Jack London Books In Order

Dogs of the Islands Books In Publication Order

  1. Jerry of the Islands (1917)
  2. Michael Brother of Jerry (1917)

Standalone Novels In Publication Order

  1. A Daughter of the Snows (1902)
  2. Burning Daylight (1902)
  3. The Kempton-Wace Letters .. (1903)
  4. The Sea-Wolf (1904)
  5. The Game (1905)
  6. White Fang (1906)
  7. Before Adam (1906)
  8. Martin Eden (1909)
  9. Theft (1910)
  10. The Abysmal Brute (1911)
  11. Adventure (1911)
  12. Hearts of Three (1911)
  13. Smoke Bellew (1912)
  14. The Valley of the Moon (1913)
  15. The Star Rover (1914)
  16. The Mutiny of the Elsinore (1914)
  17. Daughters of the Rich (1915)
  18. The Little Lady of the Big House (1916)
  19. The Assassination Bureau, Ltd. (1963)
  20. The Lodger (2015)

Short Stories/Novellas In Publication Order

  1. The Wisdom Of The Trail (1899)
  2. The Man with the Gash (1900)
  3. The God of His Fathers (1901)
  4. The Cruise of the Dazzler (1902)
  5. The Death of Ligoun (1902)
  6. To Build a Fire (1903)
  7. The Shadow and the Flash (1903)
  8. How I Became a Socialist (1903)
  9. The Marriage of Lit-Lit (1903)
  10. Demetrios Contos (1903)
  11. The Call of the Wild and Typhoon (1903)
  12. What Life Means to Me (1905)
  13. Love of Life (1905)
  14. The Enemy of All the World (1907)
  15. Flush of Gold (1907)
  16. Jack London – The Iron Heel (1908)
  17. The Heathen (1908)
  18. The Taste of the Meat (1910)
  19. The Eternity of Forms (1910)
  20. A Daughter of the Aurora/A Piece of Steak (1911)
  21. The Scarlet Plague (1912)
  22. The Jacket (1914)
  23. At the Rainbow’s End (1914)
  24. When Alice Told Her Soul (1916)
  25. Curious Fragments (1986)
  26. The League of the Old Men (2004)
  27. The Story of Keesh (2008)
  28. The Chinago (2008)
  29. To the Man on the Trail (2008)
  30. A Thousand Deaths (2010)
  31. Bulls (2013)
  32. Confession (2013)
  33. The Red One (2014)
  34. The Men of the Forty Mile (2014)
  35. Hoboes That Pass in the Night (2014)
  36. The Fuzziness of Hoockla-Heen (2014)
  37. The First Poet (2014)
  38. The Hanging of Cultus George (2014)
  39. A Flutter in Eggs (2014)
  40. The King of Mazy May (2014)
  41. Jack London – The Son of the Wolf (2017)
  42. The unparalleled invasion / Une invasion sans précédent / La invasión sin paralelo. Première édition trilingue / First trilingual edition (2017)
  43. The Faith of Men (2017)
  44. Lost Face. (2018)
  45. The Turtle Of Tasman (2019)
  46. Lost Face (2019)
  47. Tales Of Fish Patrol (2019)
  48. The Strength Of Strong (2019)
  49. The Night Born (2019)
  50. The Call of the Wild – (2019)

Non-Fiction Books In Publication Order

  1. The People of the Abyss (1903)
  2. The War of the Classes (1906)
  3. The Cruise of the Snark (1907)
  4. The Road (1907)
  5. Revolution and Other Essays (1909)
  6. John Barleycorn (1913)
  7. Essays of Revolt (1926)
  8. No Mentor But Myself (1978)
  9. Sporting Blood: Selections from Jack London’s Greatest Sports Writing (1981)
  10. Our Hawaii (2015)

Short Story Collections In Publication Order

  1. The Son Of The Wolf (1900)
  2. ‘Dutch Courage’ and Other Stories (1900)
  3. The Faith of Men and Other Stories (1902)
  4. Children of the Frost (1902)
  5. A Daughter of the Aurora (1902)
  6. Amateur Night (1903)
  7. The Call Of The Wild And Selected Stories (1905)
  8. Tales of the Fish Patrol (1905)
  9. Brown Wolf and Other Stories by Jack London, Fiction, Action & Adventure (1906)
  10. A Day’s Lodging (1906)
  11. The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories (1906)
  12. Brown Wolf (1906)
  13. Moon-Face and Other Stories (1906)
  14. The Passing of Marcus O’Brien (1907)
  15. Aloha OE (1908)
  16. To Build a Fire and Other Stories (1908)
  17. The Strength of the Strong (1909)
  18. The Madness of John Harned (1909)
  19. The Benefit of the Doubt (1910)
  20. South Sea Tales (1911)
  21. A Son of the Sun (1912)
  22. The Yukon writings of Jack London (1912)
  23. The House of Pride (1912)
  24. The Night-Born and Other Stories (1913)
  25. In Hawaii with Jack London (1916)
  26. The Turtles of Tasman (1916)
  27. The Human Drift (1917)
  28. On the Makaloa Mat (1919)
  29. The Bones of Kahekili (1919)
  30. The Sun-Dog Trail And Other Stories (1951)
  31. Jack London’s California: The Golden Poppy and Other Writings (1955)
  32. White Fang, and Other Stories (1963)
  33. The Sea-Wolf and Other Stories (1964)
  34. Stories of Hawaii (1965)
  35. The Call of the Wild and Other Stories (1965)
  36. The Science Fiction Stories of Jack London (1975)
  37. The Unabridged Jack London (1981)
  38. Klondike Tales (1982)
  39. The Dream of Debs/Account of the San Francisco Cooks & Waiters Strike (1985)
  40. Tales of Hawaii (1989)
  41. Tales of the Pacific (1989)
  42. The Collected Jack London (1991)
  43. Five Great Short Stories (1992)
  44. Northland Stories (1997)
  45. Fantastic Tales (1998)
  46. The Plays of Jack London (2000)
  47. Jack London in Aloha-Land (2000)
  48. Lost Face And Other Stories (2005)
  49. Stories of Ships and the Sea (2006)
  50. Jack London’s Tales of Cannibals and Headhunters (2006)
  51. The Asian Writings of Jack London (2009)
  52. San Francisco Stories (2010)
  53. Sailing Ships and Other Adventures (2011)
  54. Island Tales… (2012)
  55. The Science Fiction of Jack London (2012)
  56. Uncollected Stories (2013)
  57. When God Laughs and Other Stories (2013)
  58. The Works of Jack London. — (2013)
  59. ‘The Turtles of Tasman’ and Other Stories (2013)
  60. ‘The Red One’ and Other Stories (2013)
  61. ‘The Strength of the Strong’ and Other Stories (2013)
  62. The Curious Fragment (2013)
  63. The Classic Works of Jack London (2014)
  64. The Leopard Man’s Story (2014)
  65. The Complete Poetry of Jack London (2014)
  66. Negore the Coward (2014)
  67. Small-Boat Sailing (2014)
  68. The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, Volume 1 (2015)
  69. The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, Volume 2 (2015)
  70. The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, Volume 3 (2015)
  71. The Poetical Works of Jack London (2015)
  72. Brown Wolf and Other Jack London Stories (2016)
  73. The House of Pride (2016)
  74. Tales of the Klondyke (2016)
  75. Jack London – Moon-Face & Other Stories (2016)
  76. Jack London – The Science Fiction Stories – Volume 2 (2017)
  77. Love Of Life And Other Stories (2019)
  78. Love of Life & Other Stories Illustrated (2019)
  79. Jack London Dog Stories (2019)
  80. Jack London’s Stories for Boys (2020)

Anthologies In Publication Order

  1. The Boy Scouts Book of Campfire Stories (1921)
  2. 50 Great American Short Stories (1963)
  3. The Arctic: an anthology of the finest writing on the Arctic and the Antarctic (2007)
  4. The Most Dangerous Game and Other Stories of Adventure (2011)

Dogs of the Islands Book Covers

Standalone Novels Book Covers

Short Stories/Novellas Book Covers

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Jack London Books Overview

Jerry of the Islands

The story of Irish Terrier that went to sea, written by the author while stretched out on Waikiki Beach. Jack London’s tale of adventure on the South Seas includes a foreword by the author, in which he says, ‘I hope I have given some assurance that the adventures of my dog hero in this novel are real adventures in a very real cannibal world.’

