Philip K. Dick Books In Order

Blade Runner Books In Publication Order

  1. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? / Blade Runner (1968)
  2. The Edge of Human (By:K.W. Jeter) (1995)
  3. Replicant Night (By:K.W. Jeter) (1996)
  4. Eye and Talon (By:K.W. Jeter) (2000)

VALIS Trilogy Books In Publication Order

  1. VALIS (1981)
  2. The Divine Invasion (1981)
  3. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer (1982)

Standalone Novels In Publication Order

  1. Solar Lottery / World of Chance (1955)
  2. The World Jones Made (1956)
  3. The Man Who Japed (1956)
  4. Eye in the Sky (1957)
  5. The Cosmic Puppets (1957)
  6. Time Out of Joint (1959)
  7. Dr. Futurity (1960)
  8. Vulcan’s Hammer (1960)
  9. The Man in the High Castle (1962)
  10. The Game-Players of Titan (1963)
  11. The Penultimate Truth (1964)
  12. The Simulacra (1964)
  13. The Unteleported Man (1964)
  14. Clans of the Alphane Moon (1964)
  15. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (1964)
  16. Martian Time-Slip (1964)
  17. Dr. Bloodmoney, or How We Got Along After the Bomb (1965)
  18. Now Wait for Last Year (1966)
  19. The Crack in Space (1966)
  20. Counter-Clock World (1967)
  21. The Ganymede Takeover (With: ) (1967)
  22. The Zap Gun (1967)
  23. Galactic Pot-Healer (1969)
  24. We Can Build You (1969)
  25. Ubik (1969)
  26. A Maze of Death (1970)
  27. Our Friends From Frolix 8 (1970)
  28. Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said (1974)
  29. Deus Irae (With: Roger Zelazny) (1976)
  30. A Scanner Darkly (1977)
  31. Lies, Inc. (1983)
  32. In Milton Lumky Territory (1984)
  33. The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike (1984)
  34. Radio Free Albemuth (1985)
  35. Puttering About in a Small Land (1985)
  36. Humpty Dumpty in Oakland (1986)
  37. Mary and the Giant (1987)
  38. Nick and the Glimmung (1988)
  39. The Broken Bubble (1988)
  40. Voices from the Street (2007)

Short Stories/Novellas In Publication Order

  1. Beyond Lies the Wub (1951)
  2. The Gun (1952)
  3. The Skull (1952)
  4. The Defenders (1953)
  5. War Veteran (1955)
  6. The Minority Report (1956)
  7. The Unreconstructed M (1957)
  8. Cantata-140 (1964)

Short Story Collections In Publication Order

  1. The Defenders and Three Others (1950)
  2. Beyond the Door (1954)
  3. The Crystal Crypt (1954)
  4. Small Town (1954)
  5. The Last of the Masters (1954)
  6. A Handful of Darkness (1955)
  7. Human Is? (1955)
  8. The Variable Man and Other Stories (1957)
  9. The Book of Philip K. Dick (1972)
  10. The Golden Man (1980)
  11. I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon (1985)
  12. We Can Remember It for You Wholesale (1987)
  13. Second Variety (1987)
  14. The Dark-Haired Girl (1988)

Graphic Novels In Publication Order

  1. A Scanner Darkly (1977)

Non-Fiction Books In Publication Order

  1. Confessions of a Crap Artist (1975)
  2. What If Our World is Their Heaven? (1982)
  3. In Pursuit of VALIS (1991)
  4. The Shifting Realities of Philip K. Dick (1995)

Star Science Fiction Books In Publication Order

  1. Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2 (By:Frederik Pohl) (1953)

Anthologies In Publication Order

  1. Star Science Fiction Stories 3 (1955)
  2. Galaxy Science Fiction, December 1963 (1963)
  3. Dangerous Visions 2 (1967)
  4. Dangerous Visions (1967)
  5. Final Stage: The Ultimate Science Fiction Anthology (1974)
  6. Beyond Tomorrow (1976)
  7. The Best from Fantasy and Science Fiction 24 (1982)
  8. The Third Omni Book of Science Fiction (1985)
  9. Battlefields Beyond Tomorrow (1987)
  10. Hunger for Horror (1988)
  11. Spells of Enchantment: The Wondrous Fairy Tales of Western Culture (1991)
  12. Visions of Fear (1992)
  13. Inside the Funhouse (1992)
  14. Angels! (1995)
  15. New Skies: An Anthology of Today’s Science Fiction (2003)
  16. The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction (2010)
  17. The Ultimate Short Story Bundle (2020)

Blade Runner Book Covers

VALIS Trilogy Book Covers

Standalone Novels Book Covers

Short Stories/Novellas Book Covers

Short Story Collections Book Covers

Graphic Novels Book Covers

Non-Fiction Book Covers

Star Science Fiction Book Covers

Anthologies Book Covers

Philip K. Dick Books Overview

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? / Blade Runner

‘The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world.’ John BrunnerTHE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER…
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn’t afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep…
They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn’t want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.’ Dick sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities…
that other authors shy away from.’ Paul Williams Rolling Stone

The Edge of Human (By:K.W. Jeter)

K.W. Jeter picks up the tale of Rick Deckard, the blade runner’ created by Phillip K. Dick and popularized by Ridley Scott’s cult classic film. Consistent with the sordid vision of 21st century Los Angeles crafted by Dick and Scott, Jeter creates a stylish piece of thrilling, futuristic suspense that finds Deckard not only in the role of hunter, but also hunted. Again, Deckard is on the trail of an replicant, not knowing that it may be the most elusive and dangerous android of all. From the Paperback edition.

