L. Frank Baum Books In Order

Oz Books In Publication Order

  1. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz / The Wizard of Oz (1900)
  2. The Marvelous Land of Oz / The Land of Oz (1904)
  3. Ozma of Oz (1907)
  4. Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908)
  5. The Road to Oz (1909)
  6. The Emerald City of Oz (1910)
  7. The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913)
  8. Tik-Tok of Oz (1914)
  9. The Scarecrow of Oz (1915)
  10. Rinkitink in Oz (1916)
  11. The Lost Princess of Oz (1917)
  12. The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918)
  13. The Magic of Oz (1919)
  14. Glinda of Oz (1920)

Oz Children’s Books In Publication Order

  1. The Woggle-Bug Book (1905)
  2. TikTok and the Nome King (1913)

Oz Collections In Publication Order

  1. Queer Visitors from the Marvelous Land of Oz (1905)
  2. Little Wizard Stories of Oz (1913)

Marvel’s Oz Graphic Novels In Publication Order

  1. The Marvelous Land of Oz (By:Eric Shanower) (2010)
  2. Oz: The Marvelous Land of Oz (With: Eric Shanower) (2010)
  3. Oz: Dorothy & the Wizard in Oz (By:Eric Shanower) (2011)
  4. The Emerald City of Oz (By:Eric Shanower) (2014)

Aunt Jane’s Nieces Books In Publication Order

  1. Aunt Jane’s Nieces (1906)
  2. Aunt Jane’s Nieces Abroad (1907)
  3. Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Millville (1908)
  4. Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Work (1909)
  5. Aunt Jane’s Nieces In Society (1910)
  6. Aunt Jane’s Nieces and Uncle John (1911)
  7. Aunt Jane’s Nieces on Vacation (1912)
  8. Aunt Jane’s Nieces on the Ranch (1913)
  9. Aunt Jane’s Nieces Out West (1914)
  10. Aunt Jane’s Nieces in the Red Cross (1915)

Boy Fortune Hunters Books In Publication Order

  1. The Boy Fortune Hunters of Alaska (1906)
  2. The Boy Fortune Hunters in Panama (1907)
  3. The Boy Fortune Hunters in Egypt (1908)
  4. The Boy Fortune Hunters in China (1909)
  5. The Boy Fortune Hunters in Yucatan (1910)
  6. The Boy Fortune Hunters in the South Seas (1911)

Daring Twins Books In Publication Order

  1. The Secret of the Lost Fortune (1911)
  2. Phoebe Daring (1912)

Flying Girl Books In Publication Order

  1. The Flying Girl (1911)
  2. The Flying Girl and Her Chum (1911)

Magical Creatures Books In Publication Order

  1. A Kidnapped Santa Claus (1904)

Mary Louise Books In Publication Order

  1. Mary Louise (1916)
  2. Mary Louise in the Country (1916)
  3. Mary Louise Solves a Mystery (1917)
  4. Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls (1918)
  5. Mary Louise Adopts a Soldier (1919)
  6. Mary Louise and Josie O’Gorman (By:Emma Speed Sampson) (1922)

Prairie Tales Books In Publication Order

  1. The Discontented Gopher (1905)

Trot & Cap’n Bill Books In Publication Order

  1. The Sea Fairies (1911)
  2. Sky Island (1912)

Standalone Novels In Publication Order

  1. Our Landlady (1891)
  2. Dot and Tot of Merryland (1901)
  3. The Master Key (1902)
  4. The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus (1902)
  5. The Enchanted Island of Yew (1903)
  6. Queen Zixi of Ix (1905)
  7. The Fate of a Crown (As:Schuyler Staunton) (1905)
  8. Annabel (By:) (1906)
  9. John Dough and the Cherub (1906)
  10. Annabel (By:) (1906)
  11. Daughters of Destiny (As: Schuyler Staunton) (1906)
  12. Policeman Bluejay / Babes in Birdland (As: Laura Bancroft) (1907)
  13. Tamawaca Folks (As: John Estes Cooke) (1907)
  14. The Last Egyptian (1908)
  15. Jaglon and the Tiger Fairies (1953)
  16. The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People (1968)

Short Story Collections In Publication Order

  1. Mother Goose in Prose (1897)
  2. By the Candelabra’s Glare (1898)
  3. Father Goose, His Book (1899)
  4. A New Wonderland / The Magical Monarch of Mo (1900)
  5. The Army Alphabet (1900)
  6. The Navy Alphabet (1900)
  7. American Fairy Tales (1901)
  8. Twinkle and Chubbins: Their Astonishing Adventures in Nature-Fairyland (As: Laura Bancroft) (1906)
  9. Father Goose’s Year Book (1907)
  10. The Oz-Man Tales: The Yellow Hen and Other Stories (1916)
  11. Animal Fairy Tales (1969)
  12. The Purple Dragon and Other Fantasies (1976)

Short Stories/Novellas In Publication Order

  1. Master Key (1901)
  2. The Enchanted Buffalo (1905)
  3. Prairie-Dog Town (1906)
  4. Mr. Woodchuck (As: Laura Bancroft) (1906)
  5. Bandit Jim Crow (As: Laura Bancroft) (1906)
  6. Sugar-Loaf Mountain (As: Laura Bancroft) (1906)
  7. Prince Mud-Turtle (As: Laura Bancroft) (1906)
  8. Twinkle’s Enchantment (As: Laura Bancroft) (1906)

Oz-Story Magazine Books In Publication Order

  1. Oz-Story 1 (With: ) (1995)
  2. Oz-Story 2 (With: Harlan Ellison,Philip José Farmer) (1996)
  3. Oz-Story 3 (By:) (1997)
  4. Oz-Story 4 (By:Eric Shanower) (1998)
  5. Oz-Story 5 (By:Eric Shanower) (1999)
  6. Oz-Story 6 (With: Harlan Ellison,Philip José Farmer) (2000)

Anthologies In Publication Order

  1. Fantasy Stories (1994)
  2. Tales Before Tolkien: The Roots of Modern Fantasy (2003)
  3. The Lady Sleuths MEGAPACK ® (2014)

Oz Book Covers

Oz Children’s Book Covers

Oz Collections Book Covers

Marvel’s Oz Graphic Novels Book Covers

Aunt Jane’s Nieces Book Covers

Boy Fortune Hunters Book Covers

Daring Twins Book Covers

Flying Girl Book Covers

Magical Creatures Book Covers

Mary Louise Book Covers

Prairie Tales Book Covers

Trot & Cap’n Bill Book Covers

Standalone Novels Book Covers

Short Story Collections Book Covers

Short Stories/Novellas Book Covers

Oz-Story Magazine Book Covers

Anthologies Book Covers

L. Frank Baum Books Overview

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz / The Wizard of Oz

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences biographical, historical, and literary to enrich each reader’s understanding of these enduring works. Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion they re now as beloved a part of American folklore as Johnny Appleseed and Paul Bunyan. Since its first publication in 1900, L. Frank Baum’s story of a little girl carried away by a tornado to the strange and beautiful Land of Oz has had an extraordinary emotional impact on wide eyed readers young and old. As Dorothy journeys down the yellow brick road to the Emerald City, hoping the Great and Terrible Wizard who lives there will help her return home, she shares adventures with the famous trio of characters, defeats a wicked witch, and learns about the power of friendship, loyalty, and self confidence. While scholars have debated for decades over possible political meanings hidden within the tale, Baum himself claimed he simply wanted to write a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained and the heartaches and nightmares are left out. As it has done for generations past, this classic of fantasy adventure speaks movingly about what every child needs: the Woodman s compassion, the Lion s courage, and the Scarecrow s wisdom. With original illustrations by William Wallace Denslow.J. T. Barbarese teaches at Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey, where he is a member of the Rutgers Center for Children and Childhood Studies. He is the author of four books of poetry and a translation of Euripides.

