John C. Wright Books In Order

Golden Age Books In Publication Order

  1. The Golden Age (2002)
  2. The Phoenix Exultant (2003)
  3. The Golden Transcendence (2003)

Everness Books In Publication Order

  1. The Last Guardian of Everness (2004)
  2. Mists of Everness (2005)

Unwithering Realm Books In Publication Order

  1. Somewhither (2015)
  2. Nowhither (2019)

Chronicles of Chaos Books In Publication Order

  1. Orphans of Chaos (2005)
  2. Fugitives of Chaos (2006)
  3. Titans of Chaos (2007)

Null-A Series Books In Publication Order

  1. The World of Null-A (By:A.E. Van Vogt) (1945)
  2. The Pawns / Players Of Null A (By:A.E. Van Vogt) (1948)
  3. Null-A Three (By:A.E. Van Vogt) (1973)
  4. Null-A Continuum (2008)

Count to the Eschaton Sequence Books In Publication Order

  1. Count to a Trillion (2011)
  2. The Hermetic Millennia (2012)
  3. The Judge of Ages (2014)
  4. The Architect of Aeons (2015)
  5. The Vindication of Man (2016)
  6. Count to Infinity (2017)

Awake in the Night Books In Publication Order

  1. Awake in the Night Land (2014)

Moth & Cobweb Books In Publication Order

  1. Swan Knight’s Son (2016)
  2. Feast of the Elfs (2016)
  3. Swan Knight’s Sword (2016)
  4. Daughter of Danger (2017)
  5. City of Corpses (2017)
  6. Tithe to Tartarus (2017)

Superluminary Books In Publication Order

  1. Superluminary (2018)
  2. The Lords of Creation (2018)
  3. The Space Vampires (2018)

Lost on the Last Continent Books In Publication Order

  1. Terrors of Pangaea (2020)
  2. Giants of Pangaea (2020)
  3. Gods of Pangaea (2020)

Standalone Novels In Publication Order

  1. Iron Chamber of Memory (2016)
  2. The Last Straw (2019)
  3. All Men Dream of Earthwomen and Other Aeons (2020)

Short Stories/Novellas In Publication Order

  1. One Bright Star to Guide Them (2014)

The Dying Earth Books In Publication Order

  1. The Dying Earth / Mazirian the Magician (1950)
  2. Cugel’s Saga / Cugel: The Skybreak Spatterlight (1966)
  3. The Eyes of the Overworld / Cugel the Clever (1966)
  4. A Quest for Simbilis (1974)
  5. Morreion (1978)
  6. The Seventeen Virgins (1979)
  7. The Bagful of Dreams (1979)
  8. Rhialto the Marvellous (1984)
  9. The Laughing Magician (2006)
  10. Songs of the Dying Earth: Stories in Honour of Jack Vance (2009)

Anthologies In Publication Order

  1. The Space Opera Renaissance (2006)
  2. Clockwork Phoenix: Tales of Beauty and Strangeness (2008)
  3. Songs of the Dying Earth: Stories in Honour of Jack Vance (2009)
  4. Clockwork Phoenix 3: New Tales of Beauty and Strangeness (2010)

Golden Age Book Covers

Everness Book Covers

Unwithering Realm Book Covers

Chronicles of Chaos Book Covers

Null-A Series Book Covers

Count to the Eschaton Sequence Book Covers

Awake in the Night Book Covers

Moth & Cobweb Book Covers

Superluminary Book Covers

Lost on the Last Continent Book Covers

Standalone Novels Book Covers

Short Stories/Novellas Book Covers

The Dying Earth Book Covers

Anthologies Book Covers

John C. Wright Books Overview

The Golden Age

The Golden Age is Grand Space Opera, a large scale SF adventure novel in the tradition of A. E. Van vogt and Roger Zelazny, with perhaps a bit of Cordwainer Smith enriching the style. It is an astounding story of super science, a thrilling wonder story that recaptures the excitements of SF’s golden age writers. The Golden Age takes place 10,000 years in the future in our solar system, an interplanetary utopian society filled with immortal humans. Within the frame of a traditional tale the one rebel who is unhappy in utopia Wright spins an elaborate plot web filled with suspense and passion. Phaethon, of Radamanthus House, is attending a glorious party at his family mansion to celebrate the thousand year anniversary of the High Transcendence. There he meets first an old man who accuses him of being an impostor and then a being from Neptune who claims to be an old friend. The Neptunian tells him that essential parts of his memory were removed and stored by the very government that Phaethon believes to be wholly honorable. It shakes his faith. He is an exile from himself. And so Phaethon embarks upon a quest across the transformed solar system Jupiter is now a second sun, Mars and Venus terraformed, humanity immortal among humans, intelligent machines, and bizarre life forms that are partly both, to recover his memory, and to learn what crime he planned that warranted such preemptive punishment. His quest is to regain his true identity. The Golden Age is one of the major, ambitious SF novels of the year and the international launch of an important new writer in the genre.