Replicant Night (By:K.W. Jeter)

The Blade Runner adventure continues in this dark and stylish novel of nonstop futuristic suspense as ex blade runner Rick Deckard must cross the most dangerous line of all the line between human and android. Rick Deckard had left his career as a blade runner and the gritty, neon lit labyrinth of L.A. behind, going to the emigrant colony of Mars to live incognito with Sarah Tyrell. But when a movie about Deckard’s life begins shooting, old demons start to surface. The most bizarre and mysterious is a talking briefcase the voice belonging to Deckard’s most feared adversary. The briefcase tells Deckard that he’s the key to a replicant revolution back on Earth. Deckard must deliver the briefcase the secret contents to the replicants of the outer colonies before he is tracked down and killed. Is the briefcase lying? Who is really after Deckard? And who is the little girl who claims her name is Rachael? Once again Deckard is on the run from a sinister force determined to destroy him and already closing in. From the Paperback edition.

Eye and Talon (By:K.W. Jeter)

Fully authorised by the estate of Philip K. Dick and written by the author they felt best equipped to take forward the vision of one of the great names in SF, ‘Blade Runner 4: Beyond Orion’ combines the dark imagery, paranoia, tension, and pace of Dick’s original novel and the cinematic genius of Ridley Scott in a novel that takes the ‘Blade Runner’ series into a new millennium. ‘Blade Runner’ has become one of the most recognisable and well loved brands in SF and K.W. Jeter has only added to its reputation and impact.

VALIS

VALIS is the first book in Philip K. Dick’s incomparable final trio of novels the others being are The Divine Invasion and The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. This disorienting and bleakly funny work is about a schizophrenic hero named Horselover Fat; the hidden mysteries of Gnostic Christianity; and reality as revealed through a pink laser. VALIS is a theological detective story, in which God is both a missing person and the perpetrator of the ultimate crime.’The fact that what Dick is entertaining us about is reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation this has escaped most critics. Nobody notices that we have our own homegrown Borges, and have had him for thirty years.’ Ursula K. Le Guin, New Republic

The Divine Invasion

Exiled for 2,000 years God must retake the Earth from the clutches of his nemesis using a man caught between life and death as His vessel. God is in exile. The only man who can help is clinically dead. Herb Asher, an audio engineer by trade, is in suspended animation following a car accident that appears to have taken his life. As he floats in cryonic suspension he awaits his new spleen and dreams back through the last six years of his life which reveal much of his bizarre journey and the battle with Belial, the force of evil that will stop at nothing to achieve its goal.

The Transmigration of Timothy Archer

The final book in Philip K. Dick’s VALIS trilogy, The Transmigration of Timothy Archer brings the author s search for the identity and nature of God to a close. The novel follows Bishop Timothy Archer as he travels to Israel, ostensibly to examine ancient scrolls bearing the words of Christ. But more importantly, this leads him to examine the decisions he made during his life and how they may have contributed to the suicides of his mistress and son. This introspective book is one of Dick s most philosophical and literary, delving into the mysteries of religion and of faith itself. As one of Dick s final works, it also provides unique insight into the mind of a genius, whose work was still in the process of maturing at the time of his death.

Solar Lottery / World of Chance

The year is 2203, and the ruler of the Universe is chosen according to the random laws of a strange game under the control of Quizmaster Verrick. But when Ted Bentley, a research technician recently dismissed from his job, signs on to work for Verrick, he has no idea that Leon Cartwright is about to become the new Quizmaster. Nor does he know that he’s about to play an integral part in the plot to assassinate Cartwright so that Verrick can resume leadership of a universe not nearly as random as it appears. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utilizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

The World Jones Made

Floyd Jones is sullen, ungainly and quite possibly mad, but he really can see exactly one year into the future. And this talent means that in a very short time he rises from being a disgruntled carnival fortune teller to convulse an entire planet. For Jones becomes a demagogue, whipping up the ideal starved population into a frenzy against the threat of the ‘drifters’ , enormous single cell protoplasms that may be landing on Earth soon. But, in a world of engineered mutants, hermaphrodite sex performers in drug fuelled nightclubs, Jones is a tragic messiah. His limited precognition renders him helpless because he cannot bring himself to fight against what he knows will happen…

The Man Who Japed

The Man Who Japed is Dick’s mesmerizing and terrifying tale of a society so eager for order that it will sacrifice anything, including its freedom. Newer York is a post holocaust city governed by the laws of an oppressively rigid morality. Highly mobile and miniature robots monitor the behavior of every citizen, and the slightest transgression can spell personal doom. Allen Purcell is one of the few people who has the capacity to literally change the way of the world, and once he’s offered a high profile job that acts as guardian of public ethics, he sets out to do precisely that. But first he must deal with the head in his closet.