The Marvelous Land of Oz / The Land of Oz

‘The Marvelous Land of Oz, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz, published on July 5, 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baum’s books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. It is the only book in the series in which Dorothy Gale does not appear. This and the next 34 Oz books of the famous forty were illustrated by John R. Neill.’ Quote from wikipedia. org

About the Author

‘Lyman Frank Baum May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919 was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works 55 novels in total, 82 short stories, over 200 poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen.

Baum was born in Chittenango, New York, into a devout Methodist family of German father’s side and Scots-Irish mother’s side origin, the fifth of six children born to Cynthia Stanton and Benjamin Ward Baum, only three of whom survived into adulthood. He was named ‘Lyman’ after his father’s brother, but always disliked this name, and preferred to go by his middle name, ‘Frank’. His mother, Cynthia Stanton, was a direct descendant of Thomas Stanton, one of the four Founders of what is now Stonington, Connecticut.’ Quote from wikipedia. org

Table of Contents

Publisher’s Preface; Author’s Note; Tip Manufactures A Pumpkinhead; The Marvelous Powder Of Life; The Flight Of The Fugitives; Tip Makes An Experiment In Magic; The Awakening Of The Saw-horse; Jack Pumpkinhead’s Ride To The Emerald City; His Majesty

Ozma of Oz

Readers of all ages will welcome the chance to be reunited with Dorothy Gale and such beloved characters as the Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, and Cowardly Lion, as well as to meet new favorites such as the Hungry Tiger, whose appetite is never satisfied; Princess Langwidere, who has thirty heads; Billina, a talking chicken; and Tiktok, a mechanical man. Blown overboard while sailing with her uncle, Dorothy finds herself in the fairy realm of Ev. She sets out with her friends to rescue the Queen of Ev and her ten children, who have been imprisoned by the cruel Nome King. But even Ozma, the wise Ruler of Oz, is no match for the clever king, and it’s up to Dorothy to save everyone from terrible danger. But will the Nome King’s enchantments be too much even for the plucky little girl from Kansas?Ozma of Oz has delighted children and adults for over eighty years, and now new generations can enjoy the unforgettable characters and the surprising and funny story in this deluxe facsimile of the rare first edition, featuring forty two of John R. Neill’s full color plates and twenty one two color illustrations, as well as a colorful pictorial binding. Afterword by Peter Glassman. New generations can enjoy this surprising and funny story of the rescue of the royal family of Ev from the evil Nome King in a deluxe facsimile of the rare first edition. A Books of WonderR Classic.

Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz

Fantasy lovers of all ages will rejoice at this chance to travel once again to the marvelous land of Oz!A California earthquake sends Dorothy Gale and her new friends Zeb the farm boy, Jim the cab horse, and Eureka the mischievous kitten tumbling through a crack in the ground. Deep beneath the earth, Dorothy is reunited with her old friend the Wizard of Oz and his troupe of nine tiny piglets. Together, Dorothy, the Wizard, and their friends travel through many fantastic lands, where they encounter the Mangaboos, people growing like vegetables in the ground; cross the Valley of Voe, where dama fruit has turned everyone invisible; and are captured by mysterious flying Gargoyles. At last, the intrepid travelers reach Oz, where they have many unforgettable encounters with such favorites as the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger, Princess Ozma and the wooden Sawhorse. Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz was the fourth Oz adventure. First published in 1908, it has captured the imaginations of young readers and listeners for four generations. Now a new generation can discover these superb adventures for themselves. This deluxe gift edition faithfully reproduces the rare first edition, including all sixteen color plates and all fifty black and white illustrations by John R. Neill, as well as the original colorful endpapers. Afterword by Peter Glassman. A deluxe facsimile of the fourth Oz adventure originally published in 1908 when Dorothy and the Wizard meet the Mangaboos. A Books of WonderR Classic.

The Road to Oz

Dorothy and Toto are off again on an exciting adventure down The Road to Oz!In order to help the lovable, ever wandering Shaggy Man, Dorothy and Toto must journey through magical and mysterious lands. Soon the three are joined by a lost lad named Button Bright and the beautiful young Polychromethe Rainbow’s Daughter. With magic at work and danger about, these new friends must journey through cities of talking beasts, across the Deadly Desert into the Truth Pond, and through many other strange and incredible places before they can reach the Emerald City. Along the way, Dorothy and her companions encounter a whole new assortment of fantastic and funny characters the crafty King Dox of Foxville, the magical donkey King Kik a bray, the terrible bigheaded Scoodlers, and Johnny Dooit who can do anything along with old friends Jack Pumpkinhead, Tik tok, Billina, and, of course, the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow, and the wonderful Wizard himself. The Road to Oz is the fifth adventure in the magical Land of Oz. For the first time since the original 1909 edition, this stunning new facsimile edition illustrates Dorothy’s fantastic adventures on different colors of paper reflecting where she and her friends are on The Road to Oz. Featuring all of John R. Neill’s 126 striking pen and ink drawings, this handsome deluxe edition is one to be treasured for years to come. Afterword by Peter Glassman. This deluxe facsimile of the fifth Oz adventure reunites Dorothy and her friends for Princess Ozma’s glorious birthday party. For the first time since the original 1909 edition, the 126 masterful illustrations are printed on colored papers, exactly as the author intended. A Books of Wonder Classic.

The Emerald City of Oz

Fantasy lovers of all ages will rejoice at this chance to travel once again to the marvelous land of Oz!A California earthquake sends Dorothy Gale and her new friends Zeb the farm boy, Jim the cab horse, and Eureka the mischievous kitten tumbling through a crack in the ground. Deep beneath the earth, Dorothy is reunited with her old friend the Wizard of Oz and his troupe of nine tiny piglets. Together, Dorothy, the Wizard, and their friends travel through many fantastic lands, where they encounter the Mangaboos, people growing like vegetables in the ground; cross the Valley of Voe, where dama fruit has turned everyone invisible; and are captured by mysterious flying Gargoyles. At last, the intrepid travelers reach Oz, where they have many unforgettable encounters with such favorites as the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger, Princess Ozma and the wooden Sawhorse. Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz was the fourth Oz adventure. First published in 1908, it has captured the imaginations of young readers and listeners for four generations. Now a new generation can discover these superb adventures for themselves. This deluxe gift edition faithfully reproduces the rare first edition, including all sixteen color plates and all fifty black and white illustrations by John R. Neill, as well as the original colorful endpapers. Afterword by Peter Glassman. A deluxe facsimile of the fourth Oz adventure originally published in 1908 when Dorothy and the Wizard meet the Mangaboos. A Books of WonderR Classic.

The Patchwork Girl of Oz

In this dazzling tale, L. Frank Baum proves once again his power to delight and enchant readers of all ages. Follow the adventures of a charming new band of characters as they explore the wondrous land of Oz and discover that you learn more by traveling than by staying at home.

Forced to venture out of the dark forest, Unc Nunkie and Ojo the Unlucky call on the Crooked Magician, who introduces them to his latest creation: a living girl made out of patchwork quilts and cotton stuffing. But when an accident leaves beloved Unc Nunkie a motionless statue, it is up to Ojo to save him. In his search for the magic ingredients that will restore his uncle to life, Ojo is joined by the Patchwork Girl and by the conceited Glass Cat, who boasts of her hard ruby heart, the resourceful Shaggy Man, and the lovable block headed Woozy, whose tail hairs are just one of the things Ojo needs to rescue Une Nunkie.

As they travel to the Emerald City, home of the wise and powerful Ozma, they meet Dorothy, the kind and sensible girl from Kansas; the gallant Scarecrow; and, of course, Toto. But no one proves more loyal than the spirited Patchwork Girl, who, although she was brought to life as a servant, is determined to see the wide world for herself.

The Patchwork Girl of Oz has captivated readers for over eighty years. Now, in this stunning new edition featuring all fifty one of John R. Neill’s original full color plates as well as eighty black and white illustrations a whole new generation can discover the beauty and wonder of Oz that have made this classic series an enduring favorite.

