Anthony Burgess Books In Order

The Long Day Wanes: A Malayan Trilogy Books In Publication Order

  1. Time for a Tiger (1956)
  2. The Enemy in the Blanket (1957)
  3. Beds in the East (1959)

Enderby Books In Publication Order

  1. Enderby (1968)
  2. Enderby Outside (1968)
  3. The Clockwork Testament (1974)
  4. Enderby’s Dark Lady (1984)

Standalone Novels In Publication Order

  1. The Wanting Seed (1956)
  2. The Doctor is Sick (1960)
  3. The Right to an Answer (1960)
  4. Devil of a State (1961)
  5. One Hand Clapping, (1961)
  6. The Worm and the Ring (1961)
  7. A Clockwork Orange (1962)
  8. Honey for the Bears (1963)
  9. Inside Mr. Enderby (1963)
  10. The Eve of Saint Venus (1964)
  11. Nothing like the Sun (1964)
  12. A Vision of Battlements (1965)
  13. Tremor of Intent (1966)
  14. MF (1971)
  15. Napoleon Symphony (1974)
  16. A Long Trip to Teatime (1976)
  17. Beard’s Roman Women (1976)
  18. Moses (1976)
  19. Abba Abba (1977)
  20. 1985 (1978)
  21. Man of Nazareth (1979)
  22. The Kingdom of the Wicked (1980)
  23. Earthly Powers (1980)
  24. The End of the World News (1982)
  25. The Pianoplayers (1986)
  26. Any Old Iron (1989)
  27. Mozart and the Wolf Gang (1991)
  28. A Dead Man in Deptford (1993)
  29. Byrne (1995)
  30. The Black Prince (With: Adam Roberts) (2018)

Standalone Plays In Publication Order

  1. Stanley Kubrick’s Clockwork Orange (With: ) (1972)
  2. Oberon Old and New (1985)
  3. Blooms of Dublin (1986)
  4. A Clockwork Orange 2004 (1990)

Non-Fiction Books In Publication Order

  1. Language Made Plain (1964)
  2. Here Comes Everybody (1965)
  3. Coaching Days of England (1966)
  4. The Age of the Grand Tour (1967)
  5. The Novel Now (1967)
  6. Shakespeare (1970)
  7. Joysprick (1973)
  8. New York (1976)
  9. Ernest Hemingway and His World (1978)
  10. This Man & Music (1982)
  11. On Going to Bed (1982)
  12. The Heritage of British Literature (With: Elizabeth Bowen) (1983)
  13. 99 Novels (1984)
  14. Flame into Being (1985)
  15. Homage To Qwert Yuiop (1986)
  16. Little Wilson and Big God (1987)
  17. You’ve Had Your Time (1990)
  18. On Mozart (1991)
  19. A Mouthful of Air (1992)

Short Story Collections In Publication Order

  1. Two Tales of the Future (1980)
  2. But Do Blondes Prefer Gentlemen? (1986)
  3. The Devil’s Mode (1989)
  4. Future Imperfect (1994)
  5. One Man’s Chorus (1998)

Anthologies In Publication Order

  1. The Book of Spies: An Anthology of Literary Espionage (2003)

The Long Day Wanes: A Malayan Trilogy Book Covers

Enderby Book Covers

Standalone Novels Book Covers

Standalone Plays Book Covers

Non-Fiction Book Covers

Short Story Collections Book Covers

Anthologies Book Covers

Anthony Burgess Books Overview

The Wanting Seed

Set in the near future, The Wanting Seed is a Malthusian comedy about the strange world overpopulation will produce. Tristram Foxe and his wife, Beatrice Joanna, live in their skyscraper world where official family limitation glorifies homosexuality. Eventually, their world is transformed into a chaos of cannibalistic dining clubs, fantastic fertility rituals, and wars without anger. It is a novel both extravagantly funny and grimly serious.

The Doctor is Sick

Dr. Edwin Spindrift has been sent home from Burma with a brain tumor. Closer to words than to people, his sense of reality is further altered by his condition. When he escapes from the hospital the night before his surgery, things and people he hardly knew existed swoop down on him as he careens through an adventurous night in London. ‘Fine, sly, rich comedy…
.’ NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW by the author of A CLOCKWORK ORANGE.

