the evidence points to another ethnic group, the detectives of the 87th Precinct must hunt down a killer before the city explodes in violence.’Archibald Lawless, Anarchist at Large: Walking the Line’ by Walter Mosley: Felix Orlean is a New York City journalism student who needs a job to cover his rent. An ad in the paper leads him to Archibald Lawless, and a descent into a shadow world where no one and nothing is as it first seems.

‘Walking Around Money’ by Donald E. Westlake: The master of the comic mystery is back with an all new novella featuring hapless crook John Dortmunder, who gets involved in a crime that supposedly no one will ever know happened. Naturally, when something it too good to be true, it usually is, and Dortmunder is going to get to the bottom of this caper before he’s left holding the bag.

Transgressions, Vol. 2 (With: Lawrence Block,Ed McBain,John Farris)

New York Times bestsellers and thriller legends John Farris and Stephen King each provided a brand new, never before published tale for this unique collection of stories edited by New York Times bestselling author and mystery legend Ed McBain. The Ransome Women by John Farris: A psychological thriller that questions the role beauty plays in society and the cult of celebrity.

A young and beautiful, starving artist catches a break when her idol, the reclusive portraitist John Ransome offers her a lucrative modeling contract. But how long will her excitement last when she discovers the fate shared by all Ransome’s past subjects? The Things They Left Behind by Stephen King: A hauntingly moving tale of survival guilt in New York City after 9/11. Scott Staley called in sick for his job at the World Trade Center that Tuesday morning. Now in the aftermath of 9/11, he must face his guilty conscience as he begins to find the things his deceased coworkers left behind.

Storm of the Century: An Original Screenplay

For the first time in Stephen King’s remarkable publishing history, the master storyteller presents an all-new, original tale written expressly for the television screen. They’re calling it the Storm of the Century, and it’s coming hard. The residents of Little Tall Island have seen their share of nasty Maine Nor’easters, but this one is different. Not only is it packing hurricane-force winds and up to five feet of snow, but it’s also bringing something worse.

Something even the islanders have never seen before. Something no one wants to see. Just as the first flakes begin to fall, Martha Clarendon, one of Little Tall Island’s oldest residents, suffers an unspeakably violent death. While her blood dries, Andre Linoge, the man responsible sits calmly in Martha’s easy chair holding his cane topped with a silver wolf’s head…

waiting. Linoge knows the townsfolk will come to arrest him. He will let them. For he has come to the island for one reason. And when he meets Constable Mike Anderson, his beautiful wife and child, and the rest of Little Tall’s tight-knit community, this stranger will make one simple proposition to them all: ‘If you give me what I want, I’ll go away.’

The Best American Short Stories 1981

Short Stories by Ann Beattie, John Updike, Cynthia Ozick, Louis D. Rubin, Mavis Gallant, Alice Munro, Elizabeth Tallent, Hortense Calisher, Joyce Carol Oates, Elizabeth Hardwick, and many others.

The Best American Short Stories 1983

Short Stories by Ann Tyler, Bill Barich, John Updike, Carolyn Chute, Ursula K. Le Guin, Raymond Carver, and many others.

The Best American Short Stories 1986

Short Stories by Ann Beattie, Ethan Canin, Joy Williams, Richard Ford, Tobias Wolff, Alice Munro, Thomas McGuane, Lord Tweedsmuir, Donald Barthelme, Raymond Carver, and many others.

The Best American Short Stories of the Eighties

The 1980s were one of the most fertile and controversial times for the American short story. Rich in craft and variety, this collection includes such classic and beloved stories as Peter Taylor’s ‘The Old Forest,’ Raymond Carver’s ‘Cathedral,’ and other works by Joyce Carol Oates, Russell Banks, and a host of exciting, newer talents.

The Best American Short Stories 1993

The preeminent annual collection of short fiction features the writing of John Updike, Alice Munro, Wendell Berry, Diane Johnson, Lorrie Moore, Stephen Dixon, and Mary Gaitskill.

The Best American Short Stories 1994

That’s because a good short story crosses the borders of our nations and our prejudices and our beliefs.

The Best American Short Stories 1995

These twenty short stories boldly and insightfully explore the extremes of human emotions. In her story ‘Night Talkers,’ Edwidge Danticat reunites a young man and the elderly aunt who raised him in Haiti. Anthony Doerr brings readers a naturalist who discovers the surprising healing powers of a deadly cone snail.

Louise Erdrich writes of an Ojibwa fiddler whose music brings him deep and mysterious joy. Here are diverse and intriguing characters a kidnapper, an immigrant nanny, an amputee blues musician who are as surprised as the reader is at what brings them happiness.

In his introduction, Walter Mosley explores the definition of a good short story, and writes, ‘The writers represented in this collection have told stories that suggest much larger ideas. I found myself presented with the challenge of simple human love contrasted against structures as large as religion and death. The desire to be loved or to be seen, represented on a canvas so broad that it would take years to explain all the roots that bring us to the resolution.’

Each of these stories bravely evokes worlds brimming with desire and loss, humanity and possibility. Since its inception in 1915, the Best American series has become the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction. For each volume, a series editor reads pieces from hundreds of periodicals, then selects between fifty and a hundred outstanding works. That selection is pared down to twenty or so very best pieces by a guest editor who is widely recognized as a leading writer in his or her field. This unique system has helped make the Best American series the most respected and most popular of its kind. Lending a fresh perspective to a perennial favorite, Walter Mosley has chosen unforgettable short stories by both renowned writers and exciting newcomers.