‘Not until Mister Haggin abruptly picked him up under one arm and stepped into the sternsheets of the waiting whaleboat, did Jerry dream that anything untoward was to happen to him. Mister Haggin was Jerry’s beloved master, and had been his beloved master for the six months of Jerry’s life. Jerry did not know Mister Haggin as ‘master,’ for ‘master’ had no place in Jerry’s vocabulary, Jerry being a smooth coated, golden sorrel Irish terrier.’

Jack London 1876 1916, an American novelist and short story writer whose works deal romantically with elemental struggles for survival. At his peak, he was the highest paid and the most popular of all living writers. Because of early financial difficulties, he was largely self educated past grammar school.

London draws heavily on his life experiences in his writing. He spent time in the Klondike during the Gold Rush and at various times was an oyster pirate, a seaman, a sealer, and a hobo. His first work was published in 1898. From there he went on to write such American classics as Call of the Wild, Sea Wolf, and White Fang.

Michael Brother of Jerry

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II DAG DAUGHTRY strolled along the beach, Michael at his heels or running circles of delight around him at every repetition of that strange low lip noise, and paused just outside the circle of lantern light where dusky forms laboured with landing cargo from the whaleboats and where the Commissioner’s clerk and. the Makambo’s supercargo still wrangled over the bill of lading. When Michael would have gone forward, the man withstrained him with the same inarticulate, almost inaudible, kiss. For Daughtry did not care to be seen on such dog stealing enterprise and was planning how to get oa board the steamer unobserved. He edged around outside the lantern shine and went on along the beach to the native village. As he had foreseen, all the able bodied men were down at the boat landing working cargo. The grass houses seemed lifeless, but at last, from one of them, came a challenge in the querulous, high pitched tones of age: ‘What name?’ ‘ Me walk about plenty too much,’ he replied in the beche de mer English of the West South Pacific. ‘ Me belong along steamer. Suppose’m you take’m me along canoe, washee washee, me give’m you fella boy two stick tobacco.’ ‘ Suppose’m you give’m me ten stick, all right along me,’ came the reply. ‘ Me give’m five stick.’ the six quart steward bar gained. ‘ Suppose’m you no like’m five stick then you fella boy go to hell close up.’ There was a silence. ‘ You like’m five stick? ‘ Daughtry insisted of the dark interior. ‘ Me like’m,’ the darkness answered, and through the darkness the body that owned the voice approached with such strange sounds that the steward lighted a match to see. A blear eyed ancient stood before him, balancing on a single crutch. His eyes were half filmed over by a growth of morbid membrane…

A Daughter of the Snows

Purchase one of 1st World Library’s Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. 1st World Library Literary Society is a non profit educational organization. Visit us online at www. 1stWorldLibrary. ORG Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide water dog, strong of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal, and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost. Buck lived at a big house in the sun kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge Miller’s place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half hidden among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was approached by gravelled driveways which wound about through wide spreading lawns and under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables, where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine clad servants’ cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors, green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge Miller’s boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot afternoon.

Burning Daylight

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER VI A Crowd filled the Tivoli the old crowd that had seen Daylight depart two months before; for this was the night of the sixtieth day, and opinion was divided as ever as to whether or not he would compass the achievement. At ten o’clock bets were still being made, though the odds rose, bet by bet, against his success. Down in her heart the Virgin believed he had failed, yet she made a bet of twenty ounces with Charley Bates, against forty ounces, that Daylight would arrive before midnight. She it was who heard the first yelps of the dogs. ‘Listen!’ she cried. ‘It’s Daylight!’ There was a general stampede for the door; but when the double storm doors were thrown wide open, the crowd fell back. They heard the eager whining of dogs, the snap of a dog whip, and the voice of Daylight crying encouragement as the weary animals capped all they had done by dragging the sled in over the wooden floor. They came in with a rush, and with them rushed in the frost, a visible vapor of smoking white, through which their heads and backs showed, as they strained in the harness, till they had all the seeming of swimming in a river. Behind them, at the gee pole, came Daylight, hidden to the knees by the swirling frost through which he appeared to wade. He was the same old Daylight, withal lean and tired looking, and his black eyes were sparkling and flashing brighter than ever. His parka of cotton drill hooded him like a monk, and fell in straight lines to his knees. Grimed and scorched by camp smoke and fire, the garment in itself told the story of his trip. A two months’ beard coveredhis face; and the beard, in turn, was matted with the ice of his breathing through the long seventy mile run. His entry was spectacular, melodramatic; and he knew it. It was his life, and h…

The Kempton-Wace Letters ..

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

The Sea-Wolf

Rocco Fumento and Tony Williams present the final version of Robert Rossen’s screenplay for Jack London’s ‘The Sea Wolf’. Released in 1941, this classic film was directed by Michael Curtiz and starred Edward G. Robinson as Wolf Larsen, John Garfield as George Leach, Ida Lupino as fugitive Ruth Webster, Alexander Knox as writer Humphrey Van Weyden, and Howard da Silva as Harrison. Both the novel and the film feature a hard luck assemblage condemned either by savage coercion or pure evil fortune to sail aboard the ‘Ghost’, a seal harvesting vessel commanded by a power mad tyrant the aptly named Wolf Larsen. Discussing the process of turning literature into film, Fumento and Williams analyze in detail the differences between London’s ‘Sea Wolf’ and Rossen’s screenplay. Re creating the world into which the movie emerged, each editor provides a separate introduction. Fumento analyzes the role of Warner Brothers in determining relevant production and allegorical features of the final film version. Williams describes London’s reasons for writing the original novel in 1903, its appeal for the cinema, the different film versions at least eight that have appeared, and the social and historical context influencing Rossen’s screenplay.

The Game

On the eve of their wedding, twenty year old Jack Fleming arranges a secret ringside seat for his sweetheart to view her only rival: the ‘game.’ Through Genevieve’s apprehensive eyes, we watch the prizefight that pits her fair young lover, ‘the Pride of West Oakland,’ against the savage and brutish John Ponta and that reveals as much about her own nature, and Joe’s, as it does about the force that drives the two men in their violent, fateful encounter. Responding to a review that took him to task for his realism, Jack London wrote, ‘I have had these experiences and it was out of these experiences, plus a fairly intimate knowledge of prize fighting in general, that I wrote The Game.’ With this intimate realism, London took boxing out of the realm of disreputable topics and set it on a respectable literary course that extends from A. J. Liebling to Ernest Hemingway to Joyce Carol Oates. The familiarity of London’s boxing writing testifies to its profound influence on later literary commentators on the sport, while the story The Game tells remains one of the most powerful and evocative portraits ever given of prizefighters in the grip of their passion.

White Fang

Even as a pup, he is different from his brothers: A large gray cub among a litter of red haired puppies, with a quicker bite and heavier paw. When he leaves the protection of his snug cave, he and his mother are captured by the fire making gods man animals who live in teepees, and who determine that the pup is half dog, half wolf, and name him White Fang. White Fang finds himself relentlessly tormented by the tribe’s domestic dogs, and quickly learns to surpass them in cunning and viciousness. His brutality is encouraged even further when he is sold to a sadistic man who takes advantage of the dog’s massive size and tremendous strength to pit him in to the death dog fights. White Fang is driven near mad, until a young man comes along who offers him kindness and friendship. But friendship is something White Fang doesn’t understand…
yet. Jack London’s adventure masterpiece is not only a vivid account of the Klondike gold rush and North American Indian life, it is an intriguing study of the effects of our environments in forming who we are. Caldecott winner Ed Young’s exquisite illustrations bristle with energy in their portrayal of an angry young wolf struggling with the loss of wild independence that is his birthright, but gaining a new freedom through a profound and unconditional love.