One Hand Clapping,

With film rights acquired by Francis Ford Coppola, this comic novel of instant riches is back in stock. From the author of A Clockwork Orange, One Hand Clapping is a comedy of game shows and greed, high stakes and the high life. The tragi comedy of used car salesman Howard Shirley, his photographic brain, and the modern world’s trivia and trivialities makes for vintage Burgess at once hilarious and provocative. ‘Witty and shrewdly joyful.’ The New York Times Book Review ‘A funny, pointed novel.’ The New Yorker ‘Ingeniously and devilishly funny.’ The Atlantic Monthly

A Clockwork Orange

A brilliant novel…
a savage satire on the distortions of the single and collective minds. New York Times Anthony Burgess has written what looks like a nasty little shocker, but is really that rare thing in English letters: a philosophical novel. TimeA terrifying tale about good and evil and the meaning of human freedom, A Clockwork Orange became an instant classic when it was published in 1962 and has remained so ever since. Anthony Burgess takes us on a journey to a nightmarish future where sociopathic criminals rule the night. Brilliantly told in harsh invented slang by the novel’s main character and merciless droog, fifteen year old Alex, this influential novel is now available in a student edition. The Norton Critical Edition of A Clockwork Orange is based on the first British edition and includes Burgess s original final chapter. It is accompanied by Mark Rawlinson s preface, explanatory annotations, and textual notes. A glossary of the Russian origin terms that inspired Alex s dialect is provided to illustrate the process by which Burgess arrived at the distinctive style of this novel. Backgrounds and Contexts presents a wealth of materials chosen by the editor to enrich the reader s understanding of this unforgettable work, many of them by Burgess himself. Burgess s views on writing A Clockwork Orange, its philosophical issues, and the debates over the British edition versus the American edition and the novel versus the film adaptation are all included. Related writings that speak to some of the novel s central issues youthful style, behavior modification, and art versus morality are provided by Paul Rock and Stanley Cohen, B. F. Skinner, John R. Platt, Joost A. M. Meerloo, William Sargent, and George Steiner. Criticism is divided into two sections, one addressing the novel and the other Stanley Kubrick s film version. Five major reviews of the novel are reprinted along with a wide range of scholarly commentary, including, among others, David Lodge on the American reader; Julie Carson on linguistic invention; Zinovy Zinik on Burgess and the Russian language; Geoffrey Sharpless on education, masculinity, and violence; Shirley Chew on circularity; Patrick Parrinder on dystopias; Robbie B. H. Goh on language and social control; and Steven M. Cahn on freedom. A thorough analysis of the film adaptation of A Clockwork Orange is provided in reviews by Vincent Canby, Pauline Kael, and Christopher Ricks; in Philip Strick and Penelope Houston s interview with Stanley Kubrick; and in interpretive essays by Don Daniels, Alexander Walker, Philip French, Thomas Elsaesser, Tom Dewe Mathews, and Julian Petley. A Selected Bibliography is also included.

Honey for the Bears

‘There are so few genuinely entertaining novels around that we ought to cheer whenever one turns up. Continuous, fizzing energy…
. Honey for the Bears is a triumph.’ Kingsley Amis, New York TimesA sharply written satire, Honey for the Bears sends an unassuming antiques dealer, Paul Hussey, to Russia to do one final deal on the black market as a favor for a dead friend’s wife. Even on the ship’s voyage across, the Russian sensibility begins to pervade: lots of secrets and lots of vodka. When his American wife is stricken by a painful rash and he is interrogated at his hotel by Soviet agents who know that he is trying to sell stylish synthetic dresses to the mas*ses starved for fashion, his precarious inner balance is thrown off for good. More drink follows, discoveries of his wife’s illicit affair with another woman, and his own submerged sexual feelings come breaking through the surface, bubbling up in Russian champagne and caviar.

Nothing like the Sun

The life and loves of William Shakespeare, as seen by the great Anthony Burgess a truly fascinating novel that shows both authors at their absolute best.