Follow the adventures of a charming band of characters as they join Dorothy and the Scarecrow to explore the wondrous Land of Oz. Meet a living girl made out of patchwork quilts, a conceited Glass Cat, and the lovable block headed Woozy. A favorite for over eighty years, this stunning facsimile of the rare fist edition features all fifty one of Neill’s full color plates as well as eighty black and white illustrations. A Books of Wonder Classic.

Tik-Tok of Oz

Webster’s edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of synonyms and antonyms for difficult and often ambiguous English words that are encountered in other works of literature, conversation, or academic examinations. Extremely rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority in the notes compared to words which are difficult, and often encountered in examinations. Rather than supply a single synonym, many are provided for a variety of meanings, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of the English language, and avoid using the notes as a pure crutch. Having the reader decipher a word’s meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. If a difficult word is not noted on a page, chances are that it has been highlighted on a previous page. A more complete thesaurus is supplied at the end of the book; synonyms and antonyms are extracted from Webster’s Online Dictionary. PSAT is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation neither of which sponsors or endorses this book; SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board which neither sponsors nor endorses this book; GRE , AP and Advanced Placement are registered trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which neither sponsors nor endorses this book, GMAT is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admissions Council which is neither affiliated with this book nor endorses this book, LSAT is a registered trademark of the Law School Admissions Council which neither sponsors nor endorses this product. All rights reserved.

The Scarecrow of Oz

Come along on a magical journey to Oz with a whole new group of intrepid adventurers. Trot, a young girl from California, and her peg legged sailor friend, Cap’n Bill, find themselves on a perilous and exciting voyage when a whirlpool leaves them stranded in an underwater cave. There they are befriended by a most curious creature the Ork. With four paddle like wings, legs like a stork’s, a parrot’s head, and a tail like a propeller, the Ork proves to be a very welcome and helpful companion. After escaping the cave, the three friends make their way to the magical Land of Mo, where it snows popcorn and rains lemonade. Here they find Button Bright lost once again and eager to join in their adventures. Together, the four travel across the deadly desert and into the Land of Oz, only to find themselves in new troubles with the scowling King Krewl and Blinkie, a wicked witch. But when everything seems its worst, who should come to their rescue but The Scarecrow of Oz himself! Thanks to the Scarecrow’s wondrous brains, our friends just might have a chance to prevail against their heartless enermes. With twelve glowing color plates and over one hundred black and white drawings by Oz artist John R. Neill, this beautiful reproduction of the rare 1915 first edition is sure to be a welcome addition to every family’s library. Afterword by Peter Glassman. Join young Trot and her peg legged sailor friend, Cap’n Bill, as they are swept off the high seas and into enchanted realms of excitement and adventure. When Cap’n Bill is transformed into a grasshopper by the wicked witch Blinkie, it’s up to Scarecrow to save the day. A Books of Wonder Classic.

Rinkitink in Oz

Meet Rinkitink a kindhearted king who’s as fat and jolly as old Saint Nick himself! When the jovial monarch sails for a visit to the island kingdom of Pingaree, he and his talking goat, Bilbil, are welcomed with open arms. Before long, Rinkitink’s lighthearted ways and merry songs endear him to the king and queen of Pingaree, as well as to their son, Prince Inga.

But when the peaceful isle is invaded by fierce warriors, everyone from the rulers to the smallest child is taken off in chains. Only Prince Inga, Rinkitink, and Bilbil escape the conquerors. And so the three friends set out aided by the magical Pearls of Pingaree to rescue the prince’s people.

Their perilous quest takes them across the vast Nonestic Ocean to the terrible islands of Regos and Coregos to the dark underground domains of the Nome King. Victories are followed by setbacks, which are in turn followed by strokes of good fortune. Just when it seems our friends have met their match in the clever Nome King, Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz arrive to lend a hand.

First published in 1916, this handsome new edition of a much loved classic features all twelve of John R. Neill’s original color plates as well as his nearly one hundred black and white drawings.

Thrilling tale of adventure from a master storyteller, Rinkitink in Oz is sure to enjoyed by Oz fans far and wide and by all who delight in tales of enchantment and adventure.

When the king and queen are kidnapped and their country enslaved, it’s up to the handsome young prince and his friends to save the day. But to defeat such foes as the Chuggenmugger a beast so ferocious it devours dragons even the prince must receivehelp from Dorothy, the Wizard, and their Oz companions. With all twelve of the original full color plates, this handsome new edition of a beloved classic is sure to be enjoyed by all.

The Lost Princess of Oz

Princess Ozma is missing! When Dorothy awakens one morning to discover that the beloved ruler of the Land of Oz has disappeared, all of the Emerald City’s most celebrated citizens join in the search for the lost princess. But Ozma isn’t all that’s gone missing. The magical treasures of Oz have disappeared, too, including the Magic Picture, the Wizard’s black bag, and even Glinda’s Great Book of Records. With no clues to guide them, Ozma’s friends separate into four search parties and spread out across their vast country in a desperate quest for their absent ruler. Deep in the Winkle Country, Dorothy’s search party is soon Joined by Cayke the Cookie Cook, who has lost a magic gold dishpan, and the amazing Frogman, a man sized frog who walks on his hind legs. Together with these new allies, Ozma’s friends learn that their valued possessions aren’t missing but have been stolen by a mysterious villain. If their new foe is powerful enough to steal Princess Ozma and all of their magical treasures, how will they defeat him with no magic of their own?In this 1917 addition to the Oz series, L. Frank Baum delights readers of all ages with a spellbinding mystery that involves nearly every one of the amazing cast of characters that populate America’s favorite fairyland. This handsome new edition featuring all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill’s beautiful color plates and nearly one hundred black and white drawings is the perfect way to join Dorothy and her friends on this exciting journey through the endlessly intriguing Land of Oz. When Dorothy awakens one morning to discover that the beloved ruler of the Land of Oz has disappeared, all of the Emerald City’s most celebrated citizens join in the search for the lost princess. This exciting mystery featuring the twelve original color plates and one hundred drawings involves nearly every one of the amazing cast of characters that populate America’s favorite fairyland.

The Tin Woodman of Oz

Join the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow as they journey across the fantastic magical Land of Oz in search of the Tin Woodman’s long lost sweetheart. In a series of adventures sure to thrill Oz fans both old and new, these beloved friends face such challenges as a selfish giantess and a group of quarrelsome dragons all to fulfill a promise made long ago to a beautiful Munchkin girl. The Tin Woodman sits on the glittering tin throne of his splendid tin castle, ruling the Winkle Country of the Land of Oz with the help of his best friend, the Scarecrow. All is peaceful and well, but when a young wanderer named Woot asks the Tin Woodman how he came to be made of tin, the emperor recalls his days as a flesh and blood woodchopper and his love for Nimmie Amee, a Munchkin girl so fair that the sunsets blushed when they fell upon her. The three quickly decide to set out on a daring quest to reunite the Tin Woodman with his lost love and ask Nimmie Amee to be Empress of the Winkie Country. During their travels, they battle dragons and loons, a mighty sorceress, and an all too hungry beast called the Hippo gy raf. Luckily, they are joined in their search by their old friend Polychrome, the Rainbow’s Daughter, and are aided by Dorothy and Princess Ozma the powerful fairy ruler of the Land of Oz. But just when they think their troubles are over and their quest is complete, they discover a surprise that leaves all of them truly astounded!This deluxe edition of the rare first edition features all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill’s beautiful color plates, along with his nearly one hundred black and white drawings, making this a book sure to be treasured for years to come. In a series of adventures sure to thrill OZ fans both old and new, the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow journey across the magical Land of Oz in search of the Tin Woodman’s long lost sweetheart, a beautiful Munchkin girl. This deluxe edition of the rare first edition features all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill’s beautiful color plates, along with his nearly one hundred black and white drawings, and is a great way to celebrate the upcoming centenary of Oz!