Eye in the Sky

While sightseeing at the Belmont Bevatron, Jack Hamilton, along with seven others, is caught in a lab accident. When he regains consciousness, he is in a fantasy world of Old Testament morality gone awry a place of instant plagues, immediate damnations, and death to all perceived infidels. Hamilton figures out how he and his compatriots can escape this world and return to their own, but first they must pass through three other vividly fantastical worlds, each more perilous and hilarious than the one before. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utilizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

The Cosmic Puppets

Yielding to a compulsion he can t explain, Ted Barton interrupts his vacation in order to visit the town of his birth, Millgate, Virginia. But upon entering the sleepy, isolated little hamlet, Ted is distraught to find that the place bears no resemblance to the one he left behind and never did. He also discovers that in this Millgate Ted Barton died of scarlet fever when he was nine years old. Perhaps even more troubling is the fact that it is literally impossible to escape. Unable to leave, Ted struggles to find the reason for such disturbing incongruities, but before long, he finds himself in the midst of a struggle between good and evil that stretches far beyond the confines of the valley. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utilizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

Time Out of Joint

Ragle Gumm has a very unique job: every day he wins a newspaper contest. And when he isn t consulting his charts and tables, he enjoys his life in a small town in 1959. At least, that’s what he thinks. But then strange things start happening: he finds a phone book where all the numbers have been disconnected, and a magazine article about a famous starlet he s never heard of named Marilyn Monroe. Plus, everyday objects are beginning to disappear and are replaced by strips of paper with words written on them like ‘bowl of flowers’ and ‘soft drink stand.’ When Ragle skips town to try to find the cause of these bizarre occurrences, his discovery could make him question everything he has ever known.

Dr. Futurity

Jim Parsons is a talented doctor, skilled at the most advanced medical techniques and dedicated to saving lives. But after a bizarre road accident leaves him hundreds of years in the future, Parsons is horrified to discover an incredibly advanced civilization that zealously embraces death. Now, he is caught between his own instincts and training as a healer and a society where it is illegal to save lives. But Parsons is not the only one left who believes in prolonging life, and those who share his beliefs have desperate plans for Dr. Parsons’ skills, and for the future of their society. Dr. Futurity is not only a thrilling rendition of a terrifying future but it is also a fantastic examination of the paradoxes of time travel that could only have come from the mind of Philip K. Dick. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utlizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

Vulcan’s Hammer

Objective, unbiased and hyperrational, the Vulcan 3 should have been the perfect ruler. The omnipotent computer dictates policy that is in the best interests of all citizens or at least, that is the idea. But when the machine, whose rule evolved out of chaos and war, begins to lose control of the Healer movement of religious fanatics and the mysterious force behing their rebellion, all Hell breaks loose. Written in 1960, Philip K. Dick’s paranoid novel imagines a totalitarian state in which hammer headed robots terrorize citizens and freedom is an absurd joke. William Barrios, the morally conflicted hero, may be the only person who can prevent the battle for control from destroying the world if, that is, he can decide which side he s on. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utilizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

The Man in the High Castle

It’s America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. the few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some 20 years earlier the United States lost a war and is now occupied jointly by Nazi Germany and Japan. This harrowing, Hugo Award winning novel is the work that established Philip K. Dick as an innovator in science fiction while breaking the barrier between science fiction and the serious novel of ideas. In it Dick offers a haunting vision of history as a nightmare from which it may just be possible to awake. About the Author Philip K Dick was born in Chicago in 1928, but lived most of his life in California. He began reading science fiction when he was 12 and was never able to stop. Among the most prolific and eccentric of’s f writers, Dick’s many novels and stories allbelend a sharp and quirky imagination with a strong sense of the surreal. The Man in the High Castle won the Hugo Award in 1963. Other novels include: The Penultimate Truth, Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch and Time Out of Joint. He died in 1982. This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The Game-Players of Titan

Philip K Dick’s classic dystopian novel set in the future where the remaining human survivors on Earth must gamble for their future with aliens from Titan, one of the moons circling Saturn. Roaming the pristine landscape of Earth, cared for by machines and aliens, the few remaining humans alive since the war with Titan play Bluff, allowing them to win or lose property and also form new marriages in order to maximise the remote chance some pairings will produce a child. When Pete Garden, a particularly suicidal member of the Pretty Blue Fox game playing group, loses his current wife and his deed to Berkeley, he stumbles upon a far bigger, more sinister version of the game. The telepathic, slug like Vugs of Titan are the players and at stake is the Earth itself. The Game Players of Titan is a brilliantly conceived vision of a future dystopia, full of imaginative detail, moments of pure humour and thought provoking musings on the nature of perception, as the seemingly straightforward narrative soon turns into a tumultuous nightmare of delusion, precognition and conspiracy.

