Doris Betts Books In Order

Novels

  1. Tall Houses in Winter (1957)
  2. The Scarlet Thread (1964)
  3. The River To Pickle Beach (1972)

Collections

  1. The Gentle Insurrection, and Other Stories (1954)
  2. The Astronomer, and Other Stories (1965)
  3. Beasts of the Southern Wild and Other Stories (1973)

Novels Book Covers

Collections Book Covers

Doris Betts Books Overview

The River To Pickle Beach

Bebe Sellar and her husband Jack are managing several cottages in Pickle Beach, North Carolina, when they meet Mickey McCane, an aggressive and tormented man, and together they all try to deal with the assassination of Robert Kennedy and the hot summer of 1968.

The Gentle Insurrection, and Other Stories

The stories in this extraordinary first collection are concerned with some of the most private and complicated issues: living and dying, growing old, questioning one’s beliefs, and recognizing one’s own failings. Whether it is an old man struggling to come to terms with an incident in his past or a meddling spinster who is forced to recognize the subtle dance of resentment, in each of these stories a ‘gentle insurrection’ occurs that changes lives forever.

The Astronomer, and Other Stories

All but one of these seven stories and one novella take place in small towns in North Carolina, and all of them concern ordinary people teetering upon the knowledge of their own insignificance. First published in 1965, this second collection of short fiction by Doris Betts evinces her breathtaking mastery of the genre.

Beasts of the Southern Wild and Other Stories

Back in print at last, the nine beautifully crafted tales in Beasts of the Southern Wild and Other Stories display Doris Betts at the top of her form: compassionate, witty, and unforgettable.

‘The Ugliest Pilgrim’ takes you into the adventures and into the heart of a disfigured young woman who has run away from her life in search of a better one. This award-winning story is the basis for the musical Violet, which won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. In ‘Hitchhiker,’ a wary secretary hitches a ride in a boat with a man hell-bent on saving fish; instead he saves her from the river — and herself. And in the title story, Betts brilliantly captures the inner life of a teacher and writer struggling to control her classroom, her household, and her life.

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