The Magic of Oz

Webster’s edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of synonyms and antonyms for difficult and often ambiguous English words that are encountered in other works of literature, conversation, or academic examinations. Extremely rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority in the notes compared to words which are difficult, and often encountered in examinations. Rather than supply a single synonym, many are provided for a variety of meanings, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of the English language, and avoid using the notes as a pure crutch. Having the reader decipher a word’s meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. If a difficult word is not noted on a page, chances are that it has been highlighted on a previous page. A more complete thesaurus is supplied at the end of the book; synonyms and antonyms are extracted from Webster’s Online Dictionary. PSAT is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation neither of which sponsors or endorses this book; SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board which neither sponsors nor endorses this book; GRE , AP and Advanced Placement are registered trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which neither sponsors nor endorses this book, GMAT is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admissions Council which is neither affiliated with this book nor endorses this book, LSAT is a registered trademark of the Law School Admissions Council which neither sponsors nor endorses this product. All rights reserved.

Glinda of Oz

Peace, prosperity, and happiness are the rule in the marvelous Land of Oz, but in a faraway corner of this magical domain dwell two tribes the Flatheads and the Skeezers who have declared war on each other. Determined to keep her subjects from fighting, the Ruler of Oz, Princess Ozma, along with her dearest friend, Princess Dorothy Gale formerly of Kansas, embarks on a quest to restore peace. When the Supreme Dictator of the Flatheads refuses to cooperate with Ozma, she and Dorothy seek out Queen Coo ee oh of the Skeezers, hoping she will be more reasonable. But the queen imprisons Ozma and Dorothy in her grand city and then traps them by submerging the whole city under water. Now it is up to Glinda the Good to save the day. She assembles all of Ozma’s counsellors including such beloved Oz friends as the Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, Cowardly Lion, Patchwork Girl, Shaggy Man, Tik Tok, and Wizard of Oz and they set out to rescue their friends. Will the magic powers of Glinda and the Wizard combined be enough to free Ozma and Dorothy?A rousing tale of suspense, magic, and adventure, Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth and final Oz book by L. Frank Baum. It’s a grand conclusion to his chronicles of America’s favorite fairyland. This deluxe gift edition features all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill’s beautiful color plates, along with his nearly one hundred black and white pictures, making it a perfect gift for all Oz fans, new and old.

Queer Visitors from the Marvelous Land of Oz

The Complete Comic Book Saga 1904 1905. This presents a long hidden treasure from the Land of Oz. In 1904 Baum, wrote a story specifically for the Sunday color comic sections. These pages, illustrated by comic pioneer McDougall, ran for 36 weeks and feature some of the most innovative comic strip layouts of the era. In addition, the book features all 13 episodes of a second 1904 05 Oz Sunday feature, Scarecrow and Tinman, by famed Oz illustrator Denslow. This sumptuous volume also includes never reprinted Denslow comics from 1901 03, such as Billy Bounce the first superhero of the comics as well as beautiful comic features from McDougall and Oz illustrator John R. Neill. A high quality production, full of rarely seen comic gems in their original size and colors.

Little Wizard Stories of Oz

After ending the series in 1910, L. Frank Baum returned to Oz with these six stories of Dorothy and Toto, the Cowardly Lion, and other beloved characters. Written for slightly younger readers, these tales offer a fine introduction to Baum’s imaginative world. This facsimile edition features the original blue type and more than 40 full color illustrations.

The Marvelous Land of Oz (By:Eric Shanower)

‘The Marvelous Land of Oz, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz, published on July 5, 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baum’s books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. It is the only book in the series in which Dorothy Gale does not appear. This and the next 34 Oz books of the famous forty were illustrated by John R. Neill.’ Quote from wikipedia. org

About the Author

‘Lyman Frank Baum May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919 was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works 55 novels in total, 82 short stories, over 200 poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen.

Baum was born in Chittenango, New York, into a devout Methodist family of German father’s side and Scots-Irish mother’s side origin, the fifth of six children born to Cynthia Stanton and Benjamin Ward Baum, only three of whom survived into adulthood. He was named ‘Lyman’ after his father’s brother, but always disliked this name, and preferred to go by his middle name, ‘Frank’. His mother, Cynthia Stanton, was a direct descendant of Thomas Stanton, one of the four Founders of what is now Stonington, Connecticut.’ Quote from wikipedia. org

Table of Contents

Publisher’s Preface; Author’s Note; Tip Manufactures A Pumpkinhead; The Marvelous Powder Of Life; The Flight Of The Fugitives; Tip Makes An Experiment In Magic; The Awakening Of The Saw-horse; Jack Pumpkinhead’s Ride To The Emerald City; His Majesty

Oz: The Marvelous Land of Oz (With: Eric Shanower)

‘The Marvelous Land of Oz, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz, published on July 5, 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baum’s books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. It is the only book in the series in which Dorothy Gale does not appear. This and the next 34 Oz books of the famous forty were illustrated by John R. Neill.’ Quote from wikipedia. org

About the Author

‘Lyman Frank Baum May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919 was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works 55 novels in total, 82 short stories, over 200 poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen.

Baum was born in Chittenango, New York, into a devout Methodist family of German father’s side and Scots-Irish mother’s side origin, the fifth of six children born to Cynthia Stanton and Benjamin Ward Baum, only three of whom survived into adulthood. He was named ‘Lyman’ after his father’s brother, but always disliked this name, and preferred to go by his middle name, ‘Frank’. His mother, Cynthia Stanton, was a direct descendant of Thomas Stanton, one of the four Founders of what is now Stonington, Connecticut.’ Quote from wikipedia. org

Table of Contents

Publisher’s Preface; Author’s Note; Tip Manufactures A Pumpkinhead; The Marvelous Powder Of Life; The Flight Of The Fugitives; Tip Makes An Experiment In Magic; The Awakening Of The Saw-horse; Jack Pumpkinhead’s Ride To The Emerald City; His Majesty

The Emerald City of Oz (By:Eric Shanower)

Fantasy lovers of all ages will rejoice at this chance to travel once again to the marvelous land of Oz!A California earthquake sends Dorothy Gale and her new friends Zeb the farm boy, Jim the cab horse, and Eureka the mischievous kitten tumbling through a crack in the ground. Deep beneath the earth, Dorothy is reunited with her old friend the Wizard of Oz and his troupe of nine tiny piglets. Together, Dorothy, the Wizard, and their friends travel through many fantastic lands, where they encounter the Mangaboos, people growing like vegetables in the ground; cross the Valley of Voe, where dama fruit has turned everyone invisible; and are captured by mysterious flying Gargoyles. At last, the intrepid travelers reach Oz, where they have many unforgettable encounters with such favorites as the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger, Princess Ozma and the wooden Sawhorse. Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz was the fourth Oz adventure. First published in 1908, it has captured the imaginations of young readers and listeners for four generations. Now a new generation can discover these superb adventures for themselves. This deluxe gift edition faithfully reproduces the rare first edition, including all sixteen color plates and all fifty black and white illustrations by John R. Neill, as well as the original colorful endpapers. Afterword by Peter Glassman. A deluxe facsimile of the fourth Oz adventure originally published in 1908 when Dorothy and the Wizard meet the Mangaboos. A Books of WonderR Classic.

Aunt Jane’s Nieces

Purchase one of 1st World Library’s Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www. 1stWorldLibrary. ORG Professor De Graf was sorting the mail at the breakfast table. ‘Here’s a letter for you, Beth,’ said he, and tossed it across the cloth to where his daughter sat. The girl raised her eyebrows, expressing surprise. It was some thing unusual for her to receive a letter. She picked up the square envelope between a finger and thumb and carefully read the inscription, ‘Miss Elizabeth De Graf, Cloverton, Ohio.’ Turning the envelope she found on the reverse flap a curious armorial emblem, with the word ‘Elmhurst.’ Then she glanced at her father, her eyes big and somewhat startled in expression. The Professor was deeply engrossed in a letter from Benjamin Lowenstein which declared that a certain note must be paid at maturity. His weak, watery blue eyes stared rather blankly from behind the gold rimmed spectacles. His flat nostrils extended and compressed like those of a frightened horse; and the indecisive mouth was tremulous. At the best the Professor was not an imposing personage. He wore a dressing gown of soiled quilted silk and linen not too immaculate; but his little sandy moustache and the goatee that decorated his receding chin were both carefully waxed into sharp points an indication that he possessed at least one vanity.