Before Adam

Even as a pup, he is different from his brothers: A large gray cub among a litter of red haired puppies, with a quicker bite and heavier paw. When he leaves the protection of his snug cave, he and his mother are captured by the fire making gods man animals who live in teepees, and who determine that the pup is half dog, half wolf, and name him White Fang. White Fang finds himself relentlessly tormented by the tribe’s domestic dogs, and quickly learns to surpass them in cunning and viciousness. His brutality is encouraged even further when he is sold to a sadistic man who takes advantage of the dog’s massive size and tremendous strength to pit him in to the death dog fights. White Fang is driven near mad, until a young man comes along who offers him kindness and friendship. But friendship is something White Fang doesn’t understand…
yet. Jack London’s adventure masterpiece is not only a vivid account of the Klondike gold rush and North American Indian life, it is an intriguing study of the effects of our environments in forming who we are. Caldecott winner Ed Young’s exquisite illustrations bristle with energy in their portrayal of an angry young wolf struggling with the loss of wild independence that is his birthright, but gaining a new freedom through a profound and unconditional love.

Martin Eden

With Frontspiece by the Kinnets. London has lost nothing in power. He has gained in sweetness. There is something brutally strong in Martin Eden. Then there is a gentler background. Someone says Martin is London’s self. Maybe in part. Maybe wholly. Martin Eden is concretely explicit and yet potently symbolistic. Here was a man who undertook to civilize himself and only half succeeded. And here also a woman who undertook to uncivilize herself, only half succeeded. How the spirit grew in Martin, and how the flesh grew in Ruth, will bear looked at frankly from both sides.’…
steadily, forgetful of where he was, his face glowing. Twice he closed the book on his forefinger to look at the name of the author. Swinburne! he would remember that name. That fellow had eyes, and he had certainly seen color and flashing light. But who was Swinburne? Was he dead a hundred years or so, like most of the poets? Or was he alive still, and writing? He turned to the title page…
yes, he had written other books; well, he would go to the free library the first thing in the morning and try to get hold of some of Swinburne’s stuff. He went back to the text and lost himself. He did not notice that a young woman had entered the room. The first he knew was when he heard Arthur’s voice saying: ‘Ruth, this is Mr. Eden.’The book was closed on his forefinger, and before he turned he was thrilling to the first new impression, which was not of the girl, but of her brother’s words. Under that muscled body of his he was a mass of quivering sensibilities. At the slightest impact of the…
‘About the Publisher Forgotten Books is a publisher of historical writings, such as: Philosophy, Classics, Science, Religion, History, Folklore and Mythology. Forgotten Books’ Classic Reprin

Theft

This scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series. In the interest of creating a more extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark backgrounds and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as a part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world’s literature.

The Abysmal Brute

Jack London 1876 1916, was an American author and a pioneer in the then burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books. In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden 1909. Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower cost production of magazines. This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost 1902, The Call of the Wild 1903, The Sea Wolf 1904, The Game 1905, White Fang 1906, The Road 1907, Before Adam 1907, Adventure 1911, and The Scarlet Plague 1912.

Hearts of Three

Francis Morgan, a wealthy heir of industrialist and Wall Street maven Richard Henry Morgan, is a jaded young New Yorker. When his father’s business partner Thomas Regan suggests that Francis take a holiday in Central America, ostensibly to search for the treasure of the Morgans’ legendary ancestor, Francis thinks it’s a splendid idea. But he never suspects what adventures await across the border a surprising meeting with a distant relative, imprisonment on a murder charge, a daring escape, a perilous journey through the Cordilleras following an ancient Mayan prophecy, the Valley of Lost Souls with its mystic queen, fantastical treasures and, of course, the love of a beautiful stranger. Meanwhile, back in New York, a cunning enemy is positioning himself to destroy the Morgan fortune. Francis must get back in time to thwart the takeover and save his family’s business.

Smoke Bellew

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Ill THE STAMPEDE TO SQUAW CREEK TWO months after Smoke Bellew and Shorty went after moose for a grub stake, they were back in the Elkhorn saloon at Dawson. The hunting was done, the meat hauled in and sold for two dollars and a half a pound, and between them they possessed three thousand dollars in gold dust and a good team of dogs. They had played in luck. Despite the fact that the gold rush had driven the game a hundred miles or more into the mountains, they had within half that distance bagged four moose in a narrow canyon. The mystery of the strayed animals was no greater than the luck of their killers, for within the day four famished Indian families, reporting no game in three days’ journey back, camped beside them. Meat was traded for starving dogs, and after a week of feeding Smoke and Shorty harnessed the animals and began freighting the meat to the eager Dawson market. The problem of the two men now was to turn their gold dust into food. The current price for flour and beans was a dollar and a half a pound, but the difficulty was to find a seller. Dawson was in the throes of famine. Hundreds of men, with money but no food, had been compelled to leave the country. Manyhad gone down the river on the last water, and many more, with barely enough food to last, had walked the six hundred miles over the ice to Dyea. Smoke met Shorty in the warm saloon, and found the latter jubilant. ‘ Life ain’t no punkins without whiskey an’ sweet enin’,’ was Shorty’s greeting, as he pulled lumps of ice from his thawing mustache and flung them rattling onto the floor. ‘ An’ I sure just got eighteen pounds of that same sweetenin’. The geezer only charged three dollars a pound for it. What luck did you have?’ ‘ I, too, have not been idle,’ Smoke answered with pride. ‘ I bo…

The Valley of the Moon

Billy and Saxon Roberts are hard working people living in Oakland. When a issue erupts between the San Francisco bricklayers and the Oakland bricklayers, it leads to a riot that pulls both Billy and Saxon into the frantic fray. When the commotion settles down, Billy and Saxon realize that the growing labor unrest will only get worse and decide to find a safer place to live. They eventually find it in The Valley of the Moon.

Jack London was an adventurer and writer during the early 20th century. He wrote such classical works as Call of the Wild and White Fang, both of which were inspired by his year in Alaska as a gold prospector. Valley of the Moon is where Jack London eventually settled to raise record crops and champion livestock.

The Star Rover

Novelist and short story writer Jack London 1876 1916 contemplated the strange theory of astral travel, penning ‘The Star Rover‘ in 1914. The last of London’s fifty books, which include ‘White Fang’ and ‘The Call of the Wild’, ‘The Star Rover‘ centres on San Quentin prison inmate Darrell Standing, a former university professor who is serving a life sentence for murdering a colleague. To escape the tortures of his confinement, he withdraws into dreams of past lives in which he experiences what he calls his ‘eternal recurrence on earth.’ Thus the fantastic becomes a vehicle for exposing the social injustices of the U.S. prison system. One of America’s great turn of the century writers, London lived as a sailor, waterfront loafer, and hobo, embarking on a successful literary career based on his travels, observations of nature, and his outspoken position in the Socialist Party. Internationally recognised literary critic and essayist Leslie Fiedler, the former Samuel Clemens Professor at SUNY Buffalo, provides an insightful introduction to this lost classic.

The Mutiny of the Elsinore

In the Phaedrus, the Republic, the Philebus, the Parmenides, and the Sophist, we may observe the tendency of Plato to combine two or more subjects or different aspects of the same subject in a single dialogue. In the Sophist and Statesman especially we note that the discussion is partly regarded as an illustration of method, and that analogies are brought from afar which throw light on the main subject. And in his later writings generally we further remark a decline of style, and of dramatic power; the characters excite little or no interest, and the digressions are apt to overlay the main thesis; there is not the ‘callida junctura’ of an artistic whole. Both the serious discussions and the jests are sometimes out of place. The invincible Socrates is withdrawn from view; and new foes begin to appear under old names. Plato is now chiefly concerned, not with the original Sophist, but with the sophistry of the schools of philosophy, which are making reasoning impossible; and is driven by them out of the regions of transcendental speculation back into the path of common sense. A logical or psychological phase takes the place of the doctrine of Ideas in his mind. He is constantly dwelling on the importance of regular classification, and of not putting words in the place of things. He has banished the poets, and is beginning to use a technical language. He is bitter and satirical, and seems to be sadly conscious of the realities of human life.