The Best American Short Stories 1996

Each fall, The Best American Short Stories provides a fresh showcase for this rich and unpredictable genre. Selected from an unusually wide variety of publications, the choices for 1996 place stories from esteemed national magazines alongside those from some of the smallest and most innovative literary journals. Contributors include Joyce Carol Oates, Mary Gordon, Robert Olen Butler, Alice Adams, Lynn Sharon Schwartz, and an array of stunning new talent.

The Best American Short Stories 1997

The preeminent short fiction series since 1915, The Best American Short Stories is the only annual that offers the finest works chosen by a distinguished best selling guest editor. This year, E. Annie Proulx’s selection includes dazzling stories by Tobias Wolff, Donald Hall, Cynthia Ozick, Robert Stone, Junot D’az, and T. C. Boyle as well as an array of stunning new talent. In her introduction, Proulx writes that beyond their strength and vigor, these stories achieve ‘a certain intangible feel for the depth of human experience, not uncommonly expressed through a kind of dry humor.’ As ever, this year’s volume surprises and rewards.

The Best American Short Stories 1998

Edited by beloved storyteller Garrison Keillor, this year’s volume promises to be full of humor, surprises, and, as always, accomplished writing by new and familiar voices. The preeminent short fiction series since 1915, The Best American Short Stories is the only volume that annually offers the finest works chosen by a distinguished best selling author.

The Best American Short Stories 1999

‘What I look for most in a story,’ writes Amy Tan in her introduction to this year’s volume of The Best American Short Stories, ‘what I crave, what I found in these twenty one, is a distinctive voice that tells a story only that voice can tell.’ Tan found herself drawn to wonderfully original stories that satisfied her appetite for the magic and mystery she loved as a child, when she was addicted to fairy tales.

In this vibrant collection, fantasy and truth coexist brilliantly in new works by writers such as Annie Proulx, Lorrie Moore, Nathan Englander, and Pam Houston. ‘The Sun, the Moon, the Stars,’ by Junot Diaz, features a young man trying to stave off heartbreak in a sacred cave in Santo Domingo. In ‘Mrs. Dutta Writes a Letter,’ by Chitra Divakaruni, a mother moves from India to California to be closer to her son, only to sacrifice something crucial along the way. In Melissa Hardy’s haunting story ‘The Uncharted Heart,’ a geologist unearths a shocking secret in the wilds of northern Ontario. ‘Maybe I’m still that kid who wants to see things I’ve never seen before,’ writes Tan. ‘I like being startled by images I never could have conjured up myself.’ With twenty one tales, each a fabulously rich journey into a different world, The Best American Short Stories 1999 is sure to surprise and delight.

The Best American Short Stories 2000

Still the only anthology shaped each year by a different guest editor always a preeminent master of the form THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES is the essential yearbook of the American literary scene. Here are the most talked-about short stories of the year alongside undiscovered gems.

In his introduction, guest editor E. L. Doctorow writes, ‘Here is the felt life conferred by the gifted storyteller…
who always raises two voices into the lonely universe, the character’s and the writer’s own.’ Doctorow has chosen a compelling variety of voices to usher in the new millennium, attesting to the astonishing range of human experience our best writers evoke.

When a great annual collection comes out, it’s hard to know the reason why. Was there a bumper crop of high quality stories, or was this year’s guest editor especially gifted at winnowing out the good ones? Either way, the 2000 edition of The Best American Short Stories is a standout in a series that can be uneven. Its editor, E.L. Doctorow, seems to have a fondness for the ‘what if?’ story, the kind of tale that posits an imagination prodding question and then attempts to answer it.

Nathan Englander’s ‘The Gilgul of Park Avenue’ asks: What if a WASPy financial analyst, riding in a cab one day, discovers to his surprise that he is irrevocably Jewish? In ‘The Ordinary Son,’ Ron Carlson asks: What if you are the only average person in a family of certifiable geniuses? And Allan Gurganus’s ‘He’s at the Office’ asks: What if the quintessential postwar American working man were forced to retire? This last story is narrated by the man’s grown son, who at the story’s opening takes his dad for a walk. Though it’s the present day, the father is still dressed in his full 1950s businessman regalia, including camel hair overcoat, and felt hat. The two walk by a teenager. ‘The boy smiled. ‘Way bad look on you, guy.”

My father, seeking interpretation, stared at me. I simply shook my head no. I could not explain Dad to himself in terms of tidal fashion trends. All I said was ‘I think he likes you.’

The exchange typifies the writing showcased in this anthology: in these stories, again and again, we find a breakdown of human communication that is sprightly, humorous, and devastatingly complete. A few more of the terrific stories featured herein: Amy Bloom’s ‘The Story,’ a goofy metafiction about a villainous divorcee; Geoffrey Becker’s ‘Black Elvis,’ which tells of, well, a black Elvis; and Jhumpa Lahiri’s ‘The Third and Final Continent,’ a story of an Indian man who moves to Cambridge, Massachusetts. Like the collection itself, Lahiri’s story amasses a lovely, funny mood as it goes along. Claire Dederer

The Best American Short Stories of the Century

Since the series’ inception in 1915, the annual volumes of The Best American Short Stories have launched literary careers, showcased the most compelling stories of each year, and confirmed for all time the significance of the short story in our national literature. Now The Best American Short Stories of the Century brings together the best of the best fifty-five extraordinary stories that represent a century’s worth of unsurpassed accomplishments in this quintessentially American literary genre.