The Penultimate Truth

What if you discovered that everything you knew about the world was a lie? That’s the question at the heart of Philip K. Dick s futuristic novel about political oppression, the show business of politics and the sinister potential of the military industrial complex. This wry, paranoid thriller imagines a future in which the earth has been ravaged, and cities are burnt out wastelands too dangerous for human life. Americans have been shipped underground, where they toil in crowded industrial ant hills and receive a steady diet of inspiring speeches from a President who never seems to age. Nick St. James, like the rest of the masses, believed in the words of his leaders. But that all changes when he travels to the surface where what he finds is more shocking than anything he could possibly imagine. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utlizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

The Simulacra

Set in the middle of the twenty first century, The Simulacra is the story of an America where the whole government is a fraud and the President is an android. Against this backdrop Dr. Superb, the sole remaining psychotherapist, is struggling to practice in a world full of the maladjusted. Ian Duncan is desperately in love with the first lady, Nicole Thibideaux, who he has never met. Richard Kongrosian refuses to see anyone because he is convinced his body odor is lethal. And the fascistic Bertold Goltz is trying to overthrow the government. With wonderful aplomb, Philip K. Dick brings this story to a crashing conclusion and in classic fashion shows there is always another layer of conspiracy beneath the one we see.

Clans of the Alphane Moon

World War Terminus had left the Earth devastated. Through its ruins, bounty hunter Rick Deckard stalked, in search of the renegade replicants who were his prey. When he wasn t retiring them with his laser weapon, he dreamed of owning a live animal the ultimate status symbol in a world all but bereft of animal life. Then Rick got his chance: the assignment to kill six Nexus 6 targets, for a huge reward. But in Deckard’s world things were never that simple, and his assignment quickly turned into a nightmare kaleidoscope of subterfuge and deceit and the threat of death for the hunter rather than the hunted…

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch

For the exiles from a blistering Earth, Mars is a lonely place, made bearable only by drugs, specifically Can D, which translates those who take in into a shared hallucination of a Barbie esque world. But the new drug Chew Z promises more than thateternal life itself. But it a world where everyone is tripping, no promises can be taken at face value. When those promises come from Palmer Eldritch, who may be human, alien, or god, they can be trusted even less.

Martian Time-Slip

On the arid colony of Mars the only thing more precious than water may be a ten year old schizophrenic boy named Manfred Steiner. For although the UN has slated ‘anomalous’ children for deportation and destruction, other people especially Supreme Goodmember Arnie Kott of the Water Worker’s union suspect that Manfred’s disorder may be a window into the future. In Martian Time Slip Philip K. Dick uses power politics and extraterrestrial real estate scams, adultery, and murder to penetrate the mysteries of being and time. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Dr. Bloodmoney, or How We Got Along After the Bomb

What happens after the bombs drop? This is the troubling question that Philip K. Dick addresses with Dr. Bloodmoney, or How We Got Along After the Bomb. It is the story of a world reeling from the effects of nuclear annihilation and fallout, a world where mutated humans and animals are the norm, and the scattered survivors take comfort from a disc jockey endlessly circling the globe in a broken down satellite. And hidden amongst the survivors is Dr. Bloodmoney himself, the man responsible for it all. A sort of companion to Dr. Strangelove, Dick’s novel is just as full of dark comedy and just as chilling.

Now Wait for Last Year

In a novel that makes our notions of politics, personality, and time seem terrifyingly provisional, Dick tells of a hapless doctor, whose planet is enmeshed in endless war, whose wife is addicted to a time control drug, and whose newest patient’s demise could decide the fate of the world.

The Crack in Space

In The Crack in Space, a repairman discovers that a hole in a faulty Jifi scuttler leads to a parallel world. Jim Briskin, campaigning to be the first black president of the United States, thinks alter Earth is the solution to the chronic overpopulation that has seventy million people cryogenically frozen; Tito Cravelli, a shadowy private detective, wants to know why Dr Lurton Sands is hiding his mistress on the planet; billionaire mutant George Walt wants to make the empty world all his own. But when the other earth turns out to be inhabited, everything changes. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utilizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

Counter-Clock World

In Counter Clock World, one of the most theologically probing of all of Dick’s books, the world has entered the Hobart Phase a vast sidereal process in which time moves in reverse. As a result, libraries are busy eradicating books, copulation signifies the end of pregnancy, people greet with, Good bye, and part with, Hello, and underneath the world s tombstones, the dead are coming back to life. One imminent old born is Anarch Peak, a vibrant religious leader whose followers continued to flourish long after his death. His return from the dead has such awesome implications that those who apprehend him will very likely be those who control the fate of the world. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utilizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

The Zap Gun

Scaldingly sarcastic yet enduringly empathetic, The Zap Gun is Dick’s remarkable novel depicting the insanity of the arms race. Lars Powderdry and Lilo Topchev are counterpart weapons fashion designers for a world divided into two factions Wes bloc and Peep East. Since the Plowshare Protocols of 2002, their job has been to invent elaborate weapons that only seem massively lethal. But when alien satellites hostile to both sides appear in the sky, the two are brought together in the dire hope that they can create a weapon to save the world, a task made all the more difficult by Lars falling in love with Lilo even as he knows she s trying to kill him.

Galactic Pot-Healer

What could an omnipresent and seemingly omnipotent entity want with a humble pot healer? Or with the dozens of other odd creatures it has lured to Plowman’s Planet? And if the Glimmung is a god, are its ends positive or malign? Combining quixotic adventure, spine chilling horror, and deliriously paranoid theology, Galactic Pot Healer is a uniquely Dickian voyage to alternate worlds of the imagination.