The Little Lady of the Big House

From the first the voyage was going wrong. Routed out of my hotel on a bitter March morning, I had crossed Baltimore and reached the pier end precisely on time. At nine o’clock the tug was to have taken me down the bay and put me on board the Elsinore, and with growing irritation I sat frozen inside my taxicab and waited. On the seat, outside, the driver and Wada sat hunched in a temperature perhaps half a degree colder than mine. And there was no tug. Possum, the fox terrier puppy Galbraith had so inconsi derately foisted upon me, whimpered and shivered on my lap inside my greatcoat and under the fur robe. But he would not settle down. Continually he whimpered and clawed and struggled to get out. And, once out and bitten by the cold, with equal insistence he whimpered and clawed to get back. His unceasing plaint and movement was anything but sedative to my jangled nerves. In the first place I was uninterested in the brute. He meant nothing to me. I did not know him. Time and again, as I drearily waited, I was on the verge of giving him to the driver. Once, when two little girls evidently the wharfinger’s daughters went by, my hand reached out to the door to open it so that I might call to them and present them with the puling little wretch.

The Assassination Bureau, Ltd.

The Assasssination Bureau kills people for cash, but it also has a social conscience. The leader of the Bureaujustifies these murders as to the social good until he accepts a contract on himself. Truly in Jack London fashionnit is not to be outdone even in these modern days enough said. A Collector’s Edition.

The Wisdom Of The Trail

The Wisdom Of The Trail is a book written by Jack London. It is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great novel will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, The Wisdom Of The Trail is required reading for various courses and curriculums. And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Jack London is highly recommended. Published by Quill Pen Classics and beautifully produced, The Wisdom Of The Trail would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone’s personal library.

The God of His Fathers

On every hand stretched the forest primeval, the home of noisy comedy and silent tragedy. Here the struggle for survival continued to wage with all its ancient brutality. Briton and Russian were still to overlap in the Land of the Rainbow’s End and this was the very heart of it nor had Yankee gold yet purchased its vast domain. The wolf pack still clung to the flank of the cariboo herd, singling out the weak and the big with calf, and pulling them down as remorselessly as were it a thousand, thousand generations into the past. The sparse aborigines still acknowledged the rule of their chiefs and medicine men, drove out bad spirits, burned their witches, fought their neighbors, and ate their enemies with a relish which spoke well of their bellies. But it was at the moment when the stone age was drawing to a close. Already, over unknown trails and chartless wildernesses, were the harbingers of the steel arriving, fair faced, blue eyed, indomitable men, incarnations of the unrest of their race. By accident or design, single handed and in twos and threes, they came from no one knew whither, and fought, or died, or passed on, no one knew whence. The priests raged against them, the chiefs called forth their fighting men, and stone clashed with steel; but to little purpose.

The Cruise of the Dazzler

Only that very morning he had been a school boy, and now he was a sailor, shipped on the _Dazzler_ and bound he knew not whither. His fifteen years increased to twenty at the thought of it, and he felt every inch a man a sailorman at that. He wished Charley and Fred could see him now. Well, they would hear of it soon enough. He could see them talking it over, and the other boys crowding around. ‘Who?’ ‘Oh, Joe Bronson; he’s gone to sea. Used to chum with us.’ Joe pictured the scene proudly. Then he softened at the thought of his mother worrying, but hardened again at the recollection of his father. Not that his father was not good and kind; but he did not understand boys, Joe thought. That was where the trouble lay. Only that morning he had said that the world wasn’t a play ground, and that the boys who thought it was were liable to make sore mistakes and be glad to get home again. Well, _he_ knew that there was plenty of hard work and rough experience in the world; but _he_ also thought boys had some rights. He’d show him he could take care of himself; and, anyway, he could write home after he got settled down to his new life.

To Build a Fire

To Build a Fire is one of Jack London’s most beloved short stories. A heartbreaking tale set in the vast wintry landscape of the North, it endures as one of the greatest adventures ever written.

The Shadow and the Flash

This surprising sci fi tale by the author of The Call of the Wild demonstrates why Jack London is an undisputed master of the short story. Illustrations by multitalented author/artist Stan Timmons.

How I Became a Socialist

THIS 20 PAGE ARTICLE WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE BOOK: War of the Classes, by Jack London. To purchase the entire book, please order ISBN 1417906839.

Love of Life

Jack London is internationally acclaimed as one of the world’s greatest outdoor adventure writer of all time. His most popular work is the novel, The Call of the Wild, but Jack London s short stories also capture the same spirit and high level of talent that are so apparent in his writing style, and in his craft at storytelling. In the story, To Build a Fire, listen to what happens to a man and his dog in seventy below zero weather in a land barren of any life but the snow and ice. Follow the life of a patient living in a mental hospital in Told in the Drooling Ward, and meet a colorful cast of characters along the way. Other stories include: A Piece of Steak, The Chinago, and The Shadow and the Flash. With a total of 22 short stories, and a cast of different readers for each story, this 8 cassette audio collection is custom made for high quality entertainment, and specifically compiled with the best short stories from Jack London s repertoire. Guaranteed to be a fun and exciting audio experience, this magnificent 8 cassette collection is a perfect travel companion on the road, and can also be listened to in the home, while exercising, and anywhere you prefer to listen! Dive into Jack London s world of adventure, survival, and intrigue. The experiences are just about to begin! 22 Short Stories on 8 Cassettes including: To Build A Fire The Chinago Told in the Drooling Ward The Leopard Man’s Story A Piece of Steak That Spot The Man With the Gash Amateur Night Under The Deck Awnings To Kill A Man Too Much Gold Winged Blackmail Created He Them When The World Was Young The Unexpected The House of Pride The White Silence A Wicked Woman The Shadow and the Flash War Which Make Men Remember

The Scarlet Plague

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Ill THE old man wiped the tears away on his grimy knuckles and took up the tale in a tremulous, piping voice that soon strengthened as he got the swing of the narrative. ‘It was in the summer of 2013 that the Plague came. I was twenty seven years old, and well do I remember it. Wireless despatches ‘ Hare Lip spat loudly his disgust, and Granser hastened to make amends. ‘We talked through the air in those days, thousands and thousands of miles. And the word came of a strange disease that had broken out in New York. There were seventeen millions of people living then in that noblest city of America. Nobody thought anything about the news. It was only a small thing. There had been only a few deaths. It seemed, though, that they had died very quickly, and that one of the first signs of the disease was the turning red of the face and all the body. Within twenty four hours came the report of the first case in Chicago. And on the same day, it was made public that London, the greatest city in the world, next to Chicago, had been secretly fighting the plague for two weeks and censoring the news despatches that is, not permitting the word to go forth to the rest of the world that London had the plague. ‘It looked serious, but we in California, like everywhere else, were not alarmed. We were sure that the bacteriologists would find a way to overcome this new germ, just asthey had overcome other germs in the past. But the trouble was the astonishing quickness with which this germ destroyed human beings, and the fact that it inevitably killed any human body it entered. No one ever recovered. There was the old Asiatic cholera, when you might eat dinner with a well man in the evening, and the next morning, if you got up early enough, you would see him being hauled by your windo…

The League of the Old Men

THIS 32 PAGE ARTICLE WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE BOOK: The Spinner’s Book of Fiction, by Jack London. To purchase the entire book, please order ISBN 0766195716.

The Red One

From ‘The Red One‘: There it was! The abrupt liberation of sound! As he timed it with his watch, Bassett likened it to the trump of an archangel. Walls of cities, he meditated, might well fall down before so vast and compelling a summons. For the thousandth time vainly he tried to analyze the tone quality of that enormous peal that dominated the land far into the strongholds of the surrounding tribes. The mountain gorge which was its source rang to the rising tide of it until it brimmed over and flooded earth and sky and air. With the wantonness of a sick man’s fancy, he likened it to the mighty cry of some Titan of the Elder World vexed with misery or wrath. Higher and higher it arose, challenging and demanding in such profounds of volume that it seemed intended for ears beyond the narrow confines of the solar system. There was in it, too, the clamor of protest in that there were no ears to hear and comprehend its utterance. Such the sick man’s fancy. Still he strove to analyze the sound. Sonorous as thunder was it, mellow as a golden bell, thin and sweet as a thrummed taut cord of silver no; it was none of these, nor a blend of these. There were no words nor semblances in his vocabulary and experience with which to describe the totality of that sound. Also includes ‘The Hussy,’ ‘Like Argus of the Ancient Times,’ and ‘The Princess.’