Here are the stories that have endured the test of time: masterworks by such writers as Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Saroyan, Flannery O’Connor, John Cheever, Eudora Welty, Philip Roth, Joyce Carol Oates, Raymond Carver, Cynthia Ozick, and scores of others. These are the writers who have shaped and defined the landscape of the American short story, who have unflinchingly explored all aspects of the human condition, and whose works will continue to speak to us as we enter the next century. Their artistry is represented splendidly on these pages.

THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES series has also always been known for making literary discoveries, and discovery proved to be an essential part of selecting the stories for this volume too. Collections from years past yielded a rich harvest of surprises, stories that may have been forgotten but still retain their relevance and luster. The result is a volume that not only gathers some of the most significant stories of our century between two covers but resurrects a handful of lost literary gems as well. Of all the great writers whose work has appeared in the series, only John Updike’s contributions have spanned five consecutive decades, from his first appearance, in 1959, to his most recent, in 1998. Updike worked with coeditor Katrina Kenison to choose stories from each decade that meet his own high standards of literary quality.

The Best American Short Stories 2001

Since its inception in 1915, the Best American series has become the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction. For each volume, a series editor reads pieces from hundreds of periodicals, then selects between fifty and a hundred and twenty outstanding works. That selection is pared down to the twenty or so very best pieces by a guest editor who is widely recognized as a leading writer in his or her field. This unique system has helped make the Best American series the most respected and most popular of its kind.

A wonderfully diverse collection, this year’s BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES from Hollywood to Hong Kong, from the Jersey shore to Wales, considering the biggest issues: love, war, health, success. Edited by the critically acclaimed, best-selling author Barbara Kingsolver, The Best American Short Stories 2001 includes selections by Rick Bass, Ha Jin, Alice Munro, John Updike, and others. Highlighting exciting new voices as well as established masters of the form, this year’s collection is a testament to the good health of contemporary short fiction in this country.

The Best American Short Stories 2002

Since its inception in 1915, the Best American series has become the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction. For each volume, a series editor reads pieces from hundreds of periodicals, then selects between fifty and a hundred outstanding works. That selection is pared down to the twenty or so very best pieces by a guest editor who is widely recognized as a leading writer in his or her field. This unique system has helped make the Best American series the most respected and most popular of its kind.

This year’s Best American Short Stories features a rich mix of voices, from both intriguing new writers and established masters of the form like Michael Chabon, Edwidge Danticat, Richard Ford, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Arthur Miller. The 2002 collection includes stories about everything from illicit love affairs to family, the immigrant experience, and badly behaved children’s stories varied in the subject but unified in their power and humanity.

In the words of this year’s guest editor, the best-selling author Sue Miller, ‘The American short story today is healthy and strong…
These stories arrived in the nick of time…
to teach me once more what we read fiction for.’

The Best American Short Stories 2003

Since its inception in 1915, the Best American series has become the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction. For each volume, a series editor reads pieces from hundreds of periodicals, then selects between fifty and a hundred outstanding works. That selection is pared down to twenty or so very best pieces by a guest editor who is widely recognized as a leading writer in his or her field.

This unique system has helped make the Best American series the most respected and most popular of its kind. Lending a fresh perspective to a perennial favorite, Walter Mosley has chosen unforgettable short stories by both renowned writers and exciting newcomers. The Best American Short Stories 2003 features poignant tales that explore the nuances of family life and love, birth and death. Here are stories that will, as Mosley writes in his introduction, ‘live with the reader long after the words have been translated into ideas and dreams. That’s because a good short story crosses the borders of our nations and our prejudices and our beliefs.’Dorothy Allison Edwidge Danticat E. L. Doctorow Louise Erdrich Adam Haslett ZZ Packer Mona Simpson Mary Yukari Waters

The Best American Short Stories 2004

Each year it offers the opportunity to dive into the current trends and fresh voices that define the modern American short story’ Chicago Tribune. This year’s most beloved short fiction anthology is edited by the best-selling novelist Sue Miller, author of While I Was Gone, and, most recently, The World Below.

The volume includes stories by Edwidge Danticat, Jill McCorkle, E. L. Doctorow, Arthur Miller, and Akhil Sharma, among others. /Content /EditorialReview EditorialReview Source Amazon. com Review /Source Content In her opening remarks to The Best American Short Stories 2002, guest editor Sue Miller notes the difficulty of reading fiction produced during 2001, the year of the September 11 terrorist attacks.

She also remarks that by the time she had finalized her 20 selections, this act of reading had restored her faith both in fiction’s significance and its ability to tap into timeless themes. The 2002 anthology includes stories best described as realist fiction or traditional fiction, many set in contemporary times.

The tales range from E.L. Doctorow’s ‘A House on the Plains,’ a murder set at the turn of the century, to pieces with more recent settings, like ‘Puppy’ by Richard Ford, which shows how a New Orleans couple deals or doesn’t deal with the appearance of a stray dog. Both Jhumpa Lahiri’s ‘Nobody’s Business’ and Edwidge Danticat’s ‘Seven’ deftly portray the disconnection a semi assimilated Indian American and Haitian American couple experiences both as partners and as U.S. citizens. Leonard Michael’s ‘Nachman from Los Angeles,’ in contrast, adds some levity to the mix. Miller adds in her preface that maybe next year the tales will depart further from tradition, but judging from this volume no departure is necessary: the selections take the reader on a delightful journey through some of America’s best contemporary writers. Jane Hodges

The Best American Short Stories 2005

The Best American Series First, Best, and Best Selling

The Best American series has been the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction since 1915. Each volume’s series editor selects notable works from hundreds of periodicals. A special guest editor, a leading writer in the field, then chooses the very best twenty or so pieces to publish. This unique system has made the Best American series the most respected and most popular of its kind.