We Can Build You

Louis Rosen and his partners sell people ingeniously designed, historically authentic simulacra of personages such as Edwin M. Stanton and Abraham Lincoln. The problem is that the only prospective buyer is a rapacious billionaire whose plans for the simulacra could land Louis in jail. Then there’s the added complication that someone or something like Abraham Lincoln may not want to be sold. Is an electronic Lincoln any less alive than his creators? Is a machine that cares and suffers inferior to the woman Louis loves a borderline psychopath who does neither? With irresistible momentum, intelligence, and wit, Philip K. Dick creates an arresting techno thriller that suggests a marriage of Bladerunner and Barbarians at the Gate.

Ubik

An accident has occurred. Joe Chip and his colleagues all but one of them have narrowly escaped an explosion at a moon base. Or is it the other way round? Did Joe and the others die, and did the one fatality, Glen Runciter, actually survive?…
From the stuff of space opera, Dick spins a deeply unsettling existential horror story, a nightmare you ll never be sure you ve woken up from. Lev Grossman, Time In 1974, Philip K. Dick was commissioned to write a screenplay based on his novel Ubik. The film was eventually scrapped, but the screenplay was saved and later published in 1985. Featuring scenes that are not in the book and a surreal playfulness the style of the writing goes back in time just like the technology in the book’s dreamworld this screenplay is the only one Dick wrote and features his signature mix of paranoia, humor, and big idea philosophy.

A Maze of Death

Fourteen strangers came to Delmak O. Thirteen of them were transferred by the usual authorities. One got there by praying. But once they arrived on that planet whose very atmosphere seemed to induce paranoia and psychosis, the newcomers found that even prayer was useless. For on Delmak O, God is either absent or intent on destroying His creations.

Our Friends From Frolix 8

For all the strange worlds borne of his vast and vivid imagination, Philip K. Dick was largely concerned with humanity’s most achingly familiar heartaches and struggles. In Our Friends From Frolix 8, he clashes private dreams against public battles in a fast paced and provocative tale that ultimately addresses our salvation both as individuals and a whole. Nick Appleton is a menial laborer whose life is a series of endless frustrations. Willis Gram is the despotic oligarch of a planet ruled by big brained elites. When they both fall in love with Charlotte Boyer, a feisty black marketer of revolutionary propaganda, Nick seems destined for doom. But everything takes a decidedly unpredictable turn when the revolution s leader, Thors Provoni, returns from ten years of intergalactic hiding with a ninety ton protoplasmic slime that is bent on creating a new world order. Winner of both the Hugo and John W. Campbell awards for best novel, widely regarded as the premiere science fiction writer of his day, and the object of cult like adoration from his legions of fans, Philip K. Dick has come to be seen in a literary light that defies classification in much the same way as Borges and Calvino. With breathtaking insight, he utilizes vividly unfamiliar worlds to evoke the hauntingly and hilariously familiar in our society and ourselves.

Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said

On October 11 the television star Jason Taverner is so famous that 30 million viewers eagerly watch his prime time show. On October 12 Jason Taverner is not a has been but a never was a man who has lost not only his audience but all proof of his existence. And in the claustrophobic betrayal state of Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, loss of proof is synonyms with loss of life. Taverner races to solve the riddle of his disappearance’, immerses us in a horribly plausible Philip K. Dick United States in which everyone from a waiflike forger of identity cards to a surgically altered pleasure informs on everyone else, a world in which omniscient police have something to hide. His bleakly beautiful novel bores into the deepest bedrock self and plants a stick of dynamite at its center.

Deus Irae (With: Roger Zelazny)

In the years following World War III, a new and powerful faith has arisen from a scorched and poisoned Earth, a faith that embraces the architect of world wide devastation. The Servants of Wrath have deified Carlton Lufteufel and re christened him the Deus Irae. In the small community of Charlottesville, Utah, Tibor McMasters, born without arms or legs, has, through an array of prostheses, established a far reaching reputation as an inspired painter. When the new church commissions a grand mural depicting the Deus Irae, it falls upon Tibor to make a treacherous journey to find the man, to find the god, and capture his terrible visage for posterity.

A Scanner Darkly

A haunting graphic version of one of Philip K. Dick’s most popular and best selling novels. Bob Arctor is a dealer of the lethally addictive drug Substance D, which he also takes in massive quantities. Fred is the police agent assigned to tail and eventually bust him. What Fred doesn t know is that Substance D gradually splits the user s brain into two distinct, combative entities, and that he is, in fact, in frantic pursuit of himself. A Scanner Darkly is caustically funny and razor sharp in its depiction of drug induced paranoia and madness; it s an industrial strength stress test of identity as unnerving as it is riveting. The novel is captured in this brilliant graphic vision, composed entirely of stills from the movie. Writer/Director Richard Linklater shot a live action film, starring Keanu Reeves, Robert Downey Jr., Woody Harrelson, and Winona Ryder, and then animated over the underlying images. The result is an eerily lifelike, richly detailed animation that translates beautifully to the page.

Lies, Inc.

A masterwork by Philip K. Dick, this is the final, expanded version of the novellla The Unteleported Man, which Dick worked on shortly before his death. In Lies, Inc., fans of the science fiction legend will immediately recognize his hallmark themes of life in a security state, conspiracy, and the blurring of reality and illusion. This publication marks its first complete appearance in the United States. In this wry, paranoid vision of the future, overpopulation has turned cities into cramed industrial anthills. For those sick of this dystopian reality, one corporation, Trails of Hoffman, Inc., promises an alternative: Take a teleport to Whale’s Mouth, a colonized planet billed as the supreme paradise. The only catch is that you can never comeback. When a neurotic man named Rachmael ben Applebaum discovers that the promotional films of happy crowds cheering their newfound existence on Whale’s Mouth are faked, he decides to pilot a scapeship on the eighteen year journey there to see if anyone wants to return.