The Phoenix Exultant

And now The Phoenix Exultant, a second epic novel of an heroic quest in a far future world of super science from an important new talent. The Phoenix Exultant is a continuation of the story begun in The Golden Age and, like it, a grand space opera in the tradition of Jack Vance and Roger Zelazny with a touch of Cordwainer Smith style invention. At the conclusion of the first book, Phaethon of Radamanthus House, was left an exile from his life of power and privilege. Now he embarks upon a quest across the transformed solar system Jupiter is a second sun, Mars and Venus terraformed, humanity immortal among humans, intelligent machines, and bizarre life forms, to recover his memory, to regain his place in society and to move that society away from stagnation and toward the stars. And most of all Phaethon’s quest is to regain ownership of the magnificent starship, The Phoenix Exultant, the most wonderful ship ever built, and to fly her to the stars. It is an astounding story of super science, a thrilling wonder story that recaptures the verve of SF’s Golden Age writers The Phoenix Exultant is a suitably grand and stirring fulfillment of the promise shown in The Golden Age and confirms John C. Wright as a major new talent in the field.

The Golden Transcendence

Beginning with The Golden Age, continuing with The Phoenix Exultant and now concluding in The Golden Transcendence, The Golden Age is Grand Space Opera, an SF adventure saga in the tradition of A. E. van Vogt and Roger Zelazny, with perhaps a bit of Cordwainer Smith enriching the style. It is an astounding story of super science, a thrilling wonder story that recaptures the excitements of SF’s golden age writers in the suspenseful and passionate tale of a lone rebel unhappy in utopia. The end of the Millennium is imminent, when all minds, human, posthuman, cybernetic, sophotechnic, will be temporarily merged into one solar system spanning supermind called the Transcendence. This is not only the fulfillment of a thousand years of dreams, it is a day of doom, when the universal mind will pass judgment on all the races of humanity and transhumanity. The mighty ship Phoenix Exultant is at last in the hands of her master; Phaethon the Exile is at her helm. But the terrible truth has been revealed: he is being hunted by the agents from a long lost dead star, the eerie and deadly Lords of the Silent Oecumene, whose super technology plumbs depths even the all knowing Earthmind cannot fathom. Humanity will be helpless during The Golden Transcendence. Phaethon’s enemies plan to use the opportunity to destroy the population of the Inner System, man and machine alike. To do this, they must take control of Phaethon’s beloved starship and turn her unparalleled power to warlike uses. Phaethon’s memories are incomplete but he knows a spy for the Silent Ones is already aboard. And when the all encompassing Mind of The Golden Transcendence wakes who will it condemn? Which future will it chose? Are Phaethon’s dreams of star flight about to revolutionize the Golden Age into an age even more glorious than gold, or will they kindle the first open war fought across the immensity of interstellar space?

The Last Guardian of Everness

The rave reviews for John Wright’s science fiction trilogy, The Golden Age, hail his debut as the most important of the new century. Now, in The Last Guardian of Everness, this exciting and innovative writer proves that his talents extend beyond SF, as he offers us a powerful novel of high fantasy set in the modern age.

Young Galen Waylock is the last watchman of the dream gate beyond which ancient evils wait, hungry for the human world. For a thousand years, Galen’s family stood guard, scorned by a world which dismissed the danger as myth. Now, the minions of Darkness stir in the deep, and the long, long watch is over. Galen’s patient loyalty seems vindicated.

That loyalty is misplaced. The so called Power of Light is hostile to modern ideas of human dignity and liberty. No matter who wins the final war between darkness and light, mankind is doomed either to a benevolent dictatorship or a malevolent one. And so Galen makes a third choice: the sleeping Champions of Light are left to sleep. Galen and his companions take the forbidden fairy weapons themselves. Treason, murder, and disaster follow. The mortals must face the rising Darkness alone.