The Best American Short Stories 2005 includes

Dennis Lehane Tom Perrotta Alice Munro Edward P. Jones Joy Williams Joyce Carol Oates Thomas McGuane Kelly Link Charles D’Ambrosio Cory Doctorow George Saunders and others

Michael Chabon, the guest editor, is the best-selling author of The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, A Model World, and, most recently, The Final Solution. His novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay won the Pulitzer Prize in 2000.

The Best American Short Stories 2006

While a single short story may have a difficult time raising enough noise on its own to be heard over the din of civilization, short stories in bulk can have the effect of swarming bees, blocking out sound and sun and becoming the only thing you can think about, writes Ann Patchett in her introduction to The Best American Short Stories 2006.

This vibrant, varied sampler of the American literary scene revels in life’s little absurdities, captures timely personal and cultural challenges and ultimately shares subtle insight and compassion. In The View from Castle Rock, the short story master Alice Munro imagines a fictional account of her Scottish ancestors’ emigration to Canada in 1818. Nathan Englander s cast of young characters in How We Avenged the Blums confronts a bully dubbed The Anti Semite to both comic and tragic ends. In Refresh, Refresh, Benjamin Percy gives a forceful, heart-wrenching look at a young man’s choices when his father along with most of the men in his small town is deployed to Iraq. Yiyun Li s After a Life reveals secrets, hidden shame, and cultural change in modern China. And in Tatooizm, Kevin Moffett weaves a story full of humor and humanity about a young couple s relationship that has run its course.

Ann Patchett brought unprecedented enthusiasm and judiciousness to The Best American Short Stories 2006 , writes Katrina Kenison in her foreword, and she is, surely, every story writer s ideal reader, eager to love, slow to a fault, exquisitely attentive to the text and all that lies beneath it.

The Best American Short Stories 2007

In his introduction to this volume, Stephen King writes, Talent does more than come out; it bursts out, again and again, doing exuberant cartwheels while the band plays ‘Stars and Stripes Forever’…

Talent can t help itself; it roars along in fair weather or foul, not sparing the fireworks. It gets emotional. It struts its stuff. In fact, that’s its job. Wonderfully eclectic, The Best American Short Stories 2007 collects stories by writers of undeniable talent, both newcomers and favorites. These stories examine the turning points in life when we, like children or parents, lovers or friends or colleagues, must break certain rules in order to remain true to ourselves.

In T. C. Boyle s heartbreaking Balto, a thirteen year old girl provides devastating courtroom testimony in her father s trial. Aryn Kyle s charming story Allegiance shows a young girl caught between her despairing British mother and motherly American father. In The Bris, Eileen Pollack brilliantly writes of a son struggling to fulfill his filial obligations, even when they require a breach of morality and religion. Kate Walbert s stunning Do Something portrays one mother s impassioned and revolutionary refusal to accept her son s death. And in Richard Russo s graceful Horseman, an English professor comes to understand that plagiarism reveals more about a student than original work can. New series editor Heidi Pitlor writes, Stephen King s dedication, unflagging hard work, and enthusiasm for excellent writing shone through on nearly a daily basis this past year…

We agreed, disagreed, and in the end very much concurred on the merit of the twenty stories chosen. The result is a vibrant assortment of stories and voices brimming with attitude, deep wisdom, and rare compassion.

The Best Short Stories of 1921, and the Yearbook of the American Short Story

Edward Joseph Harrington O’Brien 1890 1941 was an American author, poet, editor, and anthologist. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and attended Boston College and Harvard University. He was noted for compiling and editing an annual collection of The Best Short Stories by American authors at the beginning of the twentieth century, and also a series of The Best Short Stories by British authors. They proved to be highly influential and popular. He was also a noted author, his works including White Fountains 1917 and The Forgotten Threshold 1918.

The Best American Short Stories 2008

This brilliant collection, edited by the award-winning and perennially provocative Salman Rushdie, boasts a magnificent array of Library Journal of voices both new and recognized. With Rushdie at the helm, the 2008 edition reflects the variety of substance and style and the consistent quality that readers have come to expect from Publishers Weekly.

We all live in and with and by stories, every day, whoever and wherever we are. The freedom to tell each other the stories of ourselves, to retell the stories of our culture and beliefs, is profoundly connected to the larger subject of freedom itself. Salman Rushdie, editor The Best American Short Stories 2008 includes KEVIN BROCKMEIER ALLEGRA GOODMAN A. M. HOMES NICOLE KRAUSS JONATHAN LETHEM STEVEN MILLHAUSER DANIYAL MUEENUDDIN ALICE MUNRO GEORGE SAUNDERS TOBIAS WOLFF and others

The Best American Short Stories 2009

Edited by critically acclaimed, best-selling author Alice Sebold, the stories in this year’s collection serve as a provacative literary ‘antenna for what is going on in the world’ Chicago Tribune. The collection boasts great variety from ‘famous to first timers, sifted from major magazines and little reviews, grand and little worlds’ St. Louis Post Dispatch, ensuring yet another rewarding, eduring edition of the oldest and best selling Best American.

The Best American Short Stories 2010

Edited by the award-winning, best-selling author Richard Russo, this year’s collection boasts a satisfying chorus of twenty stories that are by turns playful, ironic, somber, and meditative Wall Street Journal. With the masterful Russo picking the best of the best, America s oldest and best-selling story anthology is sure to be of enduring quality Chicago Tribune this year.