In Milton Lumky Territory

In The Novels of Philip K. Dick, Kim Stanley Robinson states that ‘In Milton Lumky Territory
is probably the best of Dick’s realist novels aside from Confessions of a Crap Artist,’ and calls it a ‘bitter indictment of the effects of capitalism.’ Dick, on the other hand, in his forward, says ‘This is actually a very funny book, and a good one, too.’Milton Lumky territory is both an area of the western USA and a psychic terrain: the world and world view of the traveling salesman. The story takes place in Boise, Idaho, with some extraordinary long distance driving sequences in which our hero young Bruce Stevens drives from Boise to San Francisco, to Reno, to Pocatello, to Seattle, and back to Boise in search of a good deal on some wholesale typewriters. He falls under the spell of an attractive older woman who used to be his school teacher and Milton Lumky, a middle aged paper salesman whose territory is the Northwest. And then Bruce and the others slowly sink into the whirlpool of his immature personal obsessions and misperceptions.A compassionate and ironic portrayal of three characters enmeshed in a sticky web of everyday events, in a tension between love and money, with a basic failure to communicate, In Milton Lumky Territory stands out among Dick’s early works.

The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike

The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike was written by Philip K. Dick in the winter and spring of 1960, in Point Reyes Station, California. In the sequence of Dick’s work, it was written immediately after Confessions of a Crap Artist and just before The Man in the High Castle, the Hugo Award winning science fiction novel that ushered in the next stage of Dick s career. This novel, Dick said, is about Leo Runcible, a brilliant, civic minded liberal Jew living in a rural WASP town in Marin County, California. Runcible, a real estate agent involved in a local battle with a neighbor, finds what look like Neanderthal bones in Marin and dreams of rising real estate prices because of the publicity. But it turns out that the remains are more recent, the result of an environmental problem polluting the local water supply.

Radio Free Albemuth

Philip K. Dick’s impassioned final novel is a wild and visionary alternate history of the United States. It is 1969, and a paranoid president has convulsed America in a vicious war against imaginary internal enemies. As the country slides into fascism, a struggling science fiction writer named Philip K. Dick is trying to keep from becoming one of that war s casualties. Meanwhile, Dick s best friend, a record executive named Nicholas Brady, is receiving transmissions from an extraterrestrial intelligence, which he dubs Valis, who apparently wants him to overthrow the president. Agonizingly suspenseful, darkly hilarious, and filled with enough conspiracy theories to thrill the most hardened paranoid, Radio Free Albemuth is proof of Dick’s stature as our century’s greatest science fiction writer.

Puttering About in a Small Land

When Roger and Virginia Lindhal enroll their son Gregg in Mrs. Alt’s Los Padres Valley School in the mountains of Southern California, their marriage is already in deep trouble. Then the Lindhals meet Chic and Liz Bonner, whose two sons also board at Mrs. Alt s school. The meeting is a catalyst for a complicated series of emotions and traumas, set against the backdrop of suburban Los Angeles in the early fifties. The buildup of emotional intensity and the finely observed characterizations are a hallmark of Philip K. Dick s work. This is a realistic novel filled with details of everyday life and skillfully told from three points of view. It is powerful, eloquent, and gripping.

Humpty Dumpty in Oakland

The first US paperback edition of this classic Philip K. Dick novelSet in the San Francisco Bay area in the late 1950s, Humpty Dumpty in Oakland is a tragicomedy of misunderstandings among used car dealers and real estate salesmen: the small time, struggling individuals for whom Philip K. Dick always reserved his greatest sympathy. Jim Fergesson, an elderly garage owner with a heart condition, is about to sell up and retire; Al Miller is a somewhat feckless mechanic who sublets part of Jim’s lot and finds his livelihood threatened by the decision to sell; Chris Harman is a record company owner who for years has relied on Fergesson to maintain his cars. When Harman hears of Fergesson s impending retirement he tips him off to what he says is a cast iron business proposition: a development in nearby Marin County with an opening for a garage. Al Miller, though, is convinced that Harman is a crook, out to fleece Fergesson of his life s savings. As much as he resents Fergesson he can t bear to see that happen and denying to himself all the time what he is doing he sets out to thwart Harman.

Mary and the Giant

Mary Anne Reynolds is a young and vulnerable woman, determined to make her own way in the world. But Pacific Park, California, in the 1950s is not really the place for Mary. Her relationship with a black singer offends against the small town’s views on sexual mores and exposes its bigoted views on race. This is a powerful portrayal of the claustrophobia of small town California, and Mary Anne Reynolds is one of the most memorable characters Dick ever created.

Nick and the Glimmung

The first U.S. edition of Philip K. Dick’s only YA sf novel.