An ambitious and beautifully written story, The Last Guardian of Everness is an heroic adventure that establishes John Wright as a significant new fantasist. It is just the start of a story that will conclude in the companion volume, Mists of Everness.

Mists of Everness

The Chronicles of Everness continue. Young Galen Waylock is the last watchman of the Dream Gate, beyond which the ancient evils wait, hungry for the human world. For a thousand years, Galen’s family has stood guard, scorned by a world that dismissed the danger as myth. Even Galen’s father deserted their post. Discarding his belief in the other world, he left Castle Everness and the lonely coast of Maine to travel the world as a soldier. But the warning bell has sounded in the dream world, unheeded. Now, the minions of Darkness have stirred in the deep and the long watch is over. An army of mythic monsters has invaded our world, and Galen and his friends have begun to fight them. To join the battle with universal darkness, even his father returns. The forces of light have gathered in Castle Everness, which must stand, or all is lost. John Wright has been called the most important talent of the new century, and received rave reviews for each volume of his debut SF trilogy, The Golden Age. Now, in Mists of Everness he continues the towering fantasy begun in The Last Guardian of Everness, a stirring epic that will inspire readers everywhere.

Orphans of Chaos

John C. Wrights last work was the ambitious fantasy sequence, The Last Guardians of Everness: Already regarded as one of the best science fiction writers of the last decade for his stirring Golden Age trilogy, John C. Wright proves he has the right stuff to write exciting modern day epic fantasy, said The Midwest Book Review. Wrights new fantasy is about five orphans, raised in a strict British boarding school, who discover they are not ordinary human beings. The students at the school do not age, while the world outside does. The teenagers begin to make sinister discoveries about themselves. Amelia is apparently a fourth dimensional being; Victor can control the molecular arrangement of matter around him; Vanity can find secret passageways through solid walls where none had previously been; Colin is a psychic; Quentin is a warlock. Each power comes from a different paradigm or view of the inexplicable universeand they should not be able to co exist. The orphans have been kidnapped from their true parents, robbed of their powers and memories, and raised in ignorance by super beings: pagan gods or fairy queens, Cyclops, sea monsters, witches, or things even stranger than this. The children must experiment with, and learn to control, their strange abilities in order to escape their captors.

Fugitives of Chaos

Wright’s new fantasy, which began with Orphans of Chaos, and continues in Fugitives of Chaos, is a tale about five orphans raised in a strict British boarding school who begin to discover that they may not be human beings. The students at the school do not age, while the world around them does. The orphans have been kidnapped from their true parents, robbed of their powers, and raised in ignorance by super beings no more human than they are: pagan gods or fairy queens, Cyclopes, sea monsters, witches, or things even stranger. The five have made sinister discoveries about themselves. Amelia is apparently a fourth dimensional being; Victor is a synthetic man who can control the molecular arrangement of matter around him; Vanity can find secret passageways through solid walls where none had previously been; Colin is a psychic; Quentin is a warlock. Each power comes from a different paradigm or view of the inexplicable universe: and they should not be able to co exist under the same laws of nature. Why is it that they can?The children must experiment with and learn to control their strange abilities in order to escape their captors. Something very important must be at stake in their imprisonment.

Titans of Chaos

Titans of Chaos completes John Wright’s The Chronicles of Chaos. Launched in Orphans of Chaos a Nebula Award Nominee for best novel in 2006, and a Locus Year’s Best Novel pick for 2005 and continued in Fugitives of Chaos, the trilogy is about five orphans raised in a strict British boarding school who discovered that they are not human.
The students have been kidnapped, robbed of their powers, and raised in ignorance by super beings. The five have made incredible discoveries about themselves. Amelia is apparently a fourth dimensional being; Victor is a synthetic man who can control the molecular arrangement of matter; Vanity can find secret passageways through solid walls; Colin is a psychic; Quentin is a warlock. Each power comes from a different paradigm or view of the universe. They have learned to control their strange abilities and have escaped into our world: now their true battle for survival begins.
The Chronicles of Chaos is situated in the literary territory of J. K. Rowling s Harry Potter books, and Neil Gaiman s American Gods, with some of the flash and dazzle of superhero comics.