The Best American Short Stories 2011

With a New AfterwordAs a prizewinning foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, Geraldine Brooks spent six years covering the Middle East through wars, insurrections, and the volcanic upheaval of resurgent fundamentalism. Yet for her, headline events were only the backdrop to a less obvious but more enduring drama: the daily life of Muslim women.

Nine Parts of Desire is the story of Brooks’ intrepid journey toward an understanding of the women behind the veils, and of the often contradictory political, religious, and cultural forces that shape their lives. Defying our stereotypes about the Muslim world, Brooks’ acute analysis of the world’s fastest growing religion deftly illustrates how Islam’s holiest texts have been misused to justify repression of women, and how male pride and power have warped the original message of a once liberating faith.

The Best Horror of the Year: Volume One

An Air Force Loadmaster is menaced by strange sounds within his cargo; a man is asked to track down a childhood friend…who died years earlier; doomed pioneers forge a path westward as a young mother discovers her true nature; an alcoholic strikes a dangerous bargain with a gregarious stranger; urban explorers delve into a ruined book depository, finding more than they anticipated; residents of a rural Wisconsin town defend against a legendary monster; a woman wracked by survivor’s guilt is haunted by the ghosts of a tragic crash; a detective strives to solve the mystery of a dismembered girl; an orphan returns to a wicked witch’s candy house; a group of smugglers find themselves buried to the necks in sand; an unanticipated guest brings doom to a high class party; a teacher attempts to lead his students to safety as the world comes to an end around them…

What frightens us, what unnerves us? What causes that delicious shiver of fear to travel the lengths of our spines? It seems the answer changes every year. Every year the bar is raised; the screw is tightened.

Ellen Datlow knows what scares us; the twenty one stories and poems included in this anthology were chosen from magazines, webzines, anthologies, literary journals, and single author collections to represent the best horror of the year. Legendary editor Ellen Datlow Poe: New Tales Inspired by Edgar Allan Poe, winner of multiple Hugo, Bram Stoker, and World Fantasy awards, joins Night Shade Books in presenting The Best Horror of the Year, Volume One.

The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Two

Legendary editor Ellen Datlow, winner of multiple Hugo, Bram Stoker, and World Fantasy awards, joins Night Shade Books in presenting The Best Horror of the Year Volume 2.

The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Three

What frightens us? What unnerves us? What causes that delicious shiver of fear to travel the lengths of our spines? It seems the answer changes every year. Every year the bar is raised; the screw, tightened. Ellen Datlow knows what scares us; the nineteen stories included in this anthology were chosen from magazines, webzines, anthologies, literary journals, and single-author collections to represent the best horror of the year.

Last Night at the Lobster (By:Stewart O’Nan)

Stewart O Nan has been called the bard of the working class and has now crafted a frank and funny yet emotionally resonant tale set within a vivid workaday world seldom seen in contemporary fiction. Perched in the far corner of a run-down New England mall, The Red Lobster hasn’t been making its numbers and headquarters has pulled the plug. But manager Manny DeLeon still needs to navigate a tricky last shift.

With only four shopping days left until Christmas, Manny must convince his near mutinous staff to hunker down and serve the final onslaught of hungry retirees, lunatics, and holiday office parties. All the while, he’s wondering how to handle the waitress he s still in love with, his pregnant girlfriend at home, and the perfect present he still needs to buy. Last Night at the Lobster is a poignant yet redemptive look at what a man does when he discovers that his best might not be good enough.

Dark Forces: New Stories of Suspense and Supernatural Horror

This is the ultimate feast of fear by a host of horror writers such as Robert Bloch, Ray Bradbury, Ramsey Campbell, and others. Twenty four macabre tales include the nerve-twisting novelette The Mist by Stephen King. Previously published in mass market by Bantam.

Dark Love

Twenty two tales of erotic obsession include works by Stephen King, Ramsey Campbell, Stuart Kaminsky, George C. Chesbro, John Peyton Cooke, Ed Gorman, Lucy Taylor, Nancy A. Collins, and others. PW. AB. K.

The Dark Descent

In The Dark Descent, hailed as one of the most important anthologies ever to examine horror fiction, editor David G. Hartwell traces the complex history of horror in literature back to the earliest short stories. The Dark Descent, which won the World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology, showcases the finest of these ever written from the time-honored classics of Edgar Allan Poe, D.H. Lawrence, and Edith Wharton to the contemporary writing of Stephen King, Clive Barker, and Ray Bradbury.

Prime Evil

This stunning collection of novellas and short stories by masters of the macabre brings to fans and newcomers an unrelenting spell of horror and suspense. These are tales that strike beyond sheer terror, as their disturbing visions capture the dark reality we all fear. Features work by Stephen King, Clive Barker, Peter Straub, and more. ‘Gets the adrenaline flowing’. Washington Post.

Dark Visions

A collection of horror stories from Stephen King, Dan Simmons, and George R.R. Martin. Dan Simmons’ first book, ‘The Song Of Kali’, won the 1987 World Fantasy Award, while Stephen King has written ‘Carrie’, ‘Pet Sematary’ and ‘The Shining’. George Martin is the author of ‘Fevre Dream’.

THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF SHORT HORROR NOVELS

In this exciting anthology spanning more than a century, Stephen King leads a roster of ten great novelists of horror, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Algernon Blackwood, Lucius Shepard, Russell Kirk, A.C. Benson, T.E.D. Klein, John Metcalf, Oliver Onions, and David Case.

Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos

‘The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.’ H. P. LOVECRAFT, ‘Supernatural Horror in Literature’ Howard Phillips Lovecraft forever changed the face of horror, fantasy, and science fiction with a remarkable series of stories as influential as the works of Poe, Tolkien, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.

His chilling mythology established a gateway between the known universe and an ancient dimension of otherworldly terror, whose unspeakable denizens and monstrous landscapes dread Cthulhu, Yog Sothoth, the Plateau of Leng, the Mountains of Madness have earned him a permanent place in the history of the macabre. In Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos, a pantheon of horror and fantasy’s finest authors pay tribute to the master of the macabre with a collection of original stories set in the fearsome Lovecraft tradition: The Call of Cthulhu by H. P. Lovecraft: The slumbering monster gods return to the world of mortals. Notebook Found in a Deserted House by Robert Bloch: A lone farmboy chronicles his last stand against a hungering backwoods evil. Cold Print by Ramsey Campbell: An avid reader of forbidden books finds a treasure trove of deadly volumes available for a bloodcurdling price. The Freshman by Philip Jos Farmer: A student of the black arts receives an education in horror at notorious Miskatonic University. PLUS EIGHTEEN MORE SPINE TINGLING TALES!

The Horror Hall of Fame

18 great tales, classics of the genre. Includes: The Fall of the House of Usher, by Edgar Allan Poe; Green Tea, by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu; The Damned Thing, by Ambrose Bierce; The Yellow Sign, by Robert W. Chambers; The Monkey’s Paw, by W. W. Jacobs; The White People, by Arthur Machen; The Willows, by Algernon Blackwood; Casting the Runes, by M. R. James; The Graveyard Rats, by Henry Kuttner; Pigeons from Hell, by Robert E. Howard; It, by Theodore Sturgeon; Smoke Ghost, by Fritz Leiber; Yours Truly Jack the Ripper, by Robert Bloch; The Small Assassin, by Ray Bradbury; The Whimper of Whipped Dogs, by Harlan Ellison; Calling Card, by Ramsey Campbell; Coin of the Realm nominated, 1982 World Fantasy Award, by Charles L. Grant; The Reach Do the Dead Sing? winner, 1982 World Fantasy Award, by Stephen King.

Midnight Graffiti

A collection of new horror stories includes contributions by Stephen King, Harlan Ellison, Dan Simmons, David J. Schow, Nancy Collins, and others.

Mid-life Confidential: The Rock Bottom Remainders Tour America with Three Chords and an Attitude

Part gossip, part behind the scenes tell-all, part confessional, this book details the strangest tour in rock history, as 15 of America’s most popular writers including Stephen King, Amy Tan, Dave Barry, and Barbara Kingsolver left their ‘day jobs’ for life on the rock ‘n’ roll road. Features 100 candid and often excruciatingly embarrassing photos, 30 in color.

The Vampire Omnibus

This is a collection of early vampire tales, together with the short stories on which many horror films of the genre were based. The book looks at the development of the tales of the ‘undead’ over the past 200 years.

Horror Stories

Perfect for Halloween a chilling, thrilling collection of two dozen terrifically horrifying stories from a range of authors including Edgar Allan Poe, Guy de Maupassant, Stephen King, Vivien Alcock, and John Steinbeck.

The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror: Ninth Annual Collection

This renowned series, recipient of three World Fantasy Awards, continues to captivate and fascinate readers. Stories by such notables as Scott Bradfield, A.S. Byatt, Pat Cadigan, Peter Crowther, Charles De Lint, Ellen Kushner, Tanith Lee, Ursula K. Le Guin, Patricia A. McKillip, Nina Kiriki Hoffman, Douglas E. Winter, and thirty-three other acclaimed writers show off the very best of contemporary fantasy and horror, while comprehensive and exhaustive summations add critical depth to this unique anthology. This book is essential for all fans of the weird and wonderful.

Twists of the Tale: An Anthology of Cat Horror

In ancient Egypt, they were worshiped. In the Middle Ages, they were crucified. From a gentle purr to a sudden scratch, enter the dark, secret world of the creature who is definitely not man’s best friend and who likes it just fine that way. In this extraordinary collection, 24 master storytellers look into the inscrutable eyes of Felis catus and see a reflection of the frightening, the fantastic, and the bizarre. From birds’ feet left at your door to a howl in the night, from a preen to a pounce, find out who they really are…
if you dare.

American Gothic Tales

A collection of more than forty tales of horror and suspense begins with such nineteenth-century writers as Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne and includes the works of Flannery O’Connor, Stephen King, Anne Rice, William Faulkner, E. B. White, and others.

Blood Thirst

In the past hundred years, since the publication of Bram Stoker’s infamous book, no literary figure has enjoyed a more horrific resiliency than Count Dracula. In film, television, novels, and short stories, he keeps coming back to life, fed by the vital imaginative energies of a world wide audience that cannot seem to resist his abominable charms. Aristocratic and urbane, deeply erotic and profoundly evil, Dracula’s bloodsucking savagery has cast a mesmerizing fascination not only over his victims but over his readers as well.

The blood exchange the taking of blood by the vampire from his or her victim is, all by itself, felt to be a singularly symbolic event. Symbolic and attractive!’ Now, in Blood Thirst: One Hundred Years of Vampire Fiction, Leonard Wolf brings together thirty tales in which vampires of all varieties make their ghastly presence felt male and female, human and non-human, humorous and heroic all of them kin to the dreadful bat.