The Broken Bubble

This is the British paperback edition of this novel. Dick first wrote this book in the 1950’s, but it remained unplublished until 1988. ‘The Broken Bubble is set in San Francisco in 1956 and focuses on four characters: local radio DJ Jim Briskin, his ex wife Patricia Gray, and a young married couple, Art and Rachael Emmanuel, who are fans of Briskin’s. Briskin is suspended from his job when he refuses to read a particularly repellent commercial, and Art becomes mixed up with an absurd group of would be revolutionaries, but the novel primarily concerns the shifting relationships between Jim and Pat and Art and Rachael as they become entangled, and not quite disentangled, seeking only in typical Dick fashion to live more or Iess happily, if not ever after, then at least for a while. With its acutely observed characters and sympathetic black comedy, The Broken Bubble is another highly enjoyable novel.’

Voices from the Street

Stuart Hadley is a young radio electronics salesman in early 1950s Oakland, California. He has what many would consider the ideal life; a nice house, a pretty wife, a decent job with prospects for advancement, but he still feels unfulfilled; something is missing from his life. Hadley is an angry young man an artist, a dreamer, a screw up. He tries to fill his void first with drinking, and sex, and then with religious fanaticism, but nothing seems to be working, and it is driving him crazy. He reacts to the love of his wife and the kindness of his employer with anxiety and fear. One of the earliest books that Dick ever wrote, and the only novel that has never been published, Voices from the Street is the story of Hadley’s descent into depression and madness, and out the other side. Most known in his lifetime as a science fiction writer, Philip K. Dick is growing in reputation as an American writer whose powerful vision is an ironic reflection of the present. This novel completes the publication of his canon.

The Minority Report

Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his life in California. The author of thirty six novels, including the acclaimed Blade Runner, and five short story collections, he won a Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle, and a John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. He died in 1982. In the world of The Minority Report, Commissioner John Anderton is the one to thank for the lack of crime. He is the originator of the Precrime System, which uses ‘precogs’ people with the power to see into the future to identify criminals before they can do any harm. Unfortunately for Anderton, his precogs perceive him as the next criminal. But Anderton knows he has never contemplated such a thing, and this knowledge proves the precogs are fallible. Now, whichever way he turns, Anderton is doomed unless he can find the precogs’s ‘minority report’ the dissenting voice that represents his one hope of getting at the truth in time to save himself from his own system.A film version of The Minority Report, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Cruise, will be released this summer further proof of the enduring appeal of Philip K. Dick’s visionary fiction.

The Defenders and Three Others

Four classic tales by Philip K. Dick! Here are ‘The Defenders,’ in which mankind has taken refuge beneath the Earth’s surface, leaving all-out war to robots…
‘Beyond Lies the Wub,’ in which a highly philosophical Martian creature finds itself on the wrong end of the dinner table…
‘The Crystal Crypt,’ in which the last Terran ship from Mars finds terrorists aboard…
and ‘Beyond the Door,’ a most unusual story in which an abusive husband ends up with more than he bargains for!

The Variable Man and Other Stories

The Variable Man, one of Philip Dick’s early works, provides a great insight into the author’s development as a writer.

We Can Remember It for You Wholesale

Many thousands of readers consider Philip K. Dick the greatest science fiction mind on any planet. Since his untimely death in 1982, interest in Dick’s works has continued to mount and his reputation has been further enhanced by a growing body of critical attention. The Philip K. Dick Award is now given annually to a distinguished work of science fiction, and the Philip K. Dick Society is devoted to the study and promulgation of his works. This collection includes all of the writer’s earliest short and medium length fiction including some previously unpublished stories covering the years 1952 1955. These fascinating stories include We Can Remember It for You Wholesale, The Cookie Lady, The World She Wanted, and many others.’A useful acquisition for any serious SF library or collection’. Kirkus Reviews’The collected stories of Philip K. Dick is awe inspiring’. The Washington Post’More than anyone else in the field, Mr. Dick really puts you inside people’s minds’. Wall Street Journal

Second Variety

Many thousands of readers consider Philip K. Dick the greatest science fiction mind on any planet. Since his untimely death in 1982, interest in Dick’s works has continued to mount and his reputation has been further enhanced by a growing body of critical attention. The Philip K. Dick Award is now given annually to a distinguished work of science fiction, and the Philip K. Dick Society is devoted to the study and promulgation of his works. This collection includes all of the writer’s earliest short and medium length fiction including some previously unpublished stories covering the years 1952 1955. These fascinating stories include Second Variety, Foster, You’re Dead and The Father Thing, and many others.’A useful acquisition for any serious SF library or collection’. Kirkus’The collected stories of Philip K. Dick is awe inspiring’. The Washington Post’More than anyone else in the field, Mr. Dick really puts you inside people’s minds’. Wall Street Journal

A Scanner Darkly

A haunting graphic version of one of Philip K. Dick’s most popular and best selling novels. Bob Arctor is a dealer of the lethally addictive drug Substance D, which he also takes in massive quantities. Fred is the police agent assigned to tail and eventually bust him. What Fred doesn t know is that Substance D gradually splits the user s brain into two distinct, combative entities, and that he is, in fact, in frantic pursuit of himself. A Scanner Darkly is caustically funny and razor sharp in its depiction of drug induced paranoia and madness; it s an industrial strength stress test of identity as unnerving as it is riveting. The novel is captured in this brilliant graphic vision, composed entirely of stills from the movie. Writer/Director Richard Linklater shot a live action film, starring Keanu Reeves, Robert Downey Jr., Woody Harrelson, and Winona Ryder, and then animated over the underlying images. The result is an eerily lifelike, richly detailed animation that translates beautifully to the page.