The People of the Abyss

The experiences related in this volume fell to me in the summer of 1902. I went down into the under world of London with an attitude of mind which I may best liken to that of the explorer. I was open to be convinced by the evidence of my eyes, rather than by the teachings of those who had not seen, or by the words of those who had seen and gone before. Further, I took with me certain simple criteria with which to measure the life of the under world. That which made for more life, for physical and spiritual health, was good; that which made for less life, which hurt, and dwarfed, and distorted life, was bad. It will be readily apparent to the reader that I saw much that was bad. Yet it must not be forgotten that the time of which I write was considered ‘good times’ in England. The starvation and lack of shelter I encountered constituted a chronic condition of misery which is never wiped out, even in the periods of greatest prosperity. Following the summer in question came a hard winter. Great numbers of the unemployed formed into processions, as many as a dozen at a time, and daily marched through the streets of London crying for bread. Mr. Justin McCarthy, writing in the month of January 1903, to the New York Independent, briefly epitomises the situation as follows: ‘The workhouses have no space left in which to pack the starving crowds who are craving every day and night at their doors for food and shelter. All the charitable institutions have exhausted their means in trying to raise supplies of food for the famishing residents of the garrets and cellars of London lanes and alleys. The quarters of the Salvation Army in various parts of London are nightly besieged by hosts of the unemployed and the hungry for whom neither shelter nor the means of sustenance can be provided.’ It has been urged that the criticism I have passed on things as they are in England is too pessimistic. I must say, in extenuation, that of optimists I am the most optimistic. But I measure manhood less by political aggregations than by individuals. Society grows, while political machines rack to pieces and become ‘scrap.’ For the English, so far as manhood and womanhood and health and happiness go, I see a broad and smiling future. But for a great deal of the political machinery, which at present mismanages for them, I see nothing else than the scrap heap.

The War of the Classes

The experiences related in this volume fell to me in the summer of 1902. I went down into the under world of London with an attitude of mind which I may best liken to that of the explorer. I was open to be convinced by the evidence of my eyes, rather than by the teachings of those who had not seen, or by the words of those who had seen and gone before. Further, I took with me certain simple criteria with which to measure the life of the under world. That which made for more life, for physical and spiritual health, was good; that which made for less life, which hurt, and dwarfed, and distorted life, was bad. It will be readily apparent to the reader that I saw much that was bad. Yet it must not be forgotten that the time of which I write was considered ‘good times’ in England. The starvation and lack of shelter I encountered constituted a chronic condition of misery which is never wiped out, even in the periods of greatest prosperity. Following the summer in question came a hard winter. Great numbers of the unemployed formed into processions, as many as a dozen at a time, and daily marched through the streets of London crying for bread. Mr. Justin McCarthy, writing in the month of January 1903, to the New York Independent, briefly epitomises the situation as follows: ‘The workhouses have no space left in which to pack the starving crowds who are craving every day and night at their doors for food and shelter. All the charitable institutions have exhausted their means in trying to raise supplies of food for the famishing residents of the garrets and cellars of London lanes and alleys. The quarters of the Salvation Army in various parts of London are nightly besieged by hosts of the unemployed and the hungry for whom neither shelter nor the means of sustenance can be provided.’ It has been urged that the criticism I have passed on things as they are in England is too pessimistic. I must say, in extenuation, that of optimists I am the most optimistic. But I measure manhood less by political aggregations than by individuals. Society grows, while political machines rack to pieces and become ‘scrap.’ For the English, so far as manhood and womanhood and health and happiness go, I see a broad and smiling future. But for a great deal of the political machinery, which at present mismanages for them, I see nothing else than the scrap heap.

The Cruise of the Snark

In 1906, Jack London set out from San Francisco with his wife and two crewmembers on a voyage across the Pacific. Newspaper readers were horrified by the proposed trip, which was inspired by Joshua Slocum’s Sailing Alone Around the World. London knew little about navigation, and his schooner, the Snark, possessed numerous defects, including a tendency to leak. London s account of this extraordinary trip is charming and fascinating by turns, and a wonderful display of his eye for poetic and ironic details. Navigating more by feel than by skill, London visited Hawaii, the Marquesas, Tahiti, and the Solomon Islands. For the most part, the voyagers were greeted with South Seas hospitality, though the trip had its dangers including head hunting natives. London claimed that sailing the Snark gave him his greatest sense of personal accomplishment, and The Cruise of the Snark is saturated with his enthusiasm and sheer love of adventure. An exciting new volume in the Adventure Classics series, this edition includes a new National Geographic map and excerpts from his wife Charmian s out of print account of the expedition, offering new insights into London s personality, and into his remarkable voyage.

The Road

In 1894, an eighteen year old Jack London quit his job shoveling coal, hopped a freight train, and left California on the first leg of a ten thousand mile odyssey. His adventure was an exaggerated version of the unemployed migrations made by millions of boys, men, and a few women during the original ‘great depression’ of the 1890s. By taking to The Road, young wayfarers like London forged a vast hobo subculture that was both a product of the new urban industrial order and a challenge to it. As London’s experience suggests, this hobo world was born of equal parts desperation and fascination. ‘I went on ‘The Road,” he writes, ‘because I couldn’t keep away from it…
because I was so made that I couldn’t work all my life on ‘one same shift’; because well, just because it was easier to than not to.’ The best stories that London told about his hoboing days can be found in ‘The Road‘, a collection of nine essays with accompanying illustrations, most of which originally appeared in ‘Cosmopolitan’ magazine between 1907 and 1908. His virile persona spoke to white middle class readers who vicariously escaped their desk bound lives and followed London down the hobo trail. The zest and humor of his tales, as Todd DePastino explains in his lucid introduction, often obscure their depth and complexity. ‘The Road‘ is as much a commentary on London’s disillusionment with wealth, celebrity, and the literary marketplace as it is a picaresque memoir of his youth.

Revolution and Other Essays

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: FOMA GORDYEEFF What, without asking, hither hurried Whcnctt And, without asking, Whither hurried hence I Oh, many a Cup of this forbidden Wine Must drown the memory of that insolence ! ‘ ‘J OMA GORDYEEFF’ is a big book I 1 not only is the breadth of Russia in it, but the expanse of life. Yet, though in each land, in this world of marts and exchanges, this age of trade and traffic, passionate figures rise up and demand of life what its fever is, in ‘ Foma GordyeefF ‘ it is a Russian who so rises up and demands. For Gorky, the Bitter One, is essentially a Russian in his grasp on the facts of life and in his treatment. All the Russian self analysis and insistent introspection are his. And, like all his brother Russians, ardent, passionate protest impregnates his work. There is a purpose to it. He writes because he has something to say which the world should hear. From that clenched fist of his, light and airy romances, pretty and sweet and beguiling, do not flow,but realities yes, big and brutal and repulsive, but real. He raises the cry of the miserable and the despised, and in a masterly arraignment of commercialism, protests against social conditions, against the grinding of the faces of the poor and weak, and the self pollution of the rich and strong, in their mad lust for place and power. It is to be doubted strongly if the average bourgeois, smug and fat and prosperous, can understand this man Foma Gor dyeeff. The rebellion in his blood is something to which their own does not thrill. To them it will be inexplicable that this man, with his health and his millions, could not go on living as his class lived, keeping regular hours at desk and stock exchange, driving close contracts, underbidding his competitors, and exulting in the business disasters of his fellows…
.

John Barleycorn

It all came to me one election day. It was on a warm California afternoon, and I had ridden down into the Valley of the Moon from the ranch to the little village to vote Yes and No to a host of proposed amendments to the Constitution of the State of California. Because of the warmth of the day I had had several drinks before casting my ballot, and divers drinks after casting it. Then I had ridden up through the vine clad hills and rolling pastures of the ranch, and arrived at the farm house in time for another drink and supper. ‘How did you vote on the suffrage amendment?’ Charmian asked. ‘I voted for it.’ She uttered an exclamation of surprise. For, be it known, in my younger days, despite my ardent democracy, I had been opposed to woman suffrage. In my later and more tolerant years I had been unenthusiastic in my acceptance of it as an inevitable social phenomenon. ‘Now just why did you vote for it?’ Charmian asked. I answered. I answered at length. I answered indignantly. The more I answered, the more indignant I became. No; I was not drunk. The horse I had ridden was well named ‘The Outlaw.’ I’d like to see any drunken man ride her.