Aunt Jane’s Nieces Abroad

PREFATORY: The author is pleased to be able to present a sequel to ‘Aunt Jane’s Nieces,’ the book which was received with so much favor last year. Yet it is not necessary one should have read the first book to fully understand the present volume, the characters being taken to entirely new scenes. The various foreign localities are accurately described, so that those who have visited them will recognize them at once, while those who have not been so fortunate may acquire a clear conception of them. It was my good fortune to be an eye witness of the recent great eruption of Vesuvius. Lest I be accused of undue sensationalism in relating the somewhat dramatic Sicilian incident, I will assure my reader that the story does not exaggerate present conditions in various parts of the island. In fact, Il Duca and Tato are drawn from life, although they did not have their mountain lair so near to Taormina as I have ventured to locate it. Except that I have adapted their clever system of brigandage to the exigencies of this story, their history is truly related. Many who have travelled somewhat outside the beaten tracks in Sicily will frankly vouch for this statement. Italy is doing its best to suppress the Mafia and to eliminate brigandage from the beautiful islands it controls, but so few of the inhabitants are Italians or in sympathy with the government that the work of reformation is necessarily slow. Americans, especially, must exercise caution in travelling in any part of Sicily; yet with proper care not to tempt the irresponsible natives, they are as safe in Sicily as they are at home. Aunt Jane’s nieces are shown to be as frankly adventurous as the average clear headed American girl, but their experiences amid the environments of an ancient and still primitive civilization are in no wise extraordinary. Edith Van Dyne. an excerpt from CHAPTER I THE DOYLES ARE ASTONISHED It was Sunday afternoon in Miss Patricia Doyle’s pretty flat at 3708 Willing Square. In the small drawing room Patricia or Patsy, as she preferred to be called was seated at the piano softly playing the one ‘piece’ the music teacher had succeeded in drilling into her flighty head by virtue of much patience and perseverance. In a thick cushioned morris chair reclined the motionless form of Uncle John, a chubby little man in a gray suit, whose features were temporarily eclipsed by the newspaper that was spread carefully over them. Occasionally a gasp or a snore from beneath the paper suggested that the little man was ‘snoozing’ as he sometimes gravely called it, instead of listening to the music. Major Doyle sat opposite, stiffly erect, with his admiring eyes full upon Patsy. At times he drummed upon the arms of his chair in unison with the music, nodding his grizzled head to mark the time as well as to emphasize his evident approbation. Patsy had played this same piece from start to finish seven times since dinner, because it was the only one she knew; but the Major could have listened to it seven hundred times without the flicker of an eyelash. It was not that he admired so much the ‘piece’ the girl was playing as the girl who was playing the ‘piece.’ His pride in Patsy was unbounded. That she should have succeeded at all in mastering that imposing looking instrument making it actually ‘play chunes’ was surely a thing to wonder at. But then, Patsy could do anything, if she but tried. Suddenly Uncle John gave a dreadful snort and sat bolt upright, gazing at his companions with a startled look that melted into one of benign complacency as he observed his surroundings and realized where he was. The interruption gave Patsy an opportunity to stop playing the tune. She swung around on the stool and looked with amusement at her newly awakened uncle. ‘You’ve been asleep,’ she said.

Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Millville

Purchase one of 1st World Library’s Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www. 1stWorldLibrary. ORG How did I happen to own a farm? asked Uncle John, interrupting his soup long enough to fix an inquiring glance upon Major Doyle, who sat opposite. ‘By virtue of circumstance, my dear sir,’ replied the Major, composedly. ‘It’s a part of my duty, in attending to those affairs you won’t look afther yourself, to lend certain sums of your money to needy and ambitious young men who want a start in life.’ ‘Oh, Uncle! Do you do that?’ exclaimed Miss Patricia Doyle, who sat between her uncle and father and kept an active eye upon both. ‘So the Major says,’ answered Uncle John, dryly. ‘And it’s true,’ asserted the other. ‘He’s assisted three or four score young men to start in business in the last year, to my certain knowledge, by lending them sums ranging from one to three thousand dollars. And it’s the most wasteful and extravagant charity I ever heard of.’

Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Work

Aunt Jane’s Nieces is the title of a juvenile novel first published in 1906, written by L. Frank Baum under the pseudonym Edith Van Dyne. Since the book was the first in a series of novels designed for adolescent girls, its title was applied to the entire series of ten books, published between 1906 and 1918. The book and the series were designed to appeal to the same audience as Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and Little Men. This was expressly stipulated in Baum’s contract with his publishers. The ten titles are: Aunt Jane’s Nieces 1906, Aunt Jane’s Nieces Abroad 1907, Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Millville 1908, Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Work 1909, Aunt Jane’s Nieces in Society 1910, Aunt Jane’s Nieces and Uncle John 1911, Aunt Jane’s Nieces on Vacation 1912, Aunt Jane’s Nieces on the Ranch 1913, Aunt Jane’s Nieces Out West 1914 and Aunt Jane’s Nieces in the Red Cross 1915.

Aunt Jane’s Nieces In Society

Purchase one of 1st World Library’s Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www. 1stWorldLibrary. ORG The gentleman at whom this assertion was flung in a rather angry tone did not answer his sister in law. He sat gazing reflectively at the pattern in the rug and seemed neither startled nor annoyed. Mrs. Merrick, a pink cheeked middle aged lady attired in an elaborate morning gown, knitted her brows severely as she regarded the chubby little man opposite; then, suddenly remembering that the wrinkles might leave their dreadful mark on her carefully rolled and massaged features, she banished them with a pass of her ringed hand and sighed dismally.

Aunt Jane’s Nieces and Uncle John

Aunt Jane’s Nieces is the title of a juvenile novel first published in 1906, written by L. Frank Baum under the pseudonym Edith Van Dyne. Since the book was the first in a series of novels designed for adolescent girls, its title was applied to the entire series of ten books, published between 1906 and 1918. The book and the series were designed to appeal to the same audience as Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and Little Men. This was expressly stipulated in Baum’s contract with his publishers. The ten titles are: Aunt Jane’s Nieces 1906, Aunt Jane’s Nieces Abroad 1907, Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Millville 1908, Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Work 1909, Aunt Jane’s Nieces in Society 1910, Aunt Jane’s Nieces and Uncle John 1911, Aunt Jane’s Nieces on Vacation 1912, Aunt Jane’s Nieces on the Ranch 1913, Aunt Jane’s Nieces Out West 1914 and Aunt Jane’s Nieces in the Red Cross 1915.

Aunt Jane’s Nieces on Vacation

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER IV THE WAY INTO PRINT Sam Cotting’s General Store at Millville divided importance with Bob West’s hardware store but was a more popular loafing place for the sparse population of the tiny town. The post office was located in one corner and the telephone booth in another, and this latter institution was regarded with much awe by the simple natives. Once in awhile some one would telephone over to the Junction on some trivial business, but the longdistance call was never employed except by the ‘ nabobs ‘ the local name for John Merrick and his nieces or by the manager of the new mill at Royal, who had extended the line to his own office in the heart of the pine forest. So, when Uncle John and the girls entered Cotting’s store and the little gentleman shut himself up in the telephone booth, a ripple of excitement spread throughout the neighborhood. Skim Clark, the youthful hope of the Widow Clark, who ‘ run the Emporium,’ happened to be in the store and he rushed out to spread the news that ‘ the nabob’s talkin’ to New Yoruk! ‘ This information demanded immediate attention. Marshall McMahon McNutt, familiarly known as ‘ Peggy ‘ McNutt because he had once lost a foot in a mowing machine and who was alleged to lie a real estate agent, horse doctor, fancy poultry breeder and palmist, and who also dabbled in the sale of subscription books, life insurance, liniment and watermelons, quickly slid off his front porch across the way and sauntered into Cotting’s to participate in the excitement. Seth Davis, the blacksmith, dropped his tools and hurried to the store, and the druggist three doors away a dapper gentleman known as Nib Cork ins hurriedly locked his door and attended the meeting. Presently the curious group was enlarged by the addition of Nick Thorne t…