From Lafcadio Hearn, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Edith Wharton, August Derleth, and Ray Bradbury to such contemporary masters as Anne Rice, Stephen King, Joyce Carol Oates, John Cheever, and Woody Allen, and in settings as diverse as rural New England and outer space, this collection offers readers a dazzling compendium of vampire stories.

Wolf organizes the collection into six categories The Classic Adventure Tale, The Psychic Vampire, The Science Fiction Vampire, The Non-Human Vampire, The Comic Vampire, and The Heroic Vampire which allows readers to see the many guises Dracula’s descendants have assumed and the many ways they can be interpreted.

In his penetrating introduction, Wolf argues that such an arrangement enables us to see the evolution of the vampire from an unmitigated evil to a creature we are more likely to identify with. ‘In a century in which God and Satan have become increasingly irrelevant in the popular arts, there has been an accompanying secularization of the vampire idea. And, as the stories in Blood Thirst will show, sympathy for the vampire has grown as we have become increasingly interested in the workings of the mind.’

Indeed, the vampire’s ability to change over time, to draw into itself such a richness of symbolic meanings, to conjure itself into so many diabolical shapes, may account for the enduring appeal of the literature written about it. Here, then, is a definitive collection for aficionados and novices alike, and whether readers find the vampires who inhabit these pages sympathetic or horrific, psychologically intriguing or spiritually repellent, morbidly seductive or comically absurd, Blood Thirst gives us all something to sink our teeth into.

Robert Bloch’s Psychos

Featuring a never before published short story from Stephen King and edited by the world-renowned and award-winning author of ‘Psycho’, Robert Bloch, this collection includes 22 masterworks harvested by the Horror Writers Association. Stephen King toe tags a stiff who’s still very much alive, and going under the knife, in ‘Autopsy Room Four’. Richard Christian Matheson clocks the final minutes of a man at the mercy of monsters in ‘Please Help Me’. Charles Grant shadows a lost soul looking for a place to rest in ‘Haunted’.

The Best of the Best

To commemorate its 50th anniversary, Signet is proud to present The Best of the Best one-of-a-kind collection of all-original stories by some of the biggest names in publishing! From gripping tales of suspense to powerful stories of human triumph, this special hardcover focuses on the broad range of genres and authors that continues to define the Signet name!

Eternal Lovecraft: The Persistence of HPL in Popular Culture

Fantasist H. P. Lovecraft enjoys an honor shared by few other authors of imaginative fiction since his death, the term Lovecraftian has come into worldwide use to describe a body of work so fully realized as to influence countless generations of subsequent writers.

Each author in this volume came under the Lovecraftian conjuration and then wrote a story that in some way reflects this experience, providing compelling testimony that H. P. Lovecraft is one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. These stories have been previously published but are now gathered together to create this excellent but diverse anthology.

999: New Stories of Horror and Suspense

The weaving of fictional suspense and terror is as ancient as humankind itself. But where does this age-old tradition stand at the cusp of a new decade, a new century, a new millennium? This mammoth volume seeks to answer that question. You hold in your hands the state of the art of fear. To prepare this groundbreaking anthology, writer and editor Al Sarrantonio challenged a distinguished roster of authors to demonstrate with all-new stories the shape of horror/suspense literature as we enter the twenty-first century.

As you will read the twenty-nine contributors responded by displaying the infinite variety which is the very hallmark of this field. Some of these stories will startle you or fill you with terror. Some will haunt you long after you finish reading them. There is even an eerily echoing chuckle or two found inside. But together, these weirdest of tales join to form a great literary mosaic, a vivid contemporary portrait of a genre that is proud, potent, and irresistible. Not only is this the largest anthology of original horror/suspense fiction of all time not one story in 999 has ever been published before but it is also the finest. Here is a major publishing event with an attitude: to shake you up and scare you silly.

Over 250,000 words of the finest fantasy and horror. For more than a decade, readers have looked to The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror to showcase the highest achievements of fantastic fiction.

The fiction and poetry here are culled from an exhaustive survey of the field, nearly four dozen stories ranging from fairy tales to gothic horror, from magical realism to dark tales in the Grand Guignol style. Rounding out the volume are the editors’ invaluable overviews of the year in fantastic fiction, and a long list of Honorable Mentions, making this volume a valuable reference source as well as the best reading available in fantasy and horror.

The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century

In The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century, best selling author Tony Hillerman and mystery expert Otto Penzler present an unparalleled treasury of American suspense fiction that every fan will cherish. Offering the finest examples from all reaches of the genre, this collection charts the mystery’s eminent history from the turn of the century puzzles of Futrelle, to the seminal pulp fiction of Hammett and Chandler, to the mystery story’s rise to legitimacy in the popular mind, a trend that has benefited masterly writers like Westlake, Hunter, and Grafton.

Nowhere else can readers find a more thorough, more engaging, more essential distillation of American crime fiction. Penzler, BEST AMERICAN MYSTERY STORIES series editor, and Hillerman, whose Leaphorn/Chee novels have won him multiple Edgar Awards and millions of devotees, winnowed this select group out of a thousand stories, drawing on sources as diverse as ELLERY QUEEN’S MYSTERY MAGAZINE and ESQUIRE, COLLIER’S and THE NEW YORKER.

Mystery buffs and newcomers alike will delight in the thrilling stories and top-notch writing of a hundred years’ worth of the finest suspense, crime, and mystery writing.