The Son Of The Wolf

‘Carmen won’t last more than a couple of days.’ Mason spat out a chunk of ice and surveyed the poor animal ruefully, then put her foot in his mouth and proceeded to bite out the ice which clustered cruelly between the toes. ‘I never saw a dog with a highfalutin’ name that ever was worth a rap,’ he said, as he concluded his task and shoved her aside. ‘They just fade away and die under the responsibility. Did ye ever see one go wrong with a sensible name like Cassiar, Siwash, or Husky? No, sir! Take a look at Shookum here, he’s ‘ Snap! The lean brute flashed up, the white teeth just missing Mason’s throat. ‘Ye will, will ye?’ A shrewd clout behind the ear with the butt of the dog whip stretched the animal in the snow, quivering softly, a yellow slaver dripping from its fangs.

‘Dutch Courage’ and Other Stories

Jack London 1876 1916, was an American author and a pioneer in the then burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books. In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden 1909. Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower cost production of magazines. This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost 1902, The Call of the Wild 1903, The Sea Wolf 1904, The Game 1905, White Fang 1906, The Road 1907, Before Adam 1907, Adventure 1911, and The Scarlet Plague 1912.

The Faith of Men and Other Stories

I wash my hands of him at the start. I cannot father his tales, nor will I be responsible for them. I make these preliminary reservations, observe, as a guard upon my own integrity. I possess a certain definite position in a small way, also a wife; and for the good name of the community that honours my existence with its approval, and for the sake of her posterity and mine, I cannot take the chances I once did, nor foster probabilities with the careless improvidence of youth. So, I repeat, I wash my hands of him, this Nimrod, this mighty hunter, this homely, blue eyed, freckle faced Thomas Stevens. Having been honest to myself, and to whatever prospective olive branches my wife may be pleased to tender me, I can now afford to be generous. I shall not criticize the tales told me by Thomas Stevens, and, further, I shall withhold my judgment. If it be asked why, I can only add that judgment I have none. Long have I pondered, weighed, and balanced, but never have my conclusions been twice the same forsooth! because Thomas Stevens is a greater man than I.

Children of the Frost

From ‘The League of the Old Men’: At the Barracks a man was being tried for his life. He was an old man, a native from the Whitefish River, which empties into the Yukon below Lake Le Barge. All Dawson was wrought up over the affair, and likewise the Yukon dwellers for a thousand miles up and down. It has been the custom of the land robbing and sea robbing Anglo Saxon to give the law to conquered peoples, and ofttimes this law is harsh. But in the case of Imber the law for once seemed inadequate and weak. In the mathematical nature of things, equity did not reside in the punishment to be accorded him. The punishment was a foregone conclusion, there could be no doubt of that; and though it was capital, Imber had but one life, while the tale against him was one of scores. In fact, the blood of so many was upon his hands that the killings attributed to him did not permit of precise enumeration. Smoking a pipe by the trail side or lounging around the stove, men made rough estimates of the numbers that had perished at his hand. Also included in this volume are ‘In the Forests of the North,’ ‘The Law of Life,’ ‘Nam Bok the Unveracious,’ ‘The Master of Mystery,’ ‘The Sunlanders,’ ‘The Sickness of Lone Chief,’ ‘Keesh, the Son of Keesh,’ ‘The Death of Ligoun,’ and ‘Li Wan, the Fair.’

The Call Of The Wild And Selected Stories

Purchase one of 1st World Library’s Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. 1st World Library Literary Society is a non profit educational organization. Visit us online at www. 1stWorldLibrary. ORG Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide water dog, strong of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal, and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost. Buck lived at a big house in the sun kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge Miller’s place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half hidden among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was approached by gravelled driveways which wound about through wide spreading lawns and under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables, where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine clad servants’ cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors, green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge Miller’s boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot afternoon.

Tales of the Fish Patrol

Considered by many to be America’s finest author, Jack London, had little formal schooling. Initially, he attended school only through the 8th grade, although he was an avid reader, educating himself at public libraries, especially the Oakland Public Library under the tutelage of Ina Coolbrith, who later became the first poet laureate of California. In later years mid 1890s, Jack returned to high school in Oakland and graduated. He eventually gained admittance to U.C. Berkeley, but stayed only for six months, finding it to be ‘not alive enough’ and a ‘passionless pursuit of passionless intelligence’. Once Jack had resolved himself to succeed as an author, his diligent habits and innate skills catapulted him far beyond most of his literary peers in both perspective and content. By following a strict writing regimen of 1,000 words a day, he was able to produce a huge quantity of high quality work over a period of eighteen years. Jack had become the best selling, highest paid and most popular American author of his time.

Brown Wolf and Other Stories by Jack London, Fiction, Action & Adventure

Boys delight in men who have had adventures, and when they are privileged to read of such exploits in thrilling story form, that is the ‘seventh heaven’ for them. Such a ‘boys’ man’ was Jack London, whose whole life was one of stirring action on land and sea. Gifted as a story teller, he wrote books almost without end. Some of them, ‘The Call of the Wild,’ ‘The Sea Wolf’ and ‘White Fang,’ have already been recognized as fine books for boys. Others, volumes of short stories, contain many of like interest, possessing the same qualities that have made the other and longer stories so acceptable as juveniles. Effort has been made by the editor to bring together in one volume a number of such stories, not for the reason alone that there might be another Jack London book for boys, but also in order to add to our juvenile literature a volume likely ‘to be chewed and digested,’ as Bacon says, a book worthy ‘to be read whole, and with diligence and attention.’ For my belief is that boys read altogether too few of such books. Or perhaps it would be more correct to say, have too few opportunities to read such books, because so often we fail to see how quick in their reading their minds are to grasp the more difficult, and how keen and competent their conscience to draw the right conclusion when situations are presented wherein men err so grievously.

The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories

The Call of the Wild and White Fang, by Jack London, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today’s top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader’s viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences biographical, historical, and literary to enrich each reader’s understanding of these enduring works. Jack London’s two greatest novels, The Call of the Wild and White Fang originally intended as companions are here compiled in one volume. The Call of the Wild centers on a domesticated dog, Buck, who is kidnapped and sold to Klondike gold hunters. To survive Buck must listen to the Call and learn the ways of his wolf ancestors, who guide him from within. White Fang tells the story of a half wolf, half dog nearly destroyed by the vicious cruelty of men. Brought to the very brink of his existence, White Fang is lucky enough to experience the one thing that can save him human love. Adventurer and activist, philosopher and alcoholic, Jack London was a man of great contradictions and greater talent. Both of these novels are written in a simple, direct, and powerful style that decades of readers have admired and that writers have imitated. Tina Gianquitto holds a Ph.D. in American Literature from Columbia University and currently teaches at The College of the Mines in Colorado.

Moon-Face and Other Stories

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: LOCAL COLOR ‘T DO not see why you should not turn this I immense amount of unusual information to account,’ I told him. ‘Unlike most men equipped with similar knowledge, you have expression. Your style is ‘ ‘Is sufficiently er journalese ? ‘ he interrupted suavely. ‘Precisely! You could turn a pretty penny.’ But he interlocked his fingers meditatively, shrugged his shoulders, and dismissed the subject. ‘I have tried it. It does not pay.’ ‘It was paid for and published,’ he added, after a pause. ‘And I was also honored with sixty days in the Hobo.’ ‘The Hobo?’ I ventured. ‘The Hobo ‘ He fixed his eyes on my Spencer and ran along the titles while he cast his definition. ‘The Hobo, my dear fellow, is the chapter Section 4name for that particular place of detention in city and county jails wherein are assembled tramps, drunks, beggars, and the riff raff of petty offenders. The word itself is a pretty one, and it has a history. Hautbois there’s the French of it. Haut, meaning high, and bois, wood. In English it becomes hautboy, a wooden musical instrument of two foot tone, I believe, played with a double reed, an oboe, in fact. You remember in ‘ Henry IV’ ‘ ‘ The case of a treble hautboy Was a mansion for him, a court.’ From this to ho boy is but a step, and for that matter the English used the terms interchangeably. But and mark you, the leap paralyzes one crossing the Western Ocean, in New York City, hautboy, or ho boy, becomes the name by which the night scavenger is known. In a way one understands its being born of the contempt for wandering players and musical fellows. But see the beauty of it! the burn and the brand! The night scavenger, the pariah, the miserable, the despised, the man without caste! And in its next incarnation, consistently a…

To Build a Fire and Other Stories

Tor Classics are affordably priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate ‘reader friendly’ type sizes have been chosen for each title offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords. This edition of To Build a Fire and Other Stories includes an Introduction, Biographical Note, and Afterword by David Lubar. It was so cold that his spit froze in the air before it hit the ground. He was so far above the Artic Circle that the sun never rose. Seventy below zero, and there was nothing but whiteness in every direction: ice and snow. No trees, no houses, no wood, no warmth. He had only a few matches and a handful of frozen fingers. And yet, to survive, he had to build a fire…
Jack London’s tales of adventure were unsurpassed because London was there. From Alaska to the Yukon, from the Klondike to the Arctic tundra, London knew the outlaws and the wolves, the prospectors and the grizzlies. In these collected stories of man against the wilderness, London lays claim to the title of greatest outdoor adventure writer of all time.