Aunt Jane’s Nieces Out West

Frank Baum was a famous author of children’s books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Oz. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. He used the pen name Edith van Dyke when writing books for adolescent girls. Aunt Jane s Nieces is a series of ten books written for teen age girls. Jane Merrick is a childless woman with three nieces. She asks the girls to visit her so she can decide how to distribute her inheritance when she dies. Louise, seventeen years old, is a would be society girl, on the look out for a rich husband; she and her mother have decided to spend their limited funds on a three year quest for an acceptable candidate. Beth, fifteen, is a brooding small town beauty, given to dark moods; the sixteen year old Patsy is a temperamental redhead who resents Aunt Jane’s past neglect of her family and determines to have nothing to do with the old woman’s money. The rest of the novels in the series feature travel, adventures, accidents, a kidnapping and rescue, romances, and a marriage for Louise. In Aunt Jane’s Nieces Out West Beth and Patsy are staying in Hollywood after parting from their cousin’s California ranch in the previous novel. They accidentally find themselves on the set of a film depicting a collapsing building. Beth is horrified that they have become unwitting extras in a motion picture,

Aunt Jane’s Nieces in the Red Cross

Aunt Jane’s Nieces is the title of a juvenile novel first published in 1906, written by L. Frank Baum under the pseudonym Edith Van Dyne. Since the book was the first in a series of novels designed for adolescent girls, its title was applied to the entire series of ten books, published between 1906 and 1918. The book and the series were designed to appeal to the same audience as Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and Little Men. This was expressly stipulated in Baum’s contract with his publishers. The ten titles are: Aunt Jane’s Nieces 1906, Aunt Jane’s Nieces Abroad 1907, Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Millville 1908, Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Work 1909, Aunt Jane’s Nieces in Society 1910, Aunt Jane’s Nieces and Uncle John 1911, Aunt Jane’s Nieces on Vacation 1912, Aunt Jane’s Nieces on the Ranch 1913, Aunt Jane’s Nieces Out West 1914 and Aunt Jane’s Nieces in the Red Cross 1915.

The Boy Fortune Hunters in Panama

Sam Steele discovers the location of a lost tribe deep in the heart of Panama where diamonds litter the earth! A secret map found among a dead man’s belongings points the way. But to get there Sam will need to maneuver through mountains, marshes, and mayhem. Luckily, Sam s partner is the unpredictable inventor Duncan Moit. Moit s latest invention, the Amazing Bubble Car, can travel over land and water and is impenetrable to almost any attack! But obstacles abound cultures in collision, the Indian chief s beautiful daughter, and a mysterious dwarf s golden hoard. So come join Sam and his friends on a dangerous journey to riches and adventure in their Magic Travelin Machine! This book was originally published in 1907 under Baum’s pseudonym, Captain Hugh Fitzgerald as Sam Steele’s Adventures in Panama. It was reprinted and retitled the following year as The Boy Fortune Hunters in Panama under Baum’s penname Floyd Akers. It has also been an exceedingly rare book–until now! Beautifully repackaged and reprinted, our new Pawprint Adventures imprint will make Baum’s adventure series books live again!

The Flying Girl

From the author of The Wizard of Oz comes a high flying adventure featuring intrepid girl aviator Orissa Kane. Like Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz, Orissa is intelligent, self reliant and always persevering. Circumstances force young Orissa Kane into the air in her brother’s innovative new airplane. But a deadly foe is intent on sending her crashing back to earth. Soar to new heights with The Flying Girl as she braves countless dangers to achieve worldwide acclaim. This new edition is beautifully illustrated in black and white by acclaimed cartoonist and Oz illustrator Eric Shanower. The book also contains all of the original halftone plates by Joseph Pierre Nuyttens.

A Kidnapped Santa Claus

First published in 1904, ‘A Kidnapped Santa Claus‘ by L. Frank Baum, the author of The Wizard of Oz, describes the action of some uncommon events in the land of Santa. Not far from the Laughing Valley where Santa and all his magical helpers live, and beyond the Forest of Burzee, there stands a huge mountain that contains the Cave of Demons. Each demon has a specialty: Selfishness, Envy, Hatred, Malice, and Repentance. Because the promise of Santa puts all girls and boys on their best behavior, the demons have hardly any visitors to their caves. In order to remedy their dismal foot traffic, they conspire to kidnap Santa! But oh! even when it looks as if the demons might win, one can never underestimate the power of devoted and magical! friends. Adapted by Alex Robinson, author of several graphic novels, the action and menace of the tale will be enhanced and lightly spoofed. It seems a most appropriate treatment of Baum’s work he was an author who often let his profound and unsettling meanings roil beneath the surface of his otherwise fanciful stories.

Mary Louise

It’s positively cruel! pouted Jennie Allen, one of a group of girls occupying a garden bench in the ample grounds of Miss Stearne’s School for Girls, at Beverly. ‘It’s worse than that; it’s insulting,’ declared Mable Westervelt, her big dark eyes flas

Mary Louise in the Country

Edith Van Dyne was one of the pseudonyms of Lyman Frank Baum 1856 1919, an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 1900, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen. Amongst his other famous works are Mother Goose in Prose 1897, American Fairy Tales 1901, The Master Key: An Electrical Fairy Tale 1901, The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus 1902, The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People 1902, The Enchanted Island of Yew 1903, Sky Island 1912 and Mary Louise 1916.

Mary Louise Solves a Mystery

Lyman Frank Baum 1856 1919 was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 1900, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen. Amongst his other famous works are Mother Goose in Prose 1897, American Fairy Tales 1901, The Master Key: An Electrical Fairy Tale 1901, The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus 1902, The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People 1902, The Enchanted Island of Yew 1903, Sky Island 1912 and Mary Louise 1916.

Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls

Edith Van Dyne was one of the pseudonyms of Lyman Frank Baum 1856 1919, an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 1900, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen. Amongst his other famous works are Mother Goose in Prose 1897, American Fairy Tales 1901, The Master Key: An Electrical Fairy Tale 1901, The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus 1902, The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People 1902, The Enchanted Island of Yew 1903, Sky Island 1912 and Mary Louise 1916.

The Sea Fairies

Mayre Griffiths, nicknamed Trot, or sometimes Tiny Trot, is a little girl who lives on the coast of southern California. Her father is the captain of a sailing schooner, and her constant companion is Cap’n Bill Weedles, a retired sailor with a wooden leg. Cap’n Bill had been Trot’s father’s skipper, and Charlie Griffiths had been his mate, before the accident that took the older man’s leg. Trot and Cap’n Bill spend many of their days roaming the beaches near home, or rowing and sailing along the coast. One day, Trot wishes that she could see a mermaid; her wish is overheard, and granted the next day. The mermaids explain to Trot, and the distressed Cap’n Bill, that they are benevolent fairies; when they offer Trot a chance to pay a visit to their land in mermaid form, Trot is enthusiastic, and Bill is too loyal to let her go off without him.