A Century of Great Suspense Stories

New York Times bestselling author Jeffery Deaver’s enviable task? Choose the best mystery/horror detective stories from a century of work by the world’s most celebrated writers.

In the Shadow of the Master

Few have crafted stories as haunting as those by Edgar Allan Poe. Collected here to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Poe’s birth are sixteen of his best tales accompanied by twenty essays from beloved authors, including T. Jefferson Parker, Lawrence Block, Sara Paretsky, and Joseph Wambaugh, among others, on how Poe has changed their life and work. Michael Connelly recounts the inspiration he drew from Poe’s poetry while researching one of his books.

Stephen King reflects on Poe’s insight into humanity’s dark side in ‘The Genius of ‘The Tell Tale Heart.” Jan Burke recalls her childhood terror during late-night reading sessions. Tess Gerritsen, Nelson DeMille, and others remember the classic B movie adaptations of Poe’s tales. And in ‘The Thief,’ Laurie R. King complains about how Poe stole all the good ideas… or maybe he just thought of them first.

Powerful and timeless, In the Shadow of the Master is a celebration of one of the greatest literary minds of all time. The Mystery Writers of America, founded in 1945, is the foremost organization for mystery writers and other professionals dedicated to the field of crime writing.

The Future Dictionary of America

This book was conceived by Safran Foer Foer, Nicole Krauss, and Dave Eggers as a way to bring over a hundred authors together to promote progressive causes in the November 2004 election.

The book is an imagining of what a dictionary might look like about thirty years hence, when all of the world’s problems are solved and our current president is a distant memory. The book is by turns funny, outraged, utopian, and dyspeptic.

Over 150 writers contributed to the book, including: Stephen King, Robert Olen Butler, Glen David Gold, Richard Powers, Susan Straight, Sarah Vowell, Billy Collins, C.K. Williams, Colson Whitehead, Donald Antrim, Jonathan Franzen, Edwidge Danticat, Edward Hirsch, Joyce Carol Oates, Katha Pollitt, Padgett Powell, Paul Auster, Anthony Swofford, Julia Alvarez, Susan Choi, Jim Shepard, Aimee Bender, and Art Spiegelman. Hardcover editions of the book will also include a CD compilation, with all new songs by the best musicians working. Among them: David Byrne, R.E.M., Death Cab for Cutie, Moby, Sleater Kinney, Flaming Lips, Tom Waits, Yo La Tengo, Bright Eyes, They Might Be Giants, Elliott Smith, and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

Transgressions

Forge Books is proud to present an amazing collection of novellas, compiled by New York Times bestselling author Ed McBain. Transgressions is a quintessential classic of never before published tales from today’s very best novelists. Featuring: ‘Walking Around Money’ by Donald E. Westlake: The master of the comic mystery is back with an all-new novella featuring hapless crook John Dortmunder, who gets involved in a crime that supposedly no one will ever know happened.

Naturally, when something is too good to be true, it usually is, and Dortmunder is going to get to the bottom of this caper before he’s left holding the bag.

‘Hostages’ by Anne Perry: The bestselling historical mystery author has written a tale of beautiful yet still savage Ireland today. In their eternal struggle for freedom, there is about to be a changing of the guard in the Irish Republican Army. Yet for some, old habits and honor still die hard, even at gunpoint.

‘The Corn Maiden’ by Joyce Carol Oates: When a fourteen-year-old girl is abducted in a small New York town, the crime starts a spiral of destruction and despair as only this master of psychological suspense could write it.

‘Archibald Lawless, Anarchist at Large: Walking the Line’ by Walter Mosley: Felix Orlean is a New York City journalism student who needs a job to cover his rent. An ad in the paper leads him to Archibald Lawless, and a descent into a shadow world where no one and nothing is as it first seems.

‘The Resurrection Man’ by Sharyn McCrumb’: During America’s first century, doctors used any means necessary to advance their craft including dissecting corpses. Sharyn McCrumb brings the South of the 1850s to life in this story of a man who is assigned to dig up bodies to help those that are still alive.

‘Merely Hate’ by Ed McBain: When a string of Muslim cabdrivers are killed, and the evidence points to another ethnic group, the detectives of the 87th Precinct must hunt down a killer before the city explodes in violence.

‘The Things They Left Behind’ by Stephen King: In the wake of the worst disaster on American soil, one man is coming to terms with the aftermath of the Twin Towers when he begins finding the things they left behind.’The Ransome Women’ by John Farris: A young and beautiful starving artist is looking to catch a break when her idol, the reclusive portraitist John Ransome offers her a lucrative year-long modeling contract. But how long will her excitement last when she discovers the fate shared by all Ransome’s past subjects?

‘Forever’ by Jeffery Deaver: Talbot Simms is an unusual cop he’s a statistician with the Westbrook County Sheriff Department. When two wealthy couples in the county commit suicide one right after the other, he thinks that it isn’t suicide, it’s murder, and he’s going to find how who was behind it, and how they did it.

‘Keller’s Adjustment’ by Lawrence Block: Everyone’s favorite hitman is back in MWA Grand Master Lawrence Block’s novella, where the philosophical Keller deals out philosophy and murder on a meandering road trip from one end of the America to the other.

Dancing with the Dark

Fiction pales beside fact in this anthology of such phenomena as spectral visions, phantom footsteps, and astral projections related by the masterful Stephen King, Ramsey Campbell, Clive Barker, Anne McCaffrey, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Bloch, H. P. Lovecraft, Neil Gaiman, and many others.

Related Authors

 

 

Leave a Comment