The Strength of the Strong

Old Long Beard paused in his narrative, licked his greasy fingers, and wiped them on his naked sides where his one piece of ragged bearskin failed to cover him. Crouched around him, on their hams, were three young men, his grandsons, Deer Runner, Yellow Head, and Afraid of the Dark. In appearance they were much the same. Skins of wild animals partly covered them. They were lean and meagre of build, narrow hipped and crooked legged, and at the same time deep chested, with heavy arms and enormous hands. There was much hair on their chests and shoulders, and on the outsides of their arms and legs. Their heads were matted with uncut hair, long locks of which often strayed before their eyes, beady and black and glittering like the eyes of birds. They were narrow between the eyes and broad between the cheeks, while their lower jaws were projecting and massive. It was a night of clear starlight, and below them, stretching away remotely, lay range on range of forest covered hills. In the distance the heavens were red from the glow of a volcano. At their backs yawned the black mouth of a cave, out of which, from time to time, blew draughty gusts of wind.

South Sea Tales

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: diplomatic speech, handed the whale tooth to Mongondro. The old chief held the tooth in his hands for a long time. It was a beautiful tooth, and he yearned for it. Also, he divined the request that must accompany it. ‘No, no; whale teeth were beautiful,’ and his mouth watered for it, but he passed it back to Erirola with many apologies. In the early dawn John Starhurst was afoot, striding along the bush trail in his big leather boots, at his heels the faithful Narau, himself at the heels of a naked guide lent him by Mongondro to show the way to the next village, which was reached ‘by midday. Here a new guide showed the way. A mile in the rear plodded Erirola, the whale tooth in the basket slung on his . shoulder. For two days more he brought up the missionary’s rear, offering the tooth to the village chiefs. But village after village refused the tooth. It followed so quickly the missionary’s advent that ‘theydivined the request that would be made, and would have none of it. They were getting deep into the mountains, and Erirola took a secret trail, cut in ahead of the missionary, and reached the stronghold of the Buli of Gatoka. Now the Buli was unaware of John Starhurst’s imminent arrival. Also, the tooth was beautiful an extraordinary specimen, while the coloring of it was of the rarest order. The tooth was presented publicly. The Buli of Gatoka, seated on his best mat, surrounded by his chief men, three busy fly brushers at his back, deigned to receive from the hand of his herald the whale tooth presented by Ra Vatu and carried into the mountains by his cousin, Erirola. ‘A clapping of hands went up at the acceptation of the present, the assembled headmen, heralds, and fly brushers crying aloud in chorus: ‘A ! woi! woi! woi! A ! woi! woi! woi! A tabua levu !…

A Son of the Sun

Jack London 1876 1916, was an American author and a pioneer in the then burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books. In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden 1909. Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower cost production of magazines. This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost 1902, The Call of the Wild 1903, The Sea Wolf 1904, The Game 1905, White Fang 1906, The Road 1907, Before Adam 1907, Adventure 1911, and The Scarlet Plague 1912.

The House of Pride

Considered by many to be America’s finest author, Jack London, had little formal schooling. Initially, he attended school only through the 8th grade, although he was an avid reader, educating himself at public libraries, especially the Oakland Public Library under the tutelage of Ina Coolbrith, who later became the first poet laureate of California. In later years mid 1890s, Jack returned to high school in Oakland and graduated. He eventually gained admittance to U.C. Berkeley, but stayed only for six months, finding it to be ‘not alive enough’ and a ‘passionless pursuit of passionless intelligence’. Once Jack had resolved himself to succeed as an author, his diligent habits and innate skills catapulted him far beyond most of his literary peers in both perspective and content. By following a strict writing regimen of 1,000 words a day, he was able to produce a huge quantity of high quality work over a period of eighteen years. Jack had become the best selling, highest paid and most popular American author of his time.

The Night-Born and Other Stories

Jack London 1876 1916, was an American author and a pioneer in the then burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books. In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden 1909. Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower cost production of magazines. This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost 1902, The Call of the Wild 1903, The Sea Wolf 1904, The Game 1905, White Fang 1906, The Road 1907, Before Adam 1907, Adventure 1911, and The Scarlet Plague 1912.

In Hawaii with Jack London

Seven Jack London stories from Hawaii at the turn of the century from one of America’s greatest writers and adventurers. Always good to read and a must for all Jack London and Pacific enthusiasts.

The Turtles of Tasman

1911. Illustrated. American writer real name John Griffith London. London grew up in poverty, earning a living through various legal and illegal means. He was a sailor and took part in the Klondike gold rush. These experiences provided much of the material for his works and also made him a socialist. The Call of the Wild, the classic story of sled dog Buck brought him instant celebrity and established his readership to this day. The Turtles of Tasman begins: Law, order, and restraint had carved Frederick Travers’ face. It was the strong, firm face of one used to power and who had used power with wisdom and discretion. Clean living had made the healthy skin, and the lines graved in it were honest lines. Hard and devoted work had left its wholesome handiwork, that was all. Every feature of the man told the same story, from the clear blue of the eyes to the full head of hair, light brown, touched with grey, and smoothly parted and drawn straight across above the strong domed forehead. He was a seriously groomed man, and the light summer business suit no more than befitted his alert years, while it did not shout aloud that its possessor was likewise the possessor of numerous millions of dollars and property. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

The Human Drift

Jack London 1876 1916, was an American author and a pioneer in the then burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books. In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden 1909. Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower cost production of magazines. This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost 1902, The Call of the Wild 1903, The Sea Wolf 1904, The Game 1905, White Fang 1906, The Road 1907, Before Adam 1907, Adventure 1911, and The Scarlet Plague 1912.

On the Makaloa Mat

Jack London 1876 1916, was an American author and a pioneer in the then burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books. In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden 1909. Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower cost production of magazines. This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost 1902, The Call of the Wild 1903, The Sea Wolf 1904, The Game 1905, White Fang 1906, The Road 1907, Before Adam 1907, Adventure 1911, and The Scarlet Plague 1912.

White Fang, and Other Stories

Even as a pup, he is different from his brothers: A large gray cub among a litter of red haired puppies, with a quicker bite and heavier paw. When he leaves the protection of his snug cave, he and his mother are captured by the fire making gods man animals who live in teepees, and who determine that the pup is half dog, half wolf, and name him White Fang. White Fang finds himself relentlessly tormented by the tribe’s domestic dogs, and quickly learns to surpass them in cunning and viciousness. His brutality is encouraged even further when he is sold to a sadistic man who takes advantage of the dog’s massive size and tremendous strength to pit him in to the death dog fights. White Fang is driven near mad, until a young man comes along who offers him kindness and friendship. But friendship is something White Fang doesn’t understand…
yet. Jack London’s adventure masterpiece is not only a vivid account of the Klondike gold rush and North American Indian life, it is an intriguing study of the effects of our environments in forming who we are. Caldecott winner Ed Young’s exquisite illustrations bristle with energy in their portrayal of an angry young wolf struggling with the loss of wild independence that is his birthright, but gaining a new freedom through a profound and unconditional love.

The Sea-Wolf and Other Stories

This collection of some of Jack London’s stories includes ‘The Sea Wolf’, ‘The Sea Farmer’ and ‘Samuel’.