Confessions of a Crap Artist

Confessions of a Crap Artist is one of Philip K. Dick’s weirdest and most accomplished novels. Jack Isidore is a crap artist a collector of crackpot ideas among other things, he believes that the earth is hallow and that sunlight has weight and worthless objects, a man so grossly unequipped for real life that his sister and brother in law feel compelled to rescue him from it. But seen through Jack’s murderously innocent gaze, Charlie and Juddy Hume prove to be just as sealed off from reality, in thrall to obsessions that are slightly more acceptable than Jack’s, but a great deal uglier.’One of the most original practitioners writing any kind of fiction.’ The Sunday Times London’Dick is entertaining us about reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation…
. We have our own homegrown Barges.’ Ursula K. LeGuin, New Republic’Philip K. Dick’s best books always describe a future that is both entirely recognizable and utterly unimaginable? The New York Times Book Review

What If Our World is Their Heaven?

In the field of science fiction, the work of Philip K Dick is unparalleled. His novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? became the classic science fiction film Blade Runner. His short story, ‘The Minority Report,’ was recently adapted for the screen by Stephen Spielberg and stars Tom Cruise. Dick’s appeal and influence has reached the world over, creating the standard for the literary science fiction novel. In November of 1982, six months before the author’s death, journalist Gwen Lee recorded the first of several in depth discussions with Philip K. Dick that continued over the course over the next three months. These extraordinary interviews are filled with the wit and aplomb characteristic of Dick’s writing, helping make What If Our World is Their Heaven?? not only an engaging read, but a unique and compelling historical document. It will be a must read for anyone interested in the field of science fiction.

The Shifting Realities of Philip K. Dick

In a collection of philosophical essays, journal excerpts, speeches, and interviews, the pioneering science fiction writer discusses the union of physics and metaphysics, the impact of virtual reality, and the challenges of basic human values in an age of technology and spiritual decline.

Dangerous Visions

Anthologies seldom make history, but Dangerous Visions is a grand exception. Harlan Ellison’s 1967 collection of science fiction stories set an almost impossibly high standard, as more than a half dozen of its stories won major awards not surpising with a contributors list that reads like a who’s who of 20th century SF: Samuel D. Delany, Philip K. Dick, Brian Aldiss, Roger Zelazny, Philip Jose Farmer, Fritz Leiber, Larry Niven and Robert Silverberg. Unavailable for 15 years, this huge anthology now returns to print, as relevant now as when it was first published.

The Best from Fantasy and Science Fiction 24

An anthology of short stories and readers’ contributions to contests published in ‘Fantasy & Science Fiction.’

The Third Omni Book of Science Fiction

Vintage, 1985 paperback, Zebra Books, 479 pages. This is a collection of short stories from Omni magazine some of the language is objectionable.

Spells of Enchantment: The Wondrous Fairy Tales of Western Culture

Zipes brings together the best literary fairy tales ever written, giving readers a sense of the history of the genre and its evolution. Includes more than 60 tales by writers such as Hans Christian Andersen, Wilhelm Grimm, Voltaire, Goethe, Hawthorne, Yeats, Hesse, Thurber, Jane Yolen, Angela Carter, and more. Illustrated.

Inside the Funhouse

A collection of seventeen tales of science fiction features works by Isaac Asimov, Philip K. Dick, Frederik Pohl, George Alec Effinger, Jane Yolen, Ian Watson, Barry N. Malzberg, Patricia Nurse, and others.

New Skies: An Anthology of Today’s Science Fiction

New Skies…
imaginative stories for a new generation of science fiction fans. Here are writers such as Philip K. Dick, Orson Scott Card, Jane Yolen, Greg Bear, Kim Stanley Robinson, Steven Gould, Connie Willis, Spider Robinson, and many more. Here is a careening adventure along the outside of a tower looming miles above the ground, and a tale of desperate survival on the deadly surface of the Moon. Here is a world in which children divorce their parents, and the story of a four dimensional boy in a three dimensional world. Here are future young people rebuilding after terrible disasters, and here is a story of the future development of baseball on Mars.

Nightmarish or whimsical, irreverent or swashbuckling, each of these stories is an adventure in imagination. Journey from the here and now into New Skies.

The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction

The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction features over a 150 years’ worth of the best science fiction ever collected in a single volume. The fifty two stories and critical introductions are organized chronologically as well as thematically for classroom use. Filled with luminous ideas, otherworldly adventures, and startling futuristic speculations, these stories will appeal to all readers as they chart the emergence and evolution of science fiction as a modern literary genre. They also provide a fascinating look at how our Western technoculture has imaginatively expressed its hopes and fears from the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century to the digital age of today. A free online teacher’s guide at www. wesleyan. edu/wespress/sfanthologyguide accompanies the anthology and offers access to a host of pedagogical aids for using this book in an academic setting. The stories in this anthology have been selected and introduced by the editors of Science Fiction Studies, the world’s most respected journal for the critical study of science fiction.

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