Tremor of Intent

A brilliantly funny spy novel from the author of the ground breaking A Clockwork Orange. Denis Hillier is an aging British agent based in Yugoslavia. His old school friend Roper has defected to the USSR to become one of the evil empire’s great scientific minds. Hillier must bring Roper back to England or risk losing his fat retirement bonus. As thoughtful as it is funny, this morality tale of a Secret Service gone mad features sex, gluttony, violence, treachery, and religion. Anthony Burgess’s cast of astonishing characters includes Roper’s German prostitute wife; Miss Devi and her Tamil love treatise; and the large Mr. Theodorescu, international secret monger and lascivious gourmand. A rare combination of the deadly serious and the absurd, the lofty and the lusty, Tremor of Intent will hold you in its thrall.

Abba Abba

A story which presents an interesting what if proposition concerning two poets, John Keats and Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli, who may or may not have met in Rome in 1820 1821. Burgess’ other novels include ‘A Clockwork Orange’ and ‘Earthly Powers’.

1985

Ingenious, chilling and darkly comic, 1985 combines a devastating critique of George Orwell’s 1984 with a terrifying vision of the future. As memorable and shocking as A Clockwork Orange, it is also as powerful and unsettling as anything Burgess has written.

The Kingdom of the Wicked

A Roman saga, taking in the excesses of Tiberius, Caligula and Nero and an irreverent account of the early days of Christianity. Sadoc, a dying shipping clerk, sets down for future generations a tale of epic proportions: he is charged with recounting no less an event than the birth of Christianity.

Earthly Powers

Anthony Burgess’ epic masterpiece follows the lives of two men who each represent different kinds of earthly power. Kenneth Toomey is an eminent novelist, world famous homosexual, and a man who has outlived his contemporaries to survive into honoured, bitter, luxurious old age as a celebrity of dubious notoriety. Don Carlo Campanati is a man of God, who rises through the Vatican as a subtle negotiator and shrewd manipulator to become the controversial architect of church revolution and a candidate for sainthood. Through the lives of these two men, related to each other not only by family ties but also by sympathy, genius and a deep common understanding of mankind’s frailties, Burgess explores the very essence of power.

A Dead Man in Deptford

With A Dead Man in Deptford, Burgess concluded his literary career to overwhelming acclaim for his re creation of the Elizabethan poet Christopher Marlowe. In lavish, pitch perfect, and supple, readable prose, Burgess matches his splendid Shakespeare novel, Nothing Like the Sun. The whole world of Elizabethan England from the intrigues of the courtroom, through the violent streets of London, to the glory of the theater comes alive in this joyous celebration of the life of Christopher Marlowe, murdered in suspicious circumstances in a tavern brawl in Deptford more than four hundred years ago.

Byrne

Burgess’s posthumous tour de force scans the upheavals of the 20th century through the ribald adventures of its eponymous sub Byronic hero. ‘Vastly amusing, sparkling, stimulating…
learned, witty, and wildly rhymed’. ‘Atlantic Monthly’.

Stanley Kubrick’s Clockwork Orange (With: )

A brilliant novel…
a savage satire on the distortions of the single and collective minds. New York Times Anthony Burgess has written what looks like a nasty little shocker, but is really that rare thing in English letters: a philosophical novel. TimeA terrifying tale about good and evil and the meaning of human freedom, A Clockwork Orange became an instant classic when it was published in 1962 and has remained so ever since. Anthony Burgess takes us on a journey to a nightmarish future where sociopathic criminals rule the night. Brilliantly told in harsh invented slang by the novel’s main character and merciless droog, fifteen year old Alex, this influential novel is now available in a student edition. The Norton Critical Edition of A Clockwork Orange is based on the first British edition and includes Burgess s original final chapter. It is accompanied by Mark Rawlinson s preface, explanatory annotations, and textual notes. A glossary of the Russian origin terms that inspired Alex s dialect is provided to illustrate the process by which Burgess arrived at the distinctive style of this novel. Backgrounds and Contexts presents a wealth of materials chosen by the editor to enrich the reader s understanding of this unforgettable work, many of them by Burgess himself. Burgess s views on writing A Clockwork Orange, its philosophical issues, and the debates over the British edition versus the American edition and the novel versus the film adaptation are all included. Related writings that speak to some of the novel s central issues youthful style, behavior modification, and art versus morality are provided by Paul Rock and Stanley Cohen, B. F. Skinner, John R. Platt, Joost A. M. Meerloo, William Sargent, and George Steiner. Criticism is divided into two sections, one addressing the novel and the other Stanley Kubrick s film version. Five major reviews of the novel are reprinted along with a wide range of scholarly commentary, including, among others, David Lodge on the American reader; Julie Carson on linguistic invention; Zinovy Zinik on Burgess and the Russian language; Geoffrey Sharpless on education, masculinity, and violence; Shirley Chew on circularity; Patrick Parrinder on dystopias; Robbie B. H. Goh on language and social control; and Steven M. Cahn on freedom. A thorough analysis of the film adaptation of A Clockwork Orange is provided in reviews by Vincent Canby, Pauline Kael, and Christopher Ricks; in Philip Strick and Penelope Houston s interview with Stanley Kubrick; and in interpretive essays by Don Daniels, Alexander Walker, Philip French, Thomas Elsaesser, Tom Dewe Mathews, and Julian Petley. A Selected Bibliography is also included.

