Alexander Pushkin Books In Order

Novels

  1. Prisoner of the Caucasus (1820)
  2. Poltava (1829)
  3. Boris Godunov (1831)
  4. Eugene Onegin (1833)
  5. The Queen of Spades (1834)
  6. Egyptian Nights (1835)
  7. The Captain’s Daughter (1836)
  8. A Journey to Arzrum (1836)
  9. The Bronze Horseman (1837)
  10. Dubrovsky (1841)
  11. The Daughter of the Commandant (2006)

Collections

  1. The Queen of Spades and Other Stories (1978)
  2. The Golden Cockerel (1990)
  3. Eugene Onegin and Other Stories (2001)
  4. The Bridegroom (2002)
  5. Ruslan and Lyudmila (2010)
  6. Boris Godunov and Little Tragedies (2010)

Non fiction

Novels Book Covers

Collections Book Covers

Non fiction Book Covers

Alexander Pushkin Books Overview

Boris Godunov

Like many writers, Alexander Pushkin often created multiple versions of the same work, leaving readers to wonder which he intended as final and authoritative a question complicated, moreover, by his fraught relationship with the repressive regime of tsar Nicholas I. Illuminating the creative processes and historical realities that shaped Pushkin’s writing, this richly annotated series reproduces each work exactly as it appeared in the final Russian language edition published during Pushkin s lifetime, resulting in the handsome artifactual feel of an original Pushkin text. In volumes edited by distinguished Pushkin scholars from Russia and beyond, the series offers detailed textological analysis that seeks a balance between the history of a work s conception and its publication. Based on the 1835 edition published by A. F. Smirdin, Boris Godunov is the second volume in the series. Pushkin s only full length play, it was inspired by the political intrigues, social turmoil, and multifaceted personalities of Russia s Time of Troubles 1598 1613. Completed just months before the suppressed revolt of the Decembrists, the play features a feeble minded tsar, his able and ambitious brother in law, a rightful heir who died under mysterious circumstances, and the pretender who emerged years later to claim the dead youth’s identity. Ambiguous and controversial, Boris Godunov provides rich material for the consideration of Pushkin and his artistic legacy.

Eugene Onegin

In time for the bicentennial of Pushkin’s birth, a wonderful new translation of his classic novel by Douglas R. Hofstadter, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning Gdel, Escher, Bach and Le Ton beau de Marot When Alexander Pushkin published his classic romantic novel of thwarted love and conflicting loyalties in 1833, readers found the entire work had been composed in a unique sonnet form with an intricate rhythmic and rhyming structure. Not only is Douglas Hofstadter’s new translation of Eugene Onegin written in Pushkin stanzas, but his preface, discussing Pushkin, his novel, its form and content, and the challenges of translation, is written in the same verse form. Hofstadter’s version is, however, distinctly American and colloquial in style, and playful with punning and alliteration. Fans of Hofstadter’s Le Ton beau de Marot will be delighted to see his meticulous theories of translation put into practice in what seems destined to become the definitive English language version of Eugene Onegin. It is sure to bring new and deserving readers to this neglected literary jewel.

The Queen of Spades

ReadHowYouWant publishes a wide variety of best selling books in Large and Super Large fonts in partnership with leading publishers. EasyRead books are available in 11pt and 13pt. type. EasyRead Large books are available in 16pt, 16pt Bold, and 18pt Bold type. EasyRead Super Large books are available in 20pt. Bold and 24pt. Bold Type. You choose the format that is right for you. Pushkin’s novella ?The Queen of Spades? offers a superb blend of sentimentality and melodrama. The story recounts man?s fascination with fortune, power and secrecy. An enthralling book that explores fatal addiction with gambling that leads many to despair and ruin. To find more titles in your format, Search in Books using EasyRead and the size of the font that makes reading easier and more enjoyable for you.

The Captain’s Daughter

Pushkin’s version of the historical novel in the style of Walter Scott, this final prose work also reflects his fascination with and research into Russian history of the 18th century. During the reign of Catherine the Great, the young Grinev sets out for his new career in the army and en route performs an act of kindness by giving his warm coat to a man freezing in a blizzard. This action reaps its reward when he subsequently finds himself caught up in the rebellion headed by the infamous, and strangely familiar, Pugachev. Rivalry with a fellow officer for the affections of Captain Mironov’s daughter further complicates Grinev’s affairs, and ultimately it is only an appeal by Masha Mironova, the eponymous captain’s daughter, to the Empress herself that can unravel a tangled web.

The Bronze Horseman

This last and most brilliant narrative poem by Russia’s greatest poet, Alexander Pushkin, should form an essential part of all courses in Russian literature. It combines praise of Peter the Great and his city of St Petersburg with a dramatic account of the devastating flood of 1824 and a lowly individual’s resultant insanity. The political, historical, religious, ecological, and metaphysical existential questions which Pushkin formulates with dazzling power and concision have been the subject of endless critical debate. This new student edition includes an interpretative introduction which seeks to accommodate conflicting critical readings, copious linguistic and literary commentary, and a separate short essay on the poem’s St Petersburg background.