Sky Island

Trot and Cap’n Bill meet Button Bright near their home on the California coast. The boy has been using his grandfather’s Magic Umbrella to take journeys from his Philadelphia home; it has transported him to his present location. After an explanation of the umbrella’s function, the three new friends decide to take a trip to a nearby island. Trot and the Cap’n call it ‘Sky Island,’ because it looks like it is ‘halfway in the sky’ but the umbrella flies them to another place entirely, a literal Sky Island. The place is divided into two contrasting countries, separated by a Fog Bank. The three travelers land on the blue side of Sky Island, to find it a grim country of Blueskins. They are ruled by a sadistic tyrant, the Boolooroo of the Blues. He amuses himself by splitting his subjects into halves, then joining the disparate halves together to create miserably mixed individuals. This is called ‘patching.’ The Boolooroo threatens to do the same to his human visitors; meanwhile he imprisons the Cap’n and Button Bright, and gives Trot as a slave to his daughters, the Six Snubnosed Princesses named Cerulia, Turquoise, Sapphire, Azure, Cobalt, and Indigo. They plan to use Trot as a human pincushion. The three visitors manage to escape from the Blues; penetrating the Great Fog Bank, they reach the pink or sunrise side of Sky Island. The pink country has chubby cheerful residents, who regard the newcomers as sort of pink, though of a sadly pale shade. Still, the laws of the country demand that visitors be put to death; even the ruler, the sylph like Tourmaline the Poverty Queen, cannot pardon them. Among the fabulously wealthy Pinkies, only the ruler lives in want; Tourmaline has been sentenced to the job, because she is the thinnest member of the populace. In the nick of time, Polychrome arrives to prevent the execution. In the topsy turvy value system of the Pinkies, Trot is selected their queen, since her pale skin makes the disadvantaged girl the least pink person among them. Tourmaline retires to private life, and vast riches. After Cap’n Bill leads an invasion and conquest of the island’s opposite side, Trot becomes ‘Booloorooess’ of the Blues as well; she uses her new power to ‘regulate’ both societies into more sensible forms. The three visitors eventually return home, more than a little relieved to escape from Sky Island. non illustrated

Our Landlady

It is widely known that L. Frank Baum spent several years in South Dakota before moving to Chicago, where he wrote the Oz books that made him famous…
Koupal carefully lays out the complexities and ambiguities of Baum’s thinking by providing us with the full texts of Baum’s columns published weekly in the ‘Aberdeen Saturday Pioneer’ between January 1890 and February 1891, and by adding her own commentary and a glossary to place these writings in context. ‘Entitled ‘Our Landlady‘, the column described in a generally humorous vein the conversations and activities of four fictional characters the landlady and three of her regular boarders and a wide variety of prominent local residents of Aberdeen’ ‘Great Plains Quarterly’; ‘Readers will be grateful to Koupal for this amusing and edifying supplement to our understanding of one of the giants of American popular culture’ ‘Western Historical Quarterly’; ‘Baum’s humor is of the biting kind…
Readers of ‘Our Landlady‘ will find the beginnings of Baum’s wonderful world of humor as well as an informative look at life in a prairie state’ ‘South Dakota History’; ‘Koupal is an admirable editor. It’s hard to see how the work could be improved’ ‘The Baum Bugle’. Nancy Tystad Koupal is a native of Mitchell, South Dakota, and serves as director of the Research and Publishing Program at the South Dakota State Historical Society.

Dot and Tot of Merryland

Her real name is Evangeline Josephine Freeland but she has had the nickname Dot since before she can remember, and never calls herself anything else. Dot has free run of Roselawn, a country estate her father bought in hopes the outdoor life will restore her health. And run freely is exactly what she does, day after day, with ever greater spring to her steps, and with ever greater appetite. One morning, finishing her breakfast and scampering out upon the Lawn, Dot notices a tiny path leading through a high, thick hedge. ‘I’ll explore!’ she says to herself, and scoots herself through…
to behold a tiny vine covered cottage, and, on the path leading to it, a little boy with a broad brimmed straw hat. The boy is the gardener’s son, Tot who proves a wonderful playmate from the start…
and a fine partner in adventures: for the two are swept away on a boat, and find themselves casting up in a strange place they never knew existed Merryland!

The Master Key

WHO KNOWS? These things are quite improbable, to be sure; but are they impossible? Our big world rolls over as smoothly as it did centuries ago, without a squeak to show it needs oiling after all these years of revolution. But times change because men change, and because civilization, like John Brown’s soul, goes ever marching on. The impossibilities of yesterday become the accepted facts of to-day. Here is a fairy tale founded upon the wonders of electricity and written for children of this generation. Yet when my readers shall have become men and women my story may not seem to their children like a fairy tale at all. Perhaps one, perhaps two-perhaps several of the Demon’s devices will be, by that time, in popular use. Who knows?

Table of Contents

Chapter; I Rob’s Workshop; 11 The Demon of Electricity; III The Three Gifts; IV Testing the Instruments; V The Cannibal Island; VI The Buccaneers; VII The Demon Becomes Angry; VIII Rob Acquires New Powers; IX The Second Journey; C ON TENTS; Chapter Page; X How Rob Served a Mighty King 104; XI The Man of Science 126; XII How Rob Saved a Republic 136; XIII Rob Loses His Treasures 146; XIV Turk and Tatar 160; XV A Battle With Monsters 182; XVI Shipwrecked Mariners 192; XVII The Coast of Oregon 206; XVIII A Narrow Escape 2 14; XIX Rob Makes a Resolution 225; XX The Unhappy Fate of the Demon 23O; ILLUSTRATIONS; Page; Rob was surrounded by a group of natives of hideous appearance-Fron t is ft iece; From his workshop ran network of wires throughout the house-Headftiecc i; A quick flash of light almost blinded Rob 6; A curious being looked upon him from a magnificent radiance-Tailftiece 8; Scientific men think the people of Mars have been; trying to signal us-Headftiece 9; I am here to do your bidding, said the Demon; -Tailftiece 17; Men have not yet discovered what the birds know; -Ilea, dft iece 18[l /; us rr a no :vs; These three gifts may amuse you for ths next week; –

The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus

An imaginative work published in 1902, Baum tells the story of Claus, an orphaned human raised by various immortal creatures in an enchanted forest. When he reaches adulthood, Claus is told to live among mortals, and he is disheartened initially by poverty, war, and other negative aspects of humanity. He becomes well known for his kindness to children, and this enthusiasm leads to the invention of the first toys. Claus eventually makes it his life’s mission to bring joy to children, and this unfolds into an entertaining explanation of many Christmas traditions, including stockings, trees, and climbing chimneys. The road is not always smooth, and Claus ultimately must face the result of mortality after a lifetime of generosity. ‘The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus‘ shows the depth of Baum’s understanding of children that explains his monumental success as an author of classic children’s literature.

The Enchanted Island of Yew

Children have delighted in the adventures of Dorothy, Glenda the munchkins and her friends as they visited Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children’s books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. He used the pen name Edith van Dyke when writing books for adolescent girls. The Enchanted Island of Yew: Whereon Prince Marvel Encountered the High Ki of Twi and Other Surprising People is a Wildside fantasy written in 1903. From the book From the fairies some of the men had learned wonderful secrets, and had become magicians and sorcerers, with powers so great that the entire island was reputed to be one of enchantments. Who these men were the common people did not always know; for while some were kings and rulers, others lived quietly hidden away in forests or mountains, and seldom or never showed themselves.

Queen Zixi of Ix

Lyman Frank Baum 1856 1919 was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 1900, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen. Amongst his other famous works are Mother Goose in Prose 1897, American Fairy Tales 1901, The Master Key: An Electrical Fairy Tale 1901, The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus 1902, The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People 1902, The Enchanted Island of Yew 1903, Sky Island 1912 and Mary Louise 1916.

The Fate of a Crown (As:Schuyler Staunton)

This book is a facsimile reprint and may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages.

Annabel (By:)

A brand new ‘Centennial Edition’ of one of L. Frank Baum’s rarest works! Originally published in 1906 this L. Frank Baum novel has been beautifully redesigned. ANNABEL features all of the illustrations from both the rare first and second printings as well as handsome decorations by cartoonist Eric Shanower! Only the hand of fate can determine what will happen as two young people face their destinies in L. Frank Baum’s very first young adult novel ANNABEL. Will it be ‘Rags to Riches’ or ‘Riches to Rags’ when Annabel Williams, a beautiful young heiress, befriends Will Carden, a local vegetable boy from the wrong side of the tracks? The suspense and mystery grow until Will s mushroom business becomes entangled in a plot of industrial espionage! ANNABEL was originally published under L. Frank Baum’s pseudonym, Suzanne Metcalf.