Shakespeare

Like Burgess’s early novel, Nothing Like the Sun: A Story of Shakespeare‘s Love Life, this equally delightful factual treatment of what we know of the Bard combines Burgess’s stimulating erudition and his well informed imagination. The result is at once a speculative biography, a theatrical history, and a re creation of the Elizabethan age. Whether a vivid retracing of the evolution Elizabethan theater, a bravura reconstruction of the first performance of Hamlet, an infiltration of the intricacies of the court of the Virgin Queen, or an elegy on the era’s end with the distrastrous Essex Rebellion, Burgess author of the classic A Clockwork Orange sets the stage for England’s most glorious time and turns the spotlight on the figure of William Shakespeare. ‘Animated by affection and an understanding of the creative imagination that only a creative writer can bring to bear.’ Atlantic Monthly ‘A smooth flowing narrative, often enlivened by Anthony Burgess’s Joycean appetite for linguistic fantasy.’ Economist ‘Bright, racy…
knowledgeable and humorous, alternately sensible and quirky.’ Terry Eagleton, Commonweal ‘Burgess’s wonderfully well stocked mind and essentially wayward spirits are just right for summoning up an apparition of the Bard…
.’ Daily Telegraph

This Man & Music

Anthony Burgess was the author of over 50 books, including his best known novel, ‘A Clockwork Orange.’ But Burgess always emphasized music as the ruling passion in his creative life. Largely self taught in music, Burgess composed his first symphony before he was twenty, many years before his first novel, and he was the composer of over 65 musical works. In these deeply insightful meditations, the renowned writer explores the meaning of music, the intention of the composer and the process of composition, and the seemingly elusive relationships between literature and music. Burgess shows how ‘the process of literary composition are revealed by the writers themselves’ and then gathers evidence to understand the ‘inexplicable magic’ of the details of the operation of music what is music’s ‘intelligibility’? From Shakespeare to the lyric verse of Gerard Manley Hopkins, from the modernists T.S. Eliot and James Joyce to the modern lyricists Lorenz Hart and Stephen Sondheim, Burgess reveals how prose writers have struggled to tap the inherent musicality of their material. This treasured classic, at last back in print, provides a fascinating perspective on the mutually enriching relationship of these two creative arts by a man who mastered them both.

A Mouthful of Air

The author of more than 50 books including the classic A Clockwork Orange presents a fascinating survey of language: how it reached its present situation; how it operates now; and how it will develop in the future. Anthony Burgess covers everything from Shakespeare’s pronunciation, to the politics of speech, to the place of English in the world, and more.

The Devil’s Mode

Included in this collection are eight short stories and a 110 page novella, ‘Hun’, about the life and loves of Attila and his fight against the patricians of Rome. The author has written over 50 books including ‘Any Old Iron’, ‘Earthly Powers’ and ‘A Clockwork Orange’.

The Book of Spies: An Anthology of Literary Espionage

A collection of work from some of the finest novelists of the 20th century. Inspired by the politics of tyranny or war, each of these writers chose the basic elements of highly evolved spy fiction as the framework for a literary novel. The book offers a diverse array of selections that combine raw excitement & intellectual sophistication in an expertly guided tour of the dark world of clandestine conflict. We meet diplomats, political police, agents, provocateurs, resistance fighters, & assassins players in the Great Game, or victims of the Cold War. The authors include: Eric Ambler, Anthony Burgess, Joseph Conrad, Maxim Gorky, Graham Greene, John le Carre, W. Somerset Maugham, Charles McCarry, Baroness Orczy, John Steinbeck, & Rebecca West.

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