The World of Null-A (By:A.E. Van Vogt)

The classic novel of non Aristotelian logic and the coming race of supermenGrandmaster A. E. van Vogt was one of the giants of the 1940s, the Golden Age of classic SF. Of his masterpieces, The World of Null A is his most famous and most influential. It was the first major trade SF hardcover ever, in 1949, and has been in print in various editions ever since. The entire careers of Philip K. Dick, Keith Laumer, Alfred Bester, Charles Harness, and Philip Jose Farmer were created or influenced by The World of Null A, and so it is required reading for anyone who wishes to know the canon of SF classics. It is the year 2650 and Earth has become a world of non Aristotelianism, or Null A. This is the story of Gilbert Gosseyn, who lives in that future world where the Games Machine, made up of twenty five thousand electronic brains, sets the course of people’s lives. Gosseyn isn’t even sure of his own identity, but realizes he has some remarkable abilities and sets out to use them to discover who has made him a pawn in an interstellar plot.

The Pawns / Players Of Null A (By:A.E. Van Vogt)

In this sequel to World of Null A, Gilbert Gosseyn must learn to use both hisbrains and function in various bodies in order to save the universe from Enrothe Red.

Null-A Continuum

Grandmaster A. E. van Vogt was one of the giants of the Golden Age of classic SF, the 1940s. Of his masterpieces, The World of Null A is perhaps most influential. It was the first major trade SF hardcover ever, in 1949, and has been in print ever since. The careers of Philip K. Dick, Keith Laumer, Alfred Bester, Charles Harness, and Philip Jose Farmer were created or influenced by The World of Null A. It is required reading for anyone who wishes to know the canon of SF classics.

And so John C. Wright was inspired to write a sequel to the two novels of Null A the second was The Players of Null A. To do this, he trained himself to write in the pulp style and manner of van Vogt. So return again to the Null A future, in which the superhuman amnesiac with a double brain, Gilbert Gosseyn, must pit his wits once more against the remorseless galactic dictator Enro the Red and the mysterious shadow being known as The Follower, while he is hurled headlong through unimaginable distances in space and in time and through alternate eternities to fend off the death, and complete the rebirth, of the Universe itself!

Count to a Trillion

After the collapse of the world economy, a young boy grows up in what used to be Texas as a tough duellist for hire, the future equivalent of a hired gun. But even after the collapse, there is space travel, and he leaves Earth to have adventures in the really wide open spaces. While humanity, and ArtificialIntelligence grow and change, he is catapulted into the more distant future and becomes a kind of superman.

The Dying Earth / Mazirian the Magician

The stories included in The Dying Earth introduce dozens of seekers of wisdom and beauty, lovely lost women, wizards of every shade of eccentricity with their runic amulets and spells. We meet the melancholy deodands, who feed on human flesh and the twk men, who ride dragonflies and trade information for salt. There are monsters and demons. Each being is morally ambiguous: The evil are charming, the good are dangerous. All are at home in Vance’s lyrically described fantastic landscapes like Embelyon where, The sky was a mesh of vast ripples and cross ripples and these refracted a thousand shafts of colored light, rays which in mid air wove wondrous laces, rainbow nets, in all the jewel hues…
. The dying Earth itself is otherworldly: A dark blue sky, an ancient sun…
. Nothing of Earth was raw or harsh the ground, the trees, the rock ledge protruding from the meadow; all these had been worked upon, smoothed, aged, mellowed. The light from the sun, though dim, was rich and invested every object of the land…
with a sense of lore and ancient recollection. Welcome. The Dying Earth and its sequels comprise one of the most powerful fantasy/science fiction concepts in the history of the genre. They are packed with adventure but also with ideas, and the vision of uncounted human civilizations stacked one atop another like layers in a phyllo pastry thrills even as it induces a sense of awe at…
the fragility and transience of all things, the nobility of humanity s struggle against the certainty of an entropic resolution. Dean Koontz, author of the Odd Thomas novels. He gives you glimpses of entire worlds with just perfectly turned language. If he d been born south of the border, he d be up for a Nobel Prize. Dan Simmons author of The Hyperion Cantos.