John Dough and the Cherub

From the author of The Wizard of Oz comes a delicious fantasy novel featuring a life size gingerbread man named John Dough. All John Dough has to do is avoid being eaten by a crowd of gingerbread loving characters! The tasty fellow journeys to the Isle of Phreex where he meets a charming child of indeterminate gender. Together they escape the island in an incredible flying machine. But they still have to survive the mischievous Mifkets, a den of hungry Pirates, and many other characters with a passion for gingerbread! Joined by a bouncing rubber bear called Para Bruin they finally reach a marvelous land where they might just find a home! In the style of Baum’s famous Wizard of Oz series, John Dough and the Cherub is available again for the first time in many years. This beautiful reprint includes all of John R. Neill s wonderful illustrations and an informative Foreword by J. L. Bell.

Annabel (By:)

A brand new ‘Centennial Edition’ of one of L. Frank Baum’s rarest works! Originally published in 1906 this L. Frank Baum novel has been beautifully redesigned. ANNABEL features all of the illustrations from both the rare first and second printings as well as handsome decorations by cartoonist Eric Shanower! Only the hand of fate can determine what will happen as two young people face their destinies in L. Frank Baum’s very first young adult novel ANNABEL. Will it be ‘Rags to Riches’ or ‘Riches to Rags’ when Annabel Williams, a beautiful young heiress, befriends Will Carden, a local vegetable boy from the wrong side of the tracks? The suspense and mystery grow until Will s mushroom business becomes entangled in a plot of industrial espionage! ANNABEL was originally published under L. Frank Baum’s pseudonym, Suzanne Metcalf.

Policeman Bluejay / Babes in Birdland (As: Laura Bancroft)

The question is often asked me whether Twinkle and Chubbins were asleep or awake when they encountered these wonderful adventures; and it grieves me to reflect that the modern child has been deprived of fairy tales to such an extent that it does not know — as I did when a girl — that in a fairy story it does not matter whether one is awake or not. You must accept it as you would a fragrant breeze that cools your brow, a draft of sweet water, or the delicious flavor of a strawberry, and be grateful for the pleasure it brings you, without stopping to question too closely its source.

For my part I am glad if my stories serve to while away a pleasant hour before bedtime or keep one contented on a rainy day. In this way they are sure to be useful, and if a little tenderness for the helpless animals and birds is acquired with the amusement, the value of the tales will be doubled.

— The Author

The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People

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An amazing collection of juvenile short stories, involving wizards and a sadistic dragon. It takes us to the enchanted land of Mo where people do not die and animals can speak. Baum has portrayed the fantastic world with such brilliance and vibrant imagery that we can picture it in mind?s eye. Guaranteed to charm young readers and all who are young at heart.

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Mother Goose in Prose

It is hard to imagine a more perfect child’s book than nursery rhyme stories written in prose by the creator of Oz, L. Frank Baum, and illustrated by beloved illustrator, Maxfield Parrish. Such was the original version of Mother Goose in Prose, first published in 1897. The volume begins with an historical overview written by Baum himself, in which he notes that the first use of the name ‘Mother Goose’ was by the great French author of fantasies, Charles Perrault the inventor of Sleeping Beauty, Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella and Puss in Boots. Each tale begins with the nursery rhyme, and then a tale that illustrates the rhyme follows told in Baum’s charming, natural fashion. Mother Goose in Prose is a delight for children of all ages.

A New Wonderland / The Magical Monarch of Mo

It is the nature of children to scorn realities, which crowd into their lives all too quickly with advancing years. Childhood is the time for fables, for dreams, for joy. These stories are not true; they could not be true and be so marvelous. No one is expected to believe them; they were meant to excite laughter and to gladden the heart. Perhaps some of those big, grown up people will poke fun of us at you for reading these nonsense tales of the Magical Monarch, and at me for writing them. Never mind. Many of the big folk are still children even as you and I. We cannot measure a child by a standard of size or age. The big folk who are children will be our comrades; the others we need not consider at all, for they are self exiled from our domain. L. Frank Baum June, 1903

American Fairy Tales

This is the first time, I believe, that a book has been printed containing Fairy Tales that relate mainly to American boys and girls and their adventures with real fairies in the United States and other American countries. If fairies exist at all and no one has yet been able to prove that they do not exist then there is no good reason why they should not inhabit our favored land as well as the forest glades and flowery dales of the older world across the water. For fairies are not peculiar to any one locality, and every race has its own fairy legends. Yet, we must consider that the beautiful and well known tales of Andersen and the Brothers Grimm, as well as those of Hauff, Perault sic , Caballero and Andrew Lang, date many long years ago, and such histories would never do for American Fairy Tales, because our country has no great age to boast of. So I am obliged to offer our wide awake youngsters modern tales about modern fairies, and while my humble efforts must not be compared with the classic stories of my masters, they at least bear the stamp of our own times and depict the progressive fairies of to day. My friends, the children, will find these stories quite as astonishing as if they had been written hundreds of years ago, for ours is the age of astonishing things. They are not too serious in purpose, but aim to amuse and entertain, yet I trust the more thoughtful of my readers will find a wholesome lesson hidden between each extravagant notion and humorous incident. L. Frank Baum

Twinkle and Chubbins: Their Astonishing Adventures in Nature-Fairyland (As: Laura Bancroft)

The Twinkle Tales is a 1905 series by L. Frank Baum, published under the pen name Laura Bancroft. The six stories were issued in separate booklets by Baum’s publisher Reilly & Britton, with illustrations by Maginel Wright Enright. In 1911, the six eight chapter stories were collected as Twinkle and Chubbins: Their Astonishing Adventures in Nature Fairyland. Lyman Frank Baum 1856 1919 was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books ever written in American children’s literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 1900, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works, and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen. Amongst his other famous works are Mother Goose in Prose 1897, American Fairy Tales 1901, The Master Key: An Electrical Fairy Tale 1901, The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus 1902, The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People 1902, The Enchanted Island of Yew 1903, Sky Island 1912 and Mary Louise 1916.

The Enchanted Buffalo

This is a tale of the Royal Tribe of Okolom–those mighty I buffaloes that once dominated all the Western prairies, Seven hundred strong were the Okolom–great, shaggy creatures herding together and defying all enemies. Their range was well known to the Indians, to lesser herds of bisons and to all the wilds that roamed in the open; but none cared to molest or interfere with the Royal Tribe.

Further Reading:
Written by L Frank Baum and available from ADB Publishing
The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus
A Kidnapped Santa Claus
The Enchanted Buffalo – This Book
The Enchanted Island of Yew
The Sea Fairies
The Tiger’s Eye

The Oz Series
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Dorothy And The Wizard In Oz
Glinda Of Oz
Ozma Of Oz
Rinkitink In Oz
The Emerald City Of Oz
The Magic Of Oz
The Patchwork Girl Of Oz
The Road To Oz
The Scarecrow Of Oz
The Tin Woodman Of Oz
Tik-Tok Of Oz

Tales Before Tolkien: The Roots of Modern Fantasy

A superb collection, a splendid and much needed book. Anderson has cleared away the dross and shown us the golden roots of fantasy before it became a genre. Michael Moorcock, author of The Eternal ChampionMany of today’s top names in fantasy acknowledge J.R.R. Tolkien as the author whose work inspired them to create their own epics. But which writers influenced Tolkien himself? In a collection destined to become a classic in its own right, internationally recognized Tolkien expert Douglas A. Anderson, editor of The Annotated Hobbit, has gathered the fiction of the many gifted authors who sparked Tolkien s imagination. Included are Andrew Lang s romantic swashbuckler The Story of Sigurd, which features magic rings and a ferocious dragon; an excerpt from E. A. Wyke Smith s The Marvelous Land of Snergs, about creatures who were precursors to Tolkien s hobbits; and a never before published gem by David Lindsay, author of A Voyage to Arcturus, a novel that Tolkien praised highly both as a thriller and as a work of philosophy, religion, and morality. In stories packed with magical journeys, conflicted heroes, and terrible beasts, this extraordinary volume is one that no fan of fantasy or Tolkien should be without. These tales just might inspire a new generation of creative writers.

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