The Call of the Wild and Other Stories

Purchase one of 1st World Library’s Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. 1st World Library Literary Society is a non profit educational organization. Visit us online at www. 1stWorldLibrary. ORG Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide water dog, strong of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal, and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost. Buck lived at a big house in the sun kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge Miller’s place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half hidden among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was approached by gravelled driveways which wound about through wide spreading lawns and under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables, where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine clad servants’ cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors, green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge Miller’s boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot afternoon.

The Unabridged Jack London

London’s sprawling tales of heroic Klondike characters in an untamed wilderness have excited the imaginations of readers since the beginning of this century. This collection includes complete and original versions of London’s novels and short stories, including THE CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG, and THE SEA WOLF. 1,152.

Klondike Tales

As a young man in the summer of 1897, Jack London joined the Klondike gold rush. From that seminal experience emerged these gripping, inimitable wilderness tales, which have endured as some of London’s best and most defining work. With remarkable insight and unflinching realism, London describes the punishing adversity that awaited men in the brutal, frozen expanses of the Yukon, and the extreme tactics these adventurers and travelers adopted to survive. As Van Wyck Brooks observed, One felt that the stories had been somehow lived that they were not merely observed that the author was not telling tales but telling his life. This edition is unique to the Modern Library, featuring twenty three carefully chosen stories from London s three collected Northland volumes and his later Klondike Tales. It also includes two maps of the region, and notes on the text.

Tales of the Pacific

If you know London primarily through novels like ‘White Fang’, these stories will provide a new perspective. Full of intriguing characters and snippets of pidgin, they also highlight London’s concern with social issues.

The Collected Jack London

Five stories that epitomize Jack London’s mastery of the adventure story. ‘The White Silence,’ ‘In a Far Country,’ and ‘An Odyssey of the North’ bring the harshness of the frozen North powerfully to life. ‘The Sigh of McCoy’ reflects London s experiences as a sailor in the South Seas. ‘The Mexican’ combines London s talents as a sports writer with a sympathetic portrayal of a prize fighter involved in the Mexican Revolution. Publisher s Note.

Five Great Short Stories

Five stories that epitomize Jack London’s mastery of the adventure story. ‘The White Silence,’ ‘In a Far Country,’ and ‘An Odyssey of the North’ bring the harshness of the frozen North powerfully to life. ‘The Sigh of McCoy’ reflects London s experiences as a sailor in the South Seas. ‘The Mexican’ combines London s talents as a sports writer with a sympathetic portrayal of a prize fighter involved in the Mexican Revolution. Publisher s Note.

Northland Stories

Jack London’s fabled powers to entertain and enthrall are in full evidence in this collection of 15 fantastic tales. The restless energy of London’s vision ranges far in time and space, from the tall tale of a frontier trapper hunting a mammoth to an extraterrestrial encounter to new worlds of the future our present? wherein the world is ravaged by an alien virus.

Fantastic Tales

Jack London’s fabled powers to entertain and enthrall are in full evidence in this collection of 15 Fantastic Tales. The restless energy of London’s vision ranges far in time and space, from the tall tale of a frontier trapper hunting a mammoth to an extraterrestrial encounter to new worlds of the future our present? wherein the world is ravaged by an alien virus.

Jack London in Aloha-Land

Mrs London writes in her foreword ‘In this journal covering a few months spent ten years ago in Hawaii, concluding with a resume of experiences there in 1915 1916, I have tried to limn a picture of the charm of the Hawaiian islander as he was, and is becoming, with the enchantment of his lofty isles, and their abundant hospitality. During the original writing many elisions were advised by Jack London, as being too personal of himself for me, being me, to publish. However, in the circumstances of his untimely passing, and in view of a desire made evident to me in countless letters as well as in the press, for biographical work, I have been led to reinstate and elaborate much of the mass of data. Even in face of his objections at the time, I had stoutly disagreed, maintaining that the lovers of his soul and his work would value revelation of his personality and manner of living life.’

Lost Face And Other Stories

‘Painted in broad, sweeping strokes, each tale is a tour de force.’ New York TimesAt his peak, about the time this collection was first published in 1910, Jack London was the highest paid and perhaps the most popular living American writer. Lost Face consists of seven short works, including the title story and his finest and best known short story, ‘To Build a Fire.’ Now in paperback for the first time, this collection appears as it was originally published. Jack London grew up in poverty, educated himself through public libraries, and, in addition to writing, devoted his life to promoting socialism although he eventually resigned from the Socialist Party. Despite his financial and critical success, in the end he succumbed to alcoholism and depression and died of a drug overdose. During the 1898 gold rush, London traveled to the Klondike to seek his fortune. It was this experience that had the most profound effect on his writing. Not only did he mine the far north environment for subject matter and all the stories in Lost Face take place in the Yukon, but his laconic style drew upon its cold harshness and loneliness, where people and beasts had to work together or against each other for survival. London’s stories are treasured for their insights into the psychology of both people and animals particularly dogs and Lost Face is a brilliant collection of some of the finest examples of London’s craft.

Jack London’s Tales of Cannibals and Headhunters

A ship’s captain, his vessel ready to explode from a fire within its cargo hold, desperately searches for a way to save his crew. A missionary in Fiji is clubbed to death by a cannibal chief to satisfy a debt of honor. A scientist agrees to have his head chopped off in return for a last glimpse of a huge alien object half buried in the jungles of Guadalcanal. A Melanesian youth, sold into slavery, gains revenge against his sadistic white overseer. With unbridled barbarity, the crew of a European ship massacres scores of islanders. These are some of the incidents in the action filled short stories found in Jack London’s Tales of Cannibals and Headhunters. Though London’s bestsellers about the frozen Northland are known to most, few readers are familiar with his tales set in the romantic and dangerous South Seas an area of the world with which Jack London became intimate while traveling aboard his yacht, The Snark, in the first decade of the twentieth century. For the first time these stories are collected in a single volume with notes, an introduction, and an afterword that help to illuminate the racial tension of the colonial period in the Pacific. The stories are illustrated with the original artwork, several maps including one of London’s own, and photographs of the region.

The Asian Writings of Jack London

Examines American writer Jack London’s journalistic and literary contributions about Asia, his insights into Asian ethnic and political complexities, and his vision for pan Asian/American cooperation. This book includes an anthology of London’s major writings on Asia.

When God Laughs and Other Stories

‘Carquinez had relaxed finally. He stole a glance at the rattling windows, looked upward at the beamed roof, and listened for a moment to the savage roar of the south easter as it caught the bungalow in its bellowing jaws. Then he held his glass between him and the fire and laughed for joy through the golden wine.’

Table of Contents

When God Laughs
The Apostate
A Wicked Woman
‘Just Meat’
Created He Them
The Chinago
Make Westing
Semper Idem
A Nose for the King
The ‘Francis Spaight’
A Curious Fragment
A Piece of Steak

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The Arctic: an anthology of the finest writing on the Arctic and the Antarctic

A beautiful literary anthology published to commemorate the International Polar Year and remind us what we re in danger of losing.

The Arctic and Antarctic ice shelves have been an object of obsession for as long as we ve known they existed. Countless explorers, including such legends as Richard Byrd, Ernest Shackleton, and Robert Falcon Scott, have risked their lives to chart their frozen landscapes. Now, for the first time in human history, we are in legitimate danger of seeing polar ice dramatically shrink, break apart, or even disappear. The Ends of the Earth, a collection of the very best writing on the Arctic and Antarctic, will simultaneously commemorate four centuries of exploring and scientific study, and make the call for preservation.
Stocked with first person narratives, cultural histories, nature and science writing, and fiction, this book is a compendium of the greats of their fields: including legendary polar explorers and such writers as Jon Krakauer, Jack London, Diane Ackerman, Barry Lopez, and Ursula K. LeGuin. Edited by two contemporary authorities on exploring and the environment, The Ends of the Earth is a memorable collection of terrific writing and a lasting contribution to the debate over global warming and the future of the polar regions themselves.

About International Polar Year

International Polar Year which begins in spring 2007 is a major international science initiative that aims to focus public attention on the polar regions and our effect on them. The last such initiative, the International Geophysical Year in 1957 58, involved 80,000 scientists from 67 countries. This one promises to be bigger still.

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