Cugel’s Saga / Cugel: The Skybreak Spatterlight

‘Vance sees himself in the tradition of popular fantasy writers, but his classic writing style is also comparagle to Homer’s Odyssey, and Cervante’s Don Quixote. Though the Cugel tales may lack the scope and pathos of the greatest adventure yarns, in the twenty-first century, they may be as close as one gets to the celebration of epic human perseverance.’–editor, Brilliance Audio Cugel’s Saga, published 17 years after Eyes of the Overworld, is the second novel that features the scoundrel and trickster, Cugel. Again, Cugel tests wits with Iucounu and acquires rudimentary powers himself. ‘Cugel the Clever [is a rogue so venal and unscrupulous that that he makes Harry Flashman look like Dudley Do-Right. How could you not love a guy like that?…
. Judging from the number of times that Cugel has come back…
you can’t keep a bad man down.’ -George R.R. Martin, author of A Song of Ice and Fire. ‘Cugel the Clever [is a liar and thief in a doomed world of liars and thieves…
. Probably the least attractive hero it would be possible to find, struggling through a universe like a Hieronymus Bosch painting, a hero only in that nearly everybody else he encounters in that universe is on the make too, and yet the Cugel stories are howlingly funny.’ -Kage Baker, author of Empress of Mars.

The Eyes of the Overworld / Cugel the Clever

The Eyes of the Overworld is the first of Vance’s picaresque novels about the scoundrel Cugel. Here he is sent by a magician he has wronged to a distant unknown country to retrieve magical lenses that reveal the Overworld. Conniving to steal the lenses, he escapes and, goaded by a homesick monster magically attached to his liver, starts to find his way home to Almery. The journey takes him across trackless mountains, wastelands, and seas. Vance s career began when he was in the merchant marine and continued through extended stays in exotic cities. Through cunning and dumb luck, the relentless Cugel survives one catastrophe after another, fighting off bandits, ghosts, and ghouls stealing, lying, and cheating without insight or remorse leaving only wreckage behind. Betrayed and betraying, he joins a cult group on a pilgrimage, crosses the Silver Desert as his comrades die one by one and, escaping the Rat People, obtains a spell that returns him home. There, thanks to incompetence and arrogance he misspeaks the words of a purloined spell and transports himself back to the same dismal place he began his journey.

Rhialto the Marvellous

Rhialto the Marvellous takes up the personal and political conflicts among a conclave of two dozen magicians of Ascolais and Almery in the 21st Aeon. The shocking appearance of the Llorio the Murtha, a powerful female force from an earlier aeon threatens to unbalance nature by ensqualming or feminizing the magicians. This triggers a tremendous struggle for power and the other mages turn against Rhialto. Hoping to reestablish his rightful place, Rhialto travels to other aeons to restore the missing Perciplex which projects the Mostrament, the constitution of the association. In his final adventure, Rhialto must, ultimately, travel to the very ends of time and space to confront an old adversary whom he had wronged and must commit further misdeeds to restore order. Out of this welter of exotic politics, values systems, personal eccentricity, and magic, the figure of Rhialto slowly comes into focus and takes on dimension. He is a vain, apparently superficial man, not ashamed to demonstrate his melancholy to enhance his reputation. But he is courteous, patient, and subtle, even kind. He is self aware and introspective as Cugel never could be the wisest and most sympathetic of all of Vance’s wizards.

Songs of the Dying Earth: Stories in Honour of Jack Vance

Thank You, Mr. Vance, by Dean Koontz. 2009 by Dean Koontz. Preface, by Jack Vance. 2009 by Jack Vance. The True Vintage of Erzuine Thale, by Robert Silverberg. 2009 by Agberg, Ltd. Grolion of Almery, by Matthew Hughes. 2009 by Matt Hughes Company Ltd. The Copsy Door, by Terry Dowling. 2009 by Terry Dowling. Caulk the Witch Chaser, by Liz Williams. 2009 by Liz Williams. Inescapable, by Mike Resnick. 2009 by Mike Resnick. Abrizonde, by Walter Jon Williams. 2009 by Walter Jon Williams. The Traditions of Karzh, by Paula Volsky. 2009 by Paula Volsky. The Final Quest of the Wizard Sarnod, by Jeff VanderMeer. 2009 by Jeff VanderMeer. The Green Bird, by Kage Baker. 2009 by Kage Baker. The Last Golden Thread, by Phyllis Eisenstein. 2009 by Phyllis Eisenstein. An Incident in Uskvesh, by Elizabeth Moon. 2009 by Elizabeth Moon. Sylgarmo’s Proclamation, by Lucius Shepard. 2009 by Lucius Shepard. The Lamentably Comical Tragedy or the Laughably Tragic Comedy of Lival Laqavee, by Tad Williams. 2009 by Tad Williams. Guyal the Curator, by John C. Wright. 2009 by John C. Wright. The Good Magician, by Glen Cook. 2009 by Glen Cook. The Return of the Fire Witch, by Elizabeth Hand. 2009 by Elizabeth Hand. The Collegeum of Mauge, by Byron Tetrick. 2009 by Byron Tetrick. Evillo the Uncunning, by Tanith Lee. 2009 by Tanith Lee. The Guiding Nose of Ulf nt Bander z, by Dan Simmons. 2009 by Dan Simmons. Frogskin Cap, by Howard Waldrop. 2009 by Howard Waldrop. A Night at the Tarn House, by George R. R. Martin. 2009 by George R. R. Martin. An Invocation of Incuriosity, by Neil Gaiman. 2009 by Neil Gaiman.

The Space Opera Renaissance

‘Space opera’, once a derisive term for cheap pulp adventure, has come to mean something more in modern SF: compelling adventure stories told against a broad canvas, and written to the highest level of skill. Indeed, it can be argued that the ‘new space opera’ is one of the defining streams of modern SF. Now, World Fantasy Award winning anthologists David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer have compiled a definitive overview of this subgenre, both as it was in the days of the pulp magazines, and as it has become in 2005. Included are major works from genre progenitors like Jack Williamson and Leigh Brackett, stylish midcentury voices like Cordwainer Smith and Samuel R. Delany, popular favorites like David Drake, Lois McMaster Bujold, and Ursula K. Le Guin, and modern day pioneers such as Iain M. Banks, Steven Baxter, Scott Westerfeld, and Charles Stross.

Clockwork Phoenix: Tales of Beauty and Strangeness

You hold in your hands a cornucopia of modern cutting edge fantasy. The first volume of this extraordinary new annual anthology series of fantastic literature explodes on the scene with works that sidestep expectations in beautiful and unsettling ways, that surprise with their settings and startle with the manner in which they cross genre boundaries, that aren’t afraid to experiment with storytelling techniques, and yet seamlessly blend form with meaningful function. The delectable offerings found within these pages come from some of today’s most distinguished contemporary fantasists and brilliant rising newcomers. Whether it’s a touch of literary erudition, playful whimsy, extravagant style, or mind blowing philosophical speculation and insight, the reader will be led into unfamiliar territory, there to find shock and delight. Introducing CLOCKWORK PHOENIX. ‘Author and editor Allen Mythic has compiled a neatly packaged set of short stories that flow cleverly and seamlessly from one inspiration to another…
. Lush descriptions and exotic imagery startle, engross, chill and electrify the reader, and all 19 stories have a strong and delicious taste of weird.’ Publishers WeeklyIncludes stories by Catherynne M. Valente, David Sandner, John Grant, Cat Rambo, Leah Bobet, Michael J. DeLuca, Laird Barron, Ekaterina Sedia, Cat Sparks, Tanith Lee, Marie Brennan, Jennifer Crow, Vandana Singh, John C. Wright, C.S. MacCath, Joanna Galbraith, Deborah Biancotti and Erin Hoffman.

Clockwork Phoenix 3: New Tales of Beauty and Strangeness

‘Allen’s third volume of extraordinary short stories reaches new heights of rarity and wonder…
Without a wrong note, all the stories in this anthology admirably fulfill Allen’s promise of ‘beauty and strangeness.” Publishers Weekly, Starred Review Story cavorts with style. The result is a cornucopia of modern cutting edge fantasy. The third volume of this extraordinary annual anthology series of fantastic literature dares to surpass the first two, with works that sidestep expectations in beautiful and unsettling ways, that surprise with their settings and startle with the manner in which they cross genre boundaries, that aren’t afraid to experiment with storytelling techniques, and yet seamlessly blend form with meaningful function. The effervescent offerings found within these pages come from some of today’s most distinguished contemporary fantasists and brilliant rising newcomers. Whether it’s a touch of literary erudition, playful whimsy, extravagant style, or mind blowing philosophical speculation and insight, the reader will be led into unfamiliar territory, there to find shock and delight. Presenting Clockwork Phoenix 3. Includes stories by Marie Brennan, Tori Truslow, Georgina Bruce, Michael M. Jones, Gemma Files, Shweta Narayan, Cat Rambo, Nicole Kornher Stace, C.S.E. Cooney, S.J. Hirons, Gregory Frost, Kenneth Schneyer, John C. Wright, John Grant, and Tanith Lee.

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