Dubrovsky

One of Pushkin’s most thrilling prose works, Dubrovsky follows the adventures of an aristocrat turned brigand and his audacious scheme for revenge. It is published here with the short story Egyptian Nights. Dubrovsky is the son of a landowner whose property has been confiscated by a corrupt and malicious general. After his father dies, and his faithful servants burn his ancestral home to the ground, Dubrovsky turns to crime. But to achieve his ultimate aim of avenging his father, he must resort to subtler means than banditry. Masquerading as a French tutor, he enters the General s house and sets about beguiling his daughter. Asking hard questions of our faith in social institutions, in particular the law, Dubrovsky displays the considerable storytelling skill of Russia s greatest poet. Alexander Pushkin wrote lyric and narrative poems, but his masterwork is the verse novel Eugene Onegin.

The Daughter of the Commandant

Aleksandre Sergeevich Pushkin is considered the greatest Russian poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. His style of storytelling uses local speech while combining romance, satire and drama. Pushkin was an outspoken man and because of this he made many enemies. Stories were spread abroad about him. Because of these rumors, Puskin ended up in a duel with his brother in law where he was mortally wounded. The Daughter of the Commandant was published in 1836. In this tale his father sends Pyotr Andreyich Grinyov to the army. When he arrives at his station he dines with the Commandant’s family and falls in love with the commandant’s daughter. Masha. Pyotr becomes involved with a Cossack revolution and is eventually sentenced to death for treason. His life is spared when the Commandant’s daughter petitions the Empress for his freedom.

The Queen of Spades and Other Stories

This volume contains new translations of four of Pushkin’s best works of fiction. The Queen of Spades has long been acknowledged as one of the world’s greatest short stories, in which Pushkin explores the nature of obsession. The Tales of Belkin are witty parodies of sentimentalism, while Peter the Great’s Blackamoor is an early experiment with recreating the past. The Captain’s Daughter is a novel length masterpiece which combines historical fiction in the manner of Sir Walter Scott with the devices of the Russian fairy tale. The Introduction provides close readings of the stories and places them in their European literary context. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World’s Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford’s commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up to date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

The Golden Cockerel

Alexander Pushkin 1799 1837 is, for Russians, their greatest writer; Eugene Onegin is his greatest work. Yet it remains little known outside Russia. Attempts to render Pushkin’s Russian stanzas into verse have tried in vain to imitate the most inimitable features of the original, while masking many of its other glories. This prose version, for the first time, gives us a Eugene Onegin that is easy and enjoyable to read. Where previous versions lost the novel in the verse, Roger Clarke has discarded the verse to bring us the novel. And more than the novel: what shines through here are not only Puskin’s touching story and subtle characterisation, but his incisive pictures of contemporary Russian life and landscapes, his social and literary comment, his humour, and indeed the essential poetry of the work. The addition of four captivating verse tales from Pushkin’s early maturity makes this book a must for anybody interested in Russian or European literature.

Eugene Onegin and Other Stories

Alexander Pushkin 1799 1837 is, for Russians, their greatest writer; Eugene Onegin is his greatest work. Yet it remains little known outside Russia. Attempts to render Pushkin’s Russian stanzas into verse have tried in vain to imitate the most inimitable features of the original, while masking many of its other glories. This prose version, for the first time, gives us a Eugene Onegin that is easy and enjoyable to read. Where previous versions lost the novel in the verse, Roger Clarke has discarded the verse to bring us the novel. And more than the novel: what shines through here are not only Puskin’s touching story and subtle characterisation, but his incisive pictures of contemporary Russian life and landscapes, his social and literary comment, his humour, and indeed the essential poetry of the work. The addition of four captivating verse tales from Pushkin’s early maturity makes this book a must for anybody interested in Russian or European literature.

Ruslan and Lyudmila

Spirited away by the evil sorcerer Chernomor on the day of her wedding, Lyudmila waits for her beloved Ruslan to rescue her. However, before he can effect her release, the gallant Ruslan must first endure all the trials and tribulations that the world and the malevolent wizard can throw at him. Full of daring adventures, and peopled with a remarkable collection of magical-and monstrous-characters, the resulting epic is a brilliantly ironic retelling of the medieval fairy tale world of swashbuckling knights and damsels in distress.

Boris Godunov and Little Tragedies

A tale of intrigue, deception, murder and retribution, ‘Boris Godunov’ charts the rise and fall of an ambitious prince who cannot avoid facing the consequences of his dark past. Based on the historical figure of the nobleman Boris Godunov, who seized power from Ivan the Terrible’s successor in sixteenth century Russia, and partly inspired by Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’, Alexander Pushkin’s 1825 play showcases the author’s mastery of verse and dramatic form. Also included in this volume are Pushkin’s celebrated four Little Tragedies: ‘Mozart and Salieri’, ‘The Miserly Knight’, ‘The Stone Guest’ and ‘A Feast During the Plague’.

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