Patrick Rothfuss Books In Order

Kingkiller Chronicle Books In Publication Order

  1. The Name of the Wind (2007)
  2. The Wise Man’s Fear (2011)
  3. The Slow Regard of Silent Things (2014)

Adventures Of Princess & Mr. Whiffle Books In Publication Order

  1. The Thing Beneath the Bed (2010)
  2. The Dark of Deep Below (2013)
  3. The Princess and Mr. Whiffle Coloring Book (2014)

Graphic Novels In Publication Order

  1. Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons (2019)

Anthologies In Publication Order

  1. Rogues (2014)
  2. The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Novellas 2015 (2015)

Kingkiller Chronicle Book Covers

Adventures Of Princess & Mr. Whiffle Book Covers

Graphic Novels Book Covers

Anthologies Book Covers

Patrick Rothfuss Books Overview

The Name of the Wind

‘I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep. My name is Kvothe. You may have heard of me’ So begins the tale of Kvothe currently known as Kote, the unassuming innkeepter from his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, through his years spent as a near feral orphan in a crime riddled city, to his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a difficult and dangerous school of magic. In these pages you will come to know Kvothe the notorious magician, the accomplished thief, the masterful musician, the dragon slayer, the legend hunter, the lover, the thief and the infamous assassin. The Name of the Wind is fantasy at its very best, and an astounding must read title.

The Wise Man’s Fear

My name is Kvothe. I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep. You may have heard of me. So begins the tale of a hero told from his own point of view – a story unequaled in fantasy literature. Now in The Wise Man’s Fear, Day Two of The Kingkiller Chronicle, an escalating rivalry with a powerful member of the nobility forces Kvothe to leave the University and seek his fortune abroad. Adrift, penniless, and alone, he travels to Vintas, where he quickly becomes entangled in the politics of courtly society. While attempting to curry favor with a powerful noble, Kvothe uncovers an assassination attempt, comes into conflict with a rival arcanist, and leads a group of mercenaries into the wild, in an attempt to solve the mystery of who or what is waylaying travelers on the King’s Road. All the while, Kvothe searches for answers, attempting to uncover the truth about the mysterious Amyr, the Chandrian, and the death of his parents. Along the way, Kvothe is put on trial by the legendary Adem mercenaries, is forced to reclaim the honor of the Edema Ruh, and travels into the Fae realm. There he meets Felurian, the faerie woman no man can resist, and who no man has ever survived…
until Kvothe. In THE WISE MAN’S FEAR, Kvothe takes his first steps on the path of the hero and learns how difficult life can be when a man becomes a legend in his own time.

The Thing Beneath the Bed

This is not a book for children. It looks like a children’s book. It has pictures. It has a saccharine sweet title. The main characters are a little girl and her teddy bear. But all of that is just protective coloration. The truth is, this is a book for adults with a dark sense of humor and an appreciation of old school faerie tales. There are three separate endings to the book. Depending on where you stop, you are left with an entirely different story. One ending is sweet, another is horrible. The last one is the true ending, the one with teeth in it. The Adventures of the Princess and Mr. Whiffle is a dark twist on the classic children’s picture book. I think of it as Calvin and Hobbes meets Coraline, with some Edward Gorey mixed in. Simply said: This is not